Victorian London - Organisations - Government Departments etc - Home Office

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Home Office.—The Home Office, Whitehall, S.W., undertakes an enormous amount of work in connection with the social government of the country, and contains the following departments: the Factory Department, Whitehall, with a large staff of inspectors, assistant- inspectors and sub - inspectors; Inspectors of Prisons, under the Act of 1877; Reformatory and Industrial Schools, 3, Delahay-street, S.W. Inspectors of Anatomical Schools, 2 St. Martin’s-place, Trafalgar square, W.C.; the Prison Department; the Burial Acts’ Department; Inspectors of Constabulary; Inspectors of Salmon Fisheries and Inspectors of Explosives. NEAREST Railway Station, Westminster-bridge ; Omnibus Routes, Whitehall and Strand; Cab Ranks Horse Guards and Palace Yard.

Charles Dickens (Jr.), Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1879

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - The Foreign and India Offices, from St. James's Park

Foreign and India Office - photograph

THE FOREIGN AND INDIA OFFICES, FROM ST. JAMES'S PARK

The stately pile of public buildings which comprises the Foreign, India, Colonial, and Home Offices, with those of the Local Government Board, is seen to much better advantage from St. James's Park than from Whitehall. It was designed by Sir Gilbert Scott, in the Italian style, cost half a million of money, and was erected during the five years ended 1873. None of the many "lungs " that London can boast is superior in beauty to St. James's Park, and that part of the lake which is shown in our foreground is particularly interesting, for it is reserved as an asylum for the Ornithological Society's collection of water birds. The trees to the right are on Duck Island, where the birds have their nests.

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - Whitehall, with the Home Office

Whitehall and Home Office - photograph

WHITEHALL, WITH THE HOME OFFICE.

An admirable view of the noble Government Offices in Whitehall is obtained from the corner of Parliament Street, whence our photograph is taken. Sir Gilbert Scott designed these buildings, which are in the Italian style, his preference for the Gothic having boon overruled. The only entrance in Whitehall admits to the Home Office. In the less lofty buildings beyond Downing Street are the Education Department, the Treasury, and the Privy Council offices. Beyond Whitehall Gardens, on the right, is the Royal United Service Institution, which embraces the superb Banqueting Hall, built by Inigo Jones for James I., and a new annexe. Whitehall derives its name from the old Palace, of which the Banqueting Hall alone remains.