Victorian London - Markets - Oxford Market

Oxford Market, on the north side of Oxford Street, near John Street, Portland Street, is a small market for the sale of vegetables and butchers' meat.

London Exhibited in 1852, 1852

Old and New London, c.1880

Oxford Market was so called either from the Oxford Road, to which it was adjacent, or more probably, after Harley, Earl of Oxford, the original ground landlord. It was erected in 1721, as shown by the date in the brass vane which surmounts it centre. The vane bears upon it the initials "H.E.H." which are probably those of Edward Lord Harley, and his wife, Henrietta (the heiress of the house of Holles, Duke of Newcastle) who gave the site. It is called by the painter Barry "the most classic of London markets;" but it is certainly difficult to see in what its "classic" nature consists. It was originally a plain hexagonal structure, mostly of wood; this was pulled down, either entirely or to a great extent, about the year 1815, when it was rebuilt, small dwelling-rooms above being added to the shops below. It was the only daughter of the above-named Lord Harley who carried this and other adjoining property by marriage into the family of the Duke of Portland. In February, 1876, the site of the market was disposed of by public auction, the property being purchased for 27,500 by Messrs. Louise and Co.

Old and New London, c.1880