Victorian London - Districts - Areas of London - Bloomsbury

Victorian London - Publications - Humour - Punch - cartoon 86 - Bloomsbury

FLUNKEIANA

Flunkey (who does not approve of Bloomsbury). "NO, MA'AM, I DON'T OBJEC TO THE 'OUSE, FOR IT'S HAIREY, AND THE VITTLES IS GOOD; BUT THE FACT IS, THAT ALL MY CONNECTIONS LIVE IN BELGRAVIA!"

Punch, Jan.-Jun. 1855

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Bloomsbury is the district bounded on the south by New Oxford Street, on the west by Tottenham.Court Road, on the north by the Euston-Road, and on the east by Gray’s-inn. It was at one time a fashionable quarter of the town, and contains several good squares, among them Bedford, Russell, Brunswick and Tavistock Squares. The houses in the two former of these are large, roomy, and substantially built; whilst both for houses and garden Russell-square is incomparably the finest in London. Rents, very moderate; but the Bedford Estate leases are rather stringent. To strangers its chief interest is that in Russell-street, Bloomsbury, stands the British Museum. Although no longer a fashionable, it is still an eminently respectable district of London, and as it is not traversed by any main thoroughfares, its streets and squares, with the exception of some few which are still paved with the old heavy stones, are remarkably quiet, and free from noise and bustle. NEAREST Railway Station, Gower.street; Omnibus Routes, Marylebone-road. Tottenham.Court Road, Gray’s-inn-road, and Oxford-street.  

Charles Dickens (Jr.), Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1879