Victorian London - Publications - History - Views of the Pleasure Gardens of London, by H.A.Rogers, 1896

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Busby's Folly, Pentonville

LATTERLY CALLED "PENNY'S FOLLY

(1670-1780)

PENNY'S FOLLY, ISLINGTON NEW ROAD

THIS is to inform all Lovers of curious performances and the public in general, That the brother of the famous Mr. Zucker, a High German, who has gained such universal applause, and had the honour of performing before their Majesties and all the Royal Family, is removed to Penny's Folly, Islington New-Road, will exhibit this evening, and continue every evening till further notice, several extraordinary performances never before seen in this kingdom. He has brought with him his Learned Little Horse, from Cowland, whose amazing and wonderful performances have been allowed by the Nobility, Gentry, and others, to exceed anything of the kind ever seen in the known world. He has also engaged the so much admired and unparalleled Mr. Jonas, who will display his matchless and curious deceptions with several of his own and Comus's philosophical performances. Also several of the most favourite airs on the musical glasses by Mrs. Zucker.

N. B.-The doors open at Six o'clock, and begin precisely at half-past Six.

The Room is elegant and airy, and commands a delightful prospect, being fourteen windows in front. The Little Horse will be looking out of the windows up two pair of stairs every evening before the performances begin.

ADMITTANCE, ONE SHILLING ONLY.

(Circa 1769.)


PHILIP JONAS informs the Public, in answer to a challenge of Mr. Jonas of the Penny Folly, that he shall be ready to perform against him by Thursday, at the Penny Folly, Islington, at four o'clock in the evening, and the performances of horse and glass at the same time in the evening. Admittance One Shilling.

- Advertisement, 8th August 1769