Victorian London - Entertainment and Recreation - Parks, Commons and Heaths - Battersea Park

BATTERSEA PARK. Battersea Park (185 acres) skirts the southern bank of the Thames, between Chelsea and Battersea Bridges; extends about 2 miles in length, and 1 miles in breadth; and was completed in 1852-1859, at an expenditure of 320,000l. nearly. The plantations are as yet in their infancy, and the whole Park has a disagreeable air of newness; but a promenade on the river-terrace may reasonably be commended to the London explorator. The Park is easily accessible. Steamboats stop at Battersea pier; the London and South-Coast Railway Company have a station close at hand; and the new Chelsea iron bridge connects it with Chelsea, Pimlico, and Belgravia.
    The notorious duel between the Earl of Winchelsea and the Duke of Wellington occurred in this vicinity.

Cruchley's London in 1865 : A Handbook for Strangers, 1865

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Battersea Park. A large open space, lying low, and not particularly fashionable, but prettily laid out, on the Surrey bank of the river, between Chelsea and Albert-bridges. The sub-tropical garden is one of the principal attractions of the park, and well deserves a visit. NEAREST Railway Stations Battersea-road and York-road. There is also a steamboat pier for Battersea-park.  

Charles Dickens (Jr.), Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1879

Battersea Park, London, is on the Surrey side of the river and in the S.W. district. One of the youngest of the London parks (having only just attained its majority) it is certainly  one of the prettiest. No park or garden in London can compare with the sub-tropical garden, which is emphatically one of the sights which no visitor should fail to see, especially in the latter part of the summer. The park contains excellent drives, and is encircled by a superior Rotten Row, or prepared ride. There is every accommodation for cricketers, and boating may be indulged in on the lake, which adds greatly to the picturesqueness of the ingeniously planned grounds. The park gates are in Albert-road, Prince of Wales-road, and Victoria-road, and the fine terrace-walk facing the river is directly approached from the steamboat-pier. Light refreshments may be had at nearly all the lodges, and in the neighbourhood of the park there is good accommodation. The best way of approaching Battersea from the west is along the Grosvenor-road and over Chelsea Suspension Bridge. Nearest Bridges, Chelsea and Albert; Steamboat Pier and Railway Station, Battersea Park.

Charles Dickens (Jr.), Dickens's Dictionary of the Thames, 1881

ALBERT PALACE. BATTERSEA PARK ... A handsome glass structure comprising large halls for concerts and general entertainments. The grand organ in the Connaught Hall is considered one of the best in the United Kingdom. Trains from Waterloo, Ludgate Hill, Victoria and Addison Road, Kensington. Steamboats from all piers. Tramcars from Westminster Bridge.
...
BATTERSEA PARK ... BATTERSEA. A Park of 200 acres, on the south bank of the Thames. The sub-tropical garden is tastefully laid out with flowers and rare plants. These may be seen in perfection during the months of August and September. Open free, daily. Steamers from the various piers.

Reynolds' Shilling Coloured Map of London, 1895

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - A London County Council Band in Battersea Park

A London County Council Band in Battersea Park - photograph

A LONDON COUNTY COUNCIL BAND IN BATTERSEA PARK.

Battersea Park was pre-eminently the recreation ground of the democrats until the aristocrats took to cycling, and discovered in their turn the beauties of the place, which was laid out more than forty years ago at a Cost of upwards of 300,000. But one of the most interesting spectacles in Battersea Park is the crowd from the densely-populated neighbourhood which gathers to listen to the music of one of the London County Council's bands. No bigger crowd can be seen round the bandstand in any of the other open spaces of the Metropolis. The Council's bands, it must be said, are capitally organised, and no ratepayer with any music in his soul can feel that he does not get his money's worth.

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - Cycling in Battersea Park

Cycling in Battersea Park - photograph

CYCLING IN BATTERSEA PARK

"Better late than never," cyclists said when Society took to riding bicycles on every possible occasion. Someone discovered that the roads in Battersea Park were excellent. and ere long the cycling parade there became quite one of the sights of the 1895 season. Rotten Row, in Hyde Park, soon became almost deserted by riders on horse-back, who preferred wheeling at Battersea. Scores of ladies and gentlemen belonging to the upper classes could be counted on any fine morning cycling at Battersea. Its popularity as a cycling ground, however, waned when the followers of the latest fashion were permitted to ride in Hyde Park up till mid-day. Our picture shows a few of the cyclists, one of whom, a lady, is evidently a novice.

BATTERSEA PARK - (Maps 11 and 12) is on the Surrey side of the river, in the S.W. dist. It is certainly one of the prettiest parks (about 200 acres in extent). No park or garden in London can compare with the sub-tropical garden (4 acres in extent), which is emphatically one of the sights which no visitor should miss, especially in the latter part of the summer. The park contains excellent drives, and is encircled by a superior Rotten Row or prepared ride. There is every accommodation for cricket, football, lawn tennis and bowls, and it is a specially favourite resort for cyclists. Boating may be indulged in on the lake, which adds greatly to the picturesqueness of the ingeniously-planned ground. The park gates are in Albert-rd, Prince of Wales-rd and Victoria-rd, and the fine terrace walk facing the river is directly approached from the steamboat pier. Light refreshments can be obtained in the park, and in the immediate neighbourhood there is also good accommodation. The best way of approaching Battersea from the west is along the Grosvenor-rd and over Chelsea Suspension Bridge, whilst the upper end of the park can be reached from South Kensington over the Albert Suspension Bridge, which crosses the river from the Embankment. NEAREST Ry. Stns., Battersea Park from Victoria or Ludgate-hill, also from Waterloo, Queen's-rd.

Charles Dickens Jr. et al, Dickens Dictionary of London, c.1908 edition
(no date; based on internal evidence)