Victorian London - Publications - History - Views of the Pleasure Gardens of London, by H.A.Rogers, 1896

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Marylebone Gardens

(Circa 1660-1778)

"In rain to Marrobone no Bowler goes."
        -
D'URTEY, Prologue to Massamiello, 1699
"Some Dukes at Marybone bowl time away."
        - LADY M.W.MONTAGU

1761 -An excellent half-sheet engraving, after a drawing made by J. Donowell, published this year, represents Marybone Gardens, probably in their fullest splendour. The centre of this view represents the longest walk, with regular rows of young trees on either side, the stems of which received the irons for the lamps at about the height of seven feet from the ground. On either side this walk were latticed alcoves; on the right hand of the walk, according to this view, stood the bow-fronted orchestra, with balustrades, supported by columns. The roof was extended considerably over the erection, to keep the musicians and singers free from rain. On the left hand of the walk was a room, possibly for balls and suppers. The figures in this view are so well drawn and characteristic of the time, that I am tempted to recommend the particular attention of my reader to it.

- J. T. SMITH'S
Book for a Rainy Day, 1845.


MUSICAL ADDRESS TO THIS TOWN

SUNG AT THE OPENING OF MARYBONE-GARDENS IN 1763

MR. LOWE.

Now the summer advances, and pleasure removes,
From the smoke of the town, to the fields and the groves,
Permit me to hope, that your favours again,
May smile, as before, on this once happy plain.

Miss CATLEY.

Tho' here no rotunda expands the wide dome,
No canal on its borders invites you to roam,
Yet nature some blessings has scatter'd around,
And means to improve may hereafter be found.

Miss MILES.

On spots as uncouth, from foundations as mean
Some structures stupendous exalted have been;
Hence started Vauxhall, and Ranelagh grew,
From rudeness to grandeur, supported by you.

Miss SMITH.

The barrenest heath may by art be improv'd,
And rivers diverted, and mountains remov'd:
Do you then the sunshine of favour display,
And culture shall soon the glad summons obey.

Miss CATLEY.

Meanwhile, every effort to please ye we'll try;

Miss MILES.

Good music, good wine, with each other shall vie,

Miss SMITH.

To gain your esteem's the full scope of our plan,

MR. LOWE.

And we'll try to deserve it as well as we can.

CHORUS.

To gain your esteem's the full scope of' our plan, 
And we'll strive to deserve it as well as we can.

-Gentleman's Magazine, May 1763.


Marybone Gardens

JULY 30th, 1776,
ON ACCOUNT OF
Various Alterations and Additions
MAKING TO THE
ENTERTAINMENTS  prefented to the PUBLIC.
In the Manner  of the AMUSEMENTS on
THE BOULEVARDS
OF
PARIS
The GARDENS cannot be opened till
Thurfday next, 
WHEN THOSE
ENTERTAINMENTS
Which have beer, receivcd with fuch
UNIVERSAL APPLAUSE
Will be again repeated.

(Folio Sheet Poster)


 

AT MARYBONE GARDENS

To-morrow, the 30th inst., will be presented

THE MODERN MAGIC LANTERN

In Three Parts, being an attempt at a Sketch of the Times, in a Variety of Caricatures, accompanied with a whimsical and satirical Dissertation on each Character.

By R. BADDELEY, Comedian.

BILL OF FARE.

EXORDIUM.

PART THE FIRST

A Serjeant at Law
Andrew Marvel, Lady Fribble
A bilking Courtezan
A Modern Widow

A Modern Patriot
A Duelling Apothecary
And a Foreign Quack

PART THE SECOND.

A Man of Consequence
A Hackney Parson
A Macaroni Parson
A Hair Dresser
A Robin Hood Orator

Lady Tit for Tat
An Italian Tooth Drawer
High Life in St. Giles'
A Jockey, and
A Jew's Catechism

And PART THE THIRD will consist of a short Magic Sketch called

PUNCH'S ELECTION.

ADMISSION 2s. 6d. EACH.

Coftee and Tea included.

The Doors to be opened at Seven, and the Exordium to be spoken at Eight o'clock.

VIVANT REX ET REGINA.

(1775.)