Victorian London - Directories - Dickens's Dictionary of London, by Charles Dickens, Jr., 1879 - "STA-SWI"

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Stationery Office, Prince’s-street, Storey’s-gate, Westminster, S.W. Hours 10 till 4.—NEAREST Railway Station, Westminster-bridge; Omnibus Routes, Parliament-street and Victoria-street; Cab Rank, Palace-yard.

Statues. — Unfortunately, London is not celebrated, although it may be notorious, for its public statues. They are to be encountered in all quarters of the town, from the melancholy effigy of Cobden in Camden Town, to the uncomfortable seated figure of Peabody at the back of the Royal Exchange, or the still more forlorn Dr. Jenner in Kensington-gardens. It is difficult to go very wrong with a simple column, and as the statues which crown the York and Nelson columns are out of the reach of inspection, these monuments are not without merit. At the foot of the Nelson column are Sir Edwin Landseers four colossal lions, perhaps the most artistic effigies in the streets of London. The equestrian statue of Richard Coeur de Lion, by Baron Marochetti, in Palace-row, Westminster, and Sir Gilbert Scott’s Crimean memorial to officers educated at Westminster School which is to be found in Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, are well worthy of a special visit. The curious history of the equestrian statue of Charles I., at Charing. cross, gives it a peculiar interest quite apart from considerations of art. The same cannot be said of the surprising statue of the Duke of Wellington at Hyde-park-corner. The Guards’ Memorial at the foot of Waterloo-place is not without a certain massive effect. The National Memorial to the Prince Consort in Hyde-park should by all means be seen, if only as a warning that the expenditure of vast sums of money does not necessarily lead to satisfactory results. There is an almost grotesque Statue of Queen Anne, absurdly dwarfed by the great west front of St. Paul’s Cathedral which is in so deplorable a state of repair that it may be hoped that it will shortly be taken out of the unequal competition with Sir Christopher Wren’s magnum opus. Wayfarers in the squares should by no means be tempted to inspect the statues by which many of them are adorned, although the accumulated smoke of years has happily, to a large extent, concealed the sculptors’ intentions. The following are the principal open-air statues, monuments, and memorials of the metropolis.
ACHILLES, Hyde-park.
ALBERT MEMORIAL, Kensingtomn-gore.
ANNE (QUEEN) Queen-square, Bloomsbury; Queen-square-Westminster; and St.Paul’s, churchyard;
BEDFORD (DUKE OF), Russell-sq.
BENTINCK (LORD GEORGE), Cavendish-square.
BRUNEL, Victoria Embankment.
CANNING (GEO.), New Palace-yard.
CHARLES I., Charing-cross.
CHARLES II., Soho-square and Chelsea Hospital.
CLEOPATRA’S NEEDLE, Victoria Embankment.
CLYDE (LORD), Waterloo-place.
COBDEN, Camden Town.
CORAM (CAPT.), Foundling Hos.
CUMBERLAND (DUKE OF), Cavendish-square.
EDWARD VI., Christ’s, St. Bartholomew’s, and St. Thomas’s Hospitals.
ELEANOR CROSS, Charing-cross railway-station.
FOX, Bloomsbury-square.
FRANKLIN (SIR J.), Waterloo-pl.
GEORGE III., Somerset House and Cockspur-street.
GEORGE IV., Trafalgar-square.
GUARDS’ MEMORIAL, Waterloo-pl.
GUT (THOMAS), Guy’s.Hospital.
HAVELOCK (GEN.), Trafalgar-sq.
HENRY VIII., St. Bartholomew’s.
JAMES II., Whitehall.
JENNER (DR.), Kensington-gdns.
KENT (DUKE OF), Portland-place.
MARBLE ARCH, Oxford-street.
MILL (J. S.), Victoria Embankment.
MONUMENT, Fish-street-hill.
MYDDLETON (SIR HUGH), Islington-green.
NAPIER (GENERAL SIR CHARLES), Trafalgar-square.
NELSON, Trafalgar-square.
OUTRAM (SIR J.), Victoria Embankment.
PALMERSTON (LORD), Palace-yd.
PAXTON (SIR J.), Crystal Palace.
PEABODY (GEO.),Royal Exchange.
PEEL. (SIR ROBERT), Cheapside.
PITT (WILLIAM), Hanover-square.
PRINCE CONSORT, Holborn. viaduct, Horticultural-gardens, and Albert Memorial.
RICHARD I., Old Palace-yard.
SHAKESPEARE, Leicester-square.
SLOANE (SIR HANS) Botanic-gardens, Chelsea.
VICTORIA(QUEEN), Rl. Exchange.
WELLINGTON, Hyde-park-corner, Tower-gr, and Royal Exchange.
WESTMINSTER SCHOOL CRIMEAN MEMORIAL, Broad Sanctuary.
WILLIAM III., St. James’s-square.
WILLIAM IV., King William-street.
YORK (DUKE OF), Carlton House-terrace.

Steamboat (London) Company –PRICE LIST OF BOATS FOR PRIVATE EXCURSION PARTIES – The prices quoted below include pier dues, except at Charing-cross, London-bridge-wharf, Blackwall, Charlton, North Woolwich, all piers below Woolwich, and Teddington-lock dues.

DOWN-RIVER BOATS


WESTMINSTER TO ERITH OR GRAVESEND

WESTMINSTER TO SOUTHEND OR SHEERNESS

LONDON-BR TO CLACTON-ON-SEA


PRICE

Steamers to convey passengers as under.

PRICE

Steamers to convey passengers as under.

PRICE

On Mondays and Saturdays

Any day except Saturday, Sunday or Monday

On Mondays and Saturdays

Any day except Saturday, Sunday or Monday

Any day except Saturday, Sunday or Monday


£

£


£

£


£

*800

55

50

500

60

55

-


*700

48

40

400

50

45

370
309

60
50

*500

35

32

300

40

35

278
260

45
45

470

25

22

250

28

25

240
209

40
35

400

23

20

200

24

23

CHELSEA TO GREENWICH OR WOOLWICH

350

21

17

180

22

20

300

17

16

-

-

-

280

16

14

-

19

-

440
350

16
13

250

14

13

160

-

-

300

12


UP RIVER BOATS

Steamers to convey passengers as under.

FROM CHELSEA OR LONDON-BRIDGE TO GRAVESEND

FROM CHELSEA OR LONDON-BRIDGE TO WOOLWICH

FROM LONDON-BRIDGE TO KEW OR RICHMOND

FROM LONDON-BRIDGE TO HAMPTON COURT

On Mondays and Saturdays

Any day except Saturday, Sunday or Monday


£

£

£

£  s

£  s

350

21

17

13

13  0

16  0

300

18

16

12

TO KEW
12  0

-

280

16

14

11

TO KEW
11  10

-

250

14

13

10

-

-

230

13

12

9

-

-

200

12

11

8

-

-


The Steamers marked * cannot start from any pier above Paul’s-wharf.

SPECIAL NOTICE – N.B. Above Gravesend, children not in arms count as adults; below that station, two children under twelve count as one adult. Parties engaging boats are informed that they will be held responsible for any fine or other penalty for which the Company may be held liable for any infringement of this notice.
In August extra prices will be charged for all the steamers.
No vessels will be let for excursions on Sundays, General Holidays, or days of Sailing or Rowing
Matches, except by special agreement. No vessel will be allowed to leave Sheerness after 4.30 p.m.; Gravesend after 6.30 p.m.; Erith after 7 p.m.; Woolwich or Greenwich after 7.30 p.m.; Kew after 6.30 p.m.; Hampton after 5.30 p.m. Parties engaging a boat are also informed that tickets are not allowed to be sold on or near the piers, either before or on the day of the  Excursion, nor for Rowing Matches.
ROWING MATCHES.—To accompany Match in afternoon from Greenwich or Woolwich to Erith only, with 200 passengers, £8. If required for Excursion after Match, £10. If steamer is required to start from and return to London, £11. Putney to Mortlake from London-bridge, £9; if the boat proceeds to Kew, £12, including landing; or to Richmond, £13. The numbers to be limited to 200 on any one boat.
LIST OF PIERS AND PLACES AT WHICH  THE COMPANY’S STEAMBOATS CALL.
Hampton Court—For the Palace and Bushey-park.
Teddington Lock and Petersham.
Richmond—For hill, park, and boating.
Kew.—Gardens.
Hammersmith.-—Metropolitan & District Railway.
Putney.—For Fnlham.
Chelsea and Cadogan.
Battersea-park.
Do. Railway Pier. — For London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway.
Pimlico.—(St. George’s-square).
Nine-Elms.—South-Western Railway.
Millbank.—Penitentiary.
Lambeth.—For Kennington-road, Princess-st, the Palace, and St. Thomas’s Hospital.
Westminster.—For Parliament Houses, District Railway, Abbey, Parks, and Public Offices.
Charing-cross.—For Charing-cross, Regent-st, St. Martin’s-lane, Pall Mall, and Oxford-st.
Waterloo—For Somerset House, Strand, Gaiety, Lyceum, Drury-lane, and Covent-garden Theatres.
Temple—For Strand, Chancery-lane, Fleet-st, &c.
Blackfriars-bridge. —For London, Chatham, and Dover Railway the District Line, Aldersgate –st, Fleet-st, and Bridge-st.
St. Pauls.—For St. Paul’s, Blackfriars, Ludgate-hill, Newgate-st, General Post Office, &c. Company’s Office—Bennet’s-hill.
London-bridge.—For the City, Cheapside, Bank, Royal Exchange, King William-st, Thames-st, Coal Exchange, Billingsgate, The Tower.
London-bridge (Surrey Side).—For the Borough, Guy’s Hospital, London-bridge Railways, and Crystal Palace.
Cherry-gardens.—For Rotherhithe, Southwark-pk, the East London Railway, &c. -
The Tunnel.—For Wapping, London and St. Katherine’s.docks, the East London Railway for the Crystal Palace, &c.
G1obe-stairs.—For Rotherhithe, Surrey Commercial-docks, &c.
Limehouse. — For Limehouse and West India-docks.
West India-dock—Close to the dock entrance.
Commercial-dock.—For the Surrey and Commercial Docks, Deptford, &c.
Millwall.—For Millwall docks and upper part of the Isle of Dogs.
Greenwich—For Greenwich Naval College, the Park and Observatory, Naval Museum, Blackheath, Kidbrooke, Lee, Lewisham &c.
Isle of Dogs—For the Docks and North Greenwich Railway to Fenchurch-st.
Cubitt Town—For Poplar, Mr. Samuda’s Yard, and the lower part of the Isle of Dogs.
Blackwall.—For the East and West India Docks, Victoria-docks, the Blackwall Railway, and the
North London Railway, for all stations on the North London District.
Charlton.—For the Dockyard, Barracks, Rotunda, Common, Wood-st, West Woolwich, Shooters’-hill, and Charlton. The Marine Society’s Ship Warspite.
Woolwich—For the Royal Arsenal, Barracks, East and North Woolwich, Plumstead, Artillery Barracks, and Shooter’s-hill.
North Woolwich.—The Boats call at this pier during the summer with passengers for the gardens.
Erith.—Gardens.
Greenhithe.—H. M.S. Worcester and the training ships Chichester and Arethusa
Rosherville.—Gardens, Northfleet, New Thames Yacht Club.
Gravesend.—Milton, Tilbury.
Southend.—For Shoebury
Sheerness—For Chatham Boats, Queenboro’.
Clacton-on-Sea.—(Royal Hotel), Great and Little Holland.
Walton-on-Naze.—(Dorlings and Clifton Hotels), Thorpe, Weeley.
Harwich—For Dovercourt and Felixstowe.
Ipswich.—Trains for Norwich, Yarmouth, Lowestoft, and all stations on Great Eastern Railway.
Passengers using the after or saloon deck and after cabin must pay chief cabin fare; smoking abaft the funnel or in the chief cabin is strictly prohibited; no passengers are allowed on the bridge-boards, and passengers are particularly warned not to sit or stand on the paddle-boxes; no person except the company’s servants allowed to be in the engine-rooms or to interfere with the working of the vessels; all dogs charged for at the same rate as passengers; all luggage must be paid for; refreshments are provided on board the vessels at fixed rates, and the contractors are not allowed to charge more than the authorised scale, a copy of which may be seen on board; children under three years of age are conveyed free—above three years and under twelve years, at one-half the ordinary fares, except in the 1d, 2d., 3d. fares. By the Act 25 & 26 Vict. c. 63, the company refuse to convey intoxicated passengers, and should such person attempt to go onboard after his fare (if he has taken his ticket) has been offered to be returned to him, such person renders himself liable to a penalty of  40s.
HOURS OF STARTING
Up. LONDON-BRIDGE TO CHELSEA – Every 10 minutes from 9 a.m to 7 p.m.
London-bridge .. At the even quarters of the hours.
Paul’s-wharf     3, 18, 33, & 48 min. past hours.
Blackfriars     5, 20, 35, & 50
Temple 8, 23, 38, & 53
Waterloo     11, 26, 41, & 56
Charing-cross 13, 28, 43, & 58                   
Westminster 3, 18, 33, & 48
Lambeth 8, 23, 38, & 53
Millbank      11, 26, 41, & 56
Nine Elms...... 15, 30, & 45
Pimlico 2, 27, 32, & 47
Railway-pier   .. 6, 21, 36, & 51
Battersea-park .. 8, 23, 38, & 53
Cadogan     11, 26, 41, & 56
Chelsea-bridge ..Arrive even quarters of the hours

DOWN—CHELSEA TO LONDON-BRIDGE.—Every 10 minutes, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Chelsea-bridge .. At the even quarters of the hours
Cadogan 3, 18, 33, & 48 min. past hours.
Battersea-park  5, 20, 35, & 50
Railway-pier  7, 22, 37, & 52
Pimlico 10, 25, 40, & 55
Nine Elms 12, 27, 42, & 57
Millbank  1, 16, 31, & 46
Lambeth 4, 19, 32, & 49
Westminster 9, 24, 39, & 54
Charing-cross 22, 27, 42, & 57
Waterloo 14, 29, 44, & 59
Temple 1, t6, 31, & 47
Blackfriars 4, 99[sic], 34, & 52
Paul’s-wharf  6, 21, 36, & 45
London-bridge .. Arrive even quarters of the hours.

An extra boat at 8 from Pimlico to London-bridge.
Express boat at 9.5, calling at Cadogan, Batterseaa-park, Nine Elms, Westminster, Temple, to London. bridge.
FERRY STEAMERS cross the River Thames every few minutes between London-bridge (Surrey side), St. Paul’s. and Blackfriars-piers, connecting the Brighton, Crystal Palace, South London, and South Eastern Railways with the Metropolitan District, and Chatham and Dover Railways, from 8.30 a.m. till about 7 p.m.

Up.—WOOLWICH TO WESTMINSTER.—Every half hour, from 8.30 am, to 6 p.m.
Woolwich    At the hours and half hours.
Charlton About 5 & 35 min. past hours
Blackwall About 15 to & 15
Cubitt-town About 7 to & 23
Greenwich About hours and half hours.
Millwall  About 5 & 35 min. past hours
Commercial-dock About  10 & 40
West India-dock About 14 & 44
Limehouse About 27 & 47
Globe-stairs About 20 & 50
Tunnel  About 24 & 53
Cherry-garden About  26 & 55
London-bridge About 13 & 33
Blackfriars About    8 & 41
Temple About 11 & 44
Charing-cross About  14 & 47
Westminster Arrive about 17 & 50

Down—WESTMINSTER TO WOOLWICH.—Every half hour, from 8.10 a.m. to 6.40p.m.
Westminster . 10 & 40 min. past hours.
Charing-cross .. About 15 & 45
Temple About  17 & 47
Blackfriars About 20 & 50
London-bridge  About hours and half hours.
Cherry-garden About 5 & 35 min. past hours.
Tunnel About 8 & 38
Globe-stairs About 12 & 42
Limehouse About 15 & 45
West India-dock About 18 & 47
Commercial-dock About 22 & 51
Millwall-dock About 27 & 56
Greenwich About hours and half hours.
Cubitt-town About 3 & 33 min. past hours.
Blackwall  About 10 & 40
Charlton About 17 & 47
Woolwich  Arrive about 3 & 33
For all piers above Westminster passengers must change boats at London-bridge or Westminster, and at Blackfriars for the District Railway.
Fast boats leave Woolwich at 8.15 and 8.40; Charlton, 8.20 and 8.45; Greenwich, 8.40 and 9.15; Cherry-garden, 9.3, for London-bridge; and London-bridge, 5.15, direct for Greenwich, Charlton, and Woolwich, except Sundays.
                                               
TABLE OF FARES.   Fore Deck Aft Deck
Nine Elms & all piers between, to Waterloo 1d. 2d.
Lambeth, Westminster, Charing-cross,&c. to London-bridge 1d. 2d.
Lambeth, Westminster, Charing-cross, the Temple, and Blackfriars, to or from Cherry-gardens and Tunnel .. -. 2d 3d.
Lambeth and Westminster, to or from Globe-stairs, Limehouse, W. Ind-dock 3d. 4d.
Lambeth and Westminster, to or from Commercial-dk., Millwall, and Greenw. 4d. 6d.
Lambeth and Westminster, to or from Cubitt Town, Blackwall, Charlton, and Woolwich ..5d. 6d.
Chelsea to London-bridge 2d. 4d.
Chelsea to Tunnel 3d. (no thro’ booking Sunday or holidays)
Chelsea to  West India Dock 4d. . (no thro’ booking Sunday or holidays)
Chelsea to Greenwich 5d. . (no thro’ booking Sunday or holidays)
Chelsea to Woolwich 6d. . (no thro’ booking Sunday or holidays)
London-bridge, to or from Cherry-gardens or the Tunnel  1d. 2d.
London-bridge, to or from Globe-stairs, Limehouse, or West India-dock . 2d. 3d.
London-bridge to or from Commercial-dock, Millwall, and Greenwich ,. 3d. 4d.
London-bridge to or from Cubitt Town, Blackwall, Charlton, and Woolwich ..4d. 6d.
Cherry-gardens to or from Tunnel or     Globe-stairs 1d. 2d.
Cherry-gdns or Tunnel to or from Limehouse, West India-dk, or Commercial-dk 2d. 3d.
Cherry-gardens or Tunnel to or from Millwall and Greenwich 3d. 4d
Cherry-gardens or Tunnel to or from Cubitt Town, Blackwall,andWoolwich 4d. 6d.
Limehouse, West India-dock, or Commercial-dock to or from Millwall .. 2d. 3d.
Limehouse, West India-dock, or Commercial Dock to or from Greenwich, or Cubitt Town 3d.
Limehouse, West India-dock, or Commercial-dock to or from, Blackwall, Charlton, or Woolwich 4d. 6d.
Limehouse to or from West India-dock 1d. 3d.
Globe-stairs to or from Limehouse 1d. 2d.
Globe-stairs to or from Cherry-gardens.. 1d. 2d.
West Ind-dk to or from Commercial-dk. 1d. 2d.
Millwall to or from Greenwich 2d. 3d.
Millwall to or from Blackwall, Charlton, or Woolwich 4d. 6d.
Woolwich to or from Charlton 2d. 3d.
Chelsea and all piers between, to Lambeth 1d. 2d.
Saloon fares on Sundays and holidays.

Stock Exchange.The London market for the purchase and sale of public stocks, shares, and other securities of a similar class is situated in Capel-court and Shorter’s-court, close to the Bank of England. Certain transactions in connection with some of the great bubbles of the last speculative era directed considerable outside attention to the Stock Exchange and its members, and the public impression that there must be something wrong in its system and mode of transacting business became so strong, that in 1877 a Royal Commission was appointed to “enquire into the origin, objects, present constitution, customs, and usages of the London Stock Exchange, and the mode of transacting business in and in connection with that institution, and whether such existing rules, customs, and mode of conducting business are in accordance with law, and with the requirements of public policy.” A great quantity of evidence was collected during the sittings of the Commission, and the result was not unfavourable to the Stock Exchange; the report of the Commission remarking that on the whole the existence of the institution and the action of its rules had been salutary to the public interests, that its laws had been administered uprightly and honestly, and that under them the enforcement of fair dealing and the repression of fraud were often more promptly and satisfactorily obtained than would be the case in courts of law. The earliest minutes bearing upon the origin of the Stock Exchange are those of 1798 (although in them mention is made of a similar association as having existed in 1773), and from them it appears that the business of stockbrokers and jobbers was conducted towards the end of the eighteenth century partly in the Rotunda of the Bank of England, but chiefly in rooms at the Stock Exchange Coffee House in Threadneedle-street, to which admission could be obtained on payment of sixpence. At the beginning of this century the greatly increasing business became too much for the rooms, and the indiscriminate admission of the public was calculated to expose the dealers to the loss of valuable property. Accordingly, a body of gentlemen acquired a site near Capel-court, raised a capital of £20,000, and erected a new and spacious building for the accommodation of the new undertaking. A Committee for General Purposes was formed, and new members elected by ballot at a subscription of £10 10s. The objects of the undertaking are described by Mr. Levien, the secretary to the General Purposes Committee, to be (1) to provide a ready market, and (2) to make such regulations as would ensure the prompt and regular adjustment of all contracts. The administration of the Stock Ex change is in the hands of two bodies with distinct functions. The Managers represent the shareholders (the 400 shares have now been subdivided into 4,000), and are the executive of the proprietors of the building, but have no control over the business transacted by the members. All matters belonging to this department are in the hands of the Committee for General Purposes, who represent the subscribers or members of the Stock Exchange, and are elected by them annually. The subscriptions of members (who also have to be elected annually) are taken by the Managers, and constitute, in fact, the rent paid for the building. Candidates for election as members must be recommended by three members of not less than four years’ standing, who must have personal knowledge of the applicant and his circumstances, and who engage to pay £500 each to the creditors in case the member so recommended be declared a defaulter within four years from the date of his admission. The entrance fee in this case is £105 and the subscription £22 1s. If the candidate has been a clerk in the Stock Exchange for four years previous to his application, he requires two sureties only for £300 each for four years, his entrance fee is £63, and subscription £22 1s.      The members are divided into brokers and jobbers or dealers; the former buying and selling for clients, the latter being always ready to “make a price,” and to buy and sell almost any quantity of current securities, looking for their profit to the difference between the price they can obtain, and that at which they can buy. There is no official tariff for commissions, this being a matter which is left for arrangement between brokers and their principals. It should be noted that, although all brokers necessarily take out a license from the Corporation (under a penalty of £105), the possession of such a license, which costs £5, carries with it no right of admission to the Stock Exchange, which is entirely in the hands of the Committee. It should be borne in mind that the Committee of the Stock Exchange strictly forbid any members to advertise. Members unable to fulfil their engagements are publicly declared defaulters by direction of the chairman, deputy-chairman, or any two members of the
committee. Defaulters are only eligible for re-admission when they have paid at least one-third of the balance of the loss caused by their failure, independently of the security money, or when they have recouped the sureties one-third of the amount paid by them when the debts have been less than the amount secured. Further, they must have failed in one of two classes: the first for failures arising from the default of principals, where no bad faith or breach of rules has been practised, and where the operations have been in fair proportion to the defaulter’s means; the second for cases which have been marked by indiscretion and the absence of reasonable caution. Re-admission is entirely in the hands of the Committee for General Purposes, by whom also are settled all disputes between members, and between members and non-members, if the latter be willing. The names of defaulters are now officially communicated to the daily papers. The members of the Stock Exchange number about 2,200 (of whom 860 are brokers) and 1,120 clerks. Some of the clerks are members; in these cases they are not allowed to transact business for themselves. The total revenue accruing to the managers is some £70,000 which leaves a net balance of some £52,000. The shares are valuable, and the building account having been cleared off will probably be still more so. Strict privacy is maintained on the Stock Exchange, and visitors are not admitted.

Stoke Newington lies rather high on the north side, a little to the north-east of Islington. Rents very moderate, but perhaps a little higher than those of Islington; the situation being more open, and the houses of a somewhat superior character. NEAREST Railway Station, Rectory-road and Stoke Newington (G.E.R.); Omnibus Routes, Stoke Newington-road and Albion-road.

Strand. — The Strand is one of the historical streets of London. It was formerly the water-side road, whence its name between the cities of London anti Westminster. Between it and the river lay the palaces of the great nobles, and on the other side the green fields stretched away without a break to the north. The road was bad then, and people who could afford it took boat for the City at Westminster-stairs, in preference to picking their way along the ill-paved streets, with the chance of being pushed aside into the deep holes that abounded by the numerous lackeys and retainers. As the steamers have driven the watermen from the river, so the growth of London has swept away the palaces, and the names of the streets alone mark where they stood. The Strand is a great thoroughfare still, and the connecting link between the City and the West. Fashion seldom goes east of Charing-cross, and the great drapery shops of the West-end are consequently conspicuous by their absence; nor upon the other hand does business in the City man’s sense of the word, come west of Temple-bar. Hence the Strand is a compromise. There is somehow an air of greater lightness and gaiety than is apparent in the City. There are more women among the foot passengers, more looking into shop windows, and an absence of that hurried walk and preoccupied look which prevail in the City proper. The difference will at once strike the observer, and is the main characteristic of the street. The stranger will probably be disappointed at his first visit to the Strand, and in truth the houses which line it are for the most part unworthy of its position as a portion of the greatest thoroughfare in London. Nor, with the exception of the New Law Courts at its eastern end, the Charing-cross Hotel, and a few private shops, has much been done in the way of improvement in the Strand. When the two churches of St. Clement Danes and St. Mary-le-Strand are swept away, and Booksellers’-row disappears, the Strand may become a noble thoroughfare; but at present there is no street of equal importance in any capital of Europe so unworthy of its position. The Strand is essentially the home of theatres. The Adelphi, Lyceum, Gaiety, Vaudeville, Strand, and Opera Comique are in the street itself, while hard by are the Globe, the Olympic, and the Folly. Exeter Hall is also in the Strand.

Strand Theatre, on the south side of the Strand just east of Somerset House. Specialty, comedy, burlesque, and opera bouffe, particularly the two latter. NEAREST Railway Station, Temple; Omnibus Route, Strand. Cab Rank, St. Clement’s Church (north side).

Streets.—It may by some be considered superfluous to give any directions for the guidance of foot passengers in the streets, but in city where the traffic is so large, and the press and hurry so great as is the case in London, a few words of caution will be found not to be without their use. The first thing to recollect is, that people who are only bent on pleasure should give way to those who clearly have some business object in view. What called in America mere “loafing” should always be avoided. Not only is the “loafer” always in everbody’s way, but he is invariably the favourite mark for the pickpocket. However attractive the shop-window of which the idler wishes to take stock, the watch and other pocket property must always be carefully guarded. Perhaps no custom contributes more to the support of London thieves than the practice which many ladies indulge of carrying their purses in their hands. Be very chary of strangers who accost you in the street. It is possible that they only wish to know the time or to ask the way. It is, however, quite as likely that they belong to the great fraternity of sharpers and swell mobsmen, and are only paving the way to the ultimate transaction of business. A street row or crowd should always be avoided. If there be really so difficulty on hand, private interference can do no good, and police intervention is sure not to be long delayed. But it very frequently happens that a disturbance created by street thieves solely with a view to their own profit. It is well to give houses building or under repair a wide berth. Bricks, lumps of plaster, paint, workmen’s tools, &c., are easily dropped from the ladder or scaffolding and may cause a lifelong injury. Visitors to London in the spring, when cleaning and repainting are the fashion, should be on their guard against wet paint. Coal-flaps and gratings of all kinds should be distrusted. A butcher with his tray, a sweep with his brush, a carpenter with his saw protruding from his basket, and a scavenger 1adling mud into his cart, must be treated with the greatest respect— they will treat you with none. Scarcely less dangerous are the ladies and gentlemen who persist in swinging umbrellas, parasols, and sticks about to the common danger, without the slightest idea of the damage they may do. It is desirable, where possible, for foot passengers to keep to the right. It is hardly necessary to add that any form of street altercation or quarrel should be most carefully avoided, and that in this, as most other matters, the man who knows how to give and take fairly will get through London with the least trouble and inconvenience to himself and others. Crossing, although a matter that has been lately much facilitated by the judicious erection of what may be called “refuges,” and by the stationing of police. constables at many of the more dangerous points, still requires care and circumspection. Many a general action is fought with a smaller list of killed than this class of accident annually supplies in London. One of the most fatal errors is to attempt the crossing in an undecided frame of mind, while hesitation, or a change of plan midway, is ruinous.—(For a description of some of the principal streets of London see under the respective names.)

Sunday is not a pleasant day for a stranger in London. Shops and places of amusement are shut. A very large proportion of eating-houses of every kind also close entirely during Sunday, whilst many of those which open at all only do so in the evening. In the summer afternoons, however, there is generally music in the parks, especially Regents, Victoria, and Battersea, and a Fellow’s order will admit to the Zoological Gardens, which is the fashionable promenade on Sunday afternoons. Any one studying London life should, especially in summer, visit Victoria-park in the evening; and there are also at times preachings in some of the East-end theatres. Most of the railways—especially the southern —run fast excursion trains to various points, leaving at from 7 to 9a.m.,and returning about 10 p.m, at exceedingly low fares.

Suppers. — “Legislature’s harsh decree,” as Mr. H. S. Leigh has it, and the late hours at which theatrical managers close their houses, have almost had the effect of ousting supper from its old position as a cheery public meal. Suppers of course, can still be had in public but there is generally, and certainly after twelve o’clock, an uncomfortable feeling that the proceedings are in some way obnoxious to the law, and, as the minutes go by, the uneasiness of the head waiter is apt to damp the spirits of the convives. It is under the fostering shadow of the theatres that the supper-house still flourishes. The Albion, Covent Garden, opposite Drury-lane Theatre; the Gaiety, the Criterion, and the S James’s Hall Restaurants; the Cafe de l’Europe, adjoining the Haymarket Theatre; Epitaux’s in Pall Mall-east; and the Pall Mall Restaurant, all have a specialty for suppers. Most of the oyster houses can also be relied upon for a good midnight meal. The effect of the early closing Act, and one perhaps not contemplated by its promoters, has been the establishment of an enormous number of minor clubs, whose principal business is transacted at night. It by no means follows that the Londoner who is turned out of his tavern or restaurant goes home to bed. On the contrary, he is much more likely to adjourn to his club, where he can—and does— enjoy himself until the small hours grow large again. It may be added that the rules of many of these clubs are easy, and their committees kind. Little difficulty need therefore be apprehended inobtaining admission to one or other of these quasi taverns.

Surrey Theatre, Blackfriars-road.-—The principal Surrey-side theatre, standing just at the junction of the great roads from Westminster, Waterloo, and Blackfriars bridges. Specialty, melodrama, farce, and pantomime. NEAREST Railway Stations, Borough-road (London, Chatham, & Dover) and Blackfriars (Metropolitan); Omnibus Routes, Blackfriars - road, Waterloo-road, and Westminster-bridge-road.

Sweden and Norway. MINISTRY, 47, Charles-st, Berkeley-sq. NEAREST Railway Station, St. James’s-park; Omnibus Routes, Piccadilly,  Park-lane, Oxford-street, and Regent-street; Cab Rank, Piccadilly. CONSULATE, 24, Gt. Winchester-street; NEAREST Railway Station Bishopsgate and Mansion House; Omnibus Routes, Moorgate-street, Old Broad-street, and Cheapside; Cab Rank, New Broad-street.

Swimming. —The principal Swimming Clubs in London are as follows
ALLIANCE, City of London Bath, Golden-lane, Barbican. 1s. per quarter.
AMATEUR, St. George’s Bath, Buckingham-palace-road. 10s 6d. per annum.
CADOGAN, Chelsea Bath, 171, King’s-road, Chelsea. 10s. 6d. per annum
CAMDEN, St. Pancras Bath, King-street, Camden Town. 2s. per month.
CYGNUS, Addington-square Bath, Camberwell. 10s per annum.
DREADNOUGHT, Victoria Bath, Peckham. 1s. 6d. per quarter.
EXCELSIOR, St. Pancras Bath, Tottenham-court-road. 2s. 6d. per quarter.
ILEX. Lambeth Bath, Westminster-bridge-road. 5s. per annum.
NORTH LONDON, North London Bath, Pentonville. 2s. 6d. per quarter.
OTTER, Marylebone Bath, Marylebone. 10s. 6d. per annum.
REGENT, St. Pancras Bath, Ling-street, Camden Town. 1s. per month.
ST. PANCRAS, St. Pancras Bath, Tottenham-court-road. 2s. 6d. per quarter.
SERPENTINE St. George’s Bath, Davies-street, Berkeley-square. 10s. per annum.
SOUTH LONDON, Lambeth Bath, Westminster-bridge-road. 1s. per month.
SOUTH EAST LONDON, Victoria Bath, Peckham. 2s. 6d. per annum.
WEST LONDON, St. Pancras Bath, Tottenham-court-road. 2s. per quarter.
Racing frequently takes place at the various baths, and, in the season, in the Thames and Serpentine; indeed, some enthusiasts even race in the latter unsavoury water at Christmas. There is a floating bath on the Thames at Charing.cross.

Switzerland.— CONSULATE, 25, Old Broad-street. NEAREST Railway Stations, Bishopsgate and Mansion House ; Omnibus Routes, Old Broad-street, Moorgate-street, and Cheapside; Cab Rank,  New Brood-street.