Victorian London - Publications - Social Investigation/Journalism - "Police-Duty" Catechism and Reports, by H. Childs, 1903

"POLICE DUTY" CATECHISM AND REPORTS

BY
H. CHILDS, F.R.HIST.S.

AUTHOR OF
"SELF-EDUCATION FOR THE POLICE"; "THE USEFUL SPELLING BOOK," AND "PUNCTUATION AND POLICE ESSAYS."

FIFTH EDITION

COPYRIGHT

LONDON 
H.CHILDS, 3. CASTLE STREET, LONG ACRE, W.C.
1903


CONTENTS.

    ADVERTISEMENTS, ETC.  ; ASSAULTS, RIOT, ETC. ; BETTING, ETC. ; BICYCLES, ETC. ; BURGLARY, HOUSEBREAKING, ETC. ; COUNTERFEIT COIN CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, ETC.  ;  DEAD BODIES, ETC.  ;  DESERTERS, ETC. EXPLOSIVES, GUNS, ETC. FELONY, ETC.   ;  HACKNEY AND STAGE CARRIAGES  ;  HAWKERS AND PEDLARS   ;  INFANT LIFE PROTECTION ACT  ;  LICENSING ACT, 1902   ;  LOCOMOTIVES, ETC.   ;  LIGHT LOCOMOTIVES   ;  LUNATICS, ETC.  ;  MARINE STORE DEALERS   ; NUISANCES, ETC., AND COSTERMONGERS  ;  PAWNBROKERS, ETC.   ;  POLICE, ETC.   ;  PUBLIC-HOUSES PREVENTION OF CRIMES ACT  ;  SWEEPS, ETC. TRAMS, ETC.  ;  WOMEN AND CHILDREN MISCELLANEOUS INFECTIOUS DISEASES  WITHIN METROPOLIS FOR SCOTCH POLICE  ;  FULLY WRITTEN REPORTS  ;   SPECIMEN SUMMONSES  ;  PARTICULARS OF A "BOILER EXPLOSION" REQUIRED BY BOARD OF TRADE


[-1-]

ADVERTISEMENTS AND INDECENT EXPOSURE, ETC.

    Ques. What is the regulation size of boards which are permitted to be carried about the public streets?
    Ans. 20 inches in breadth and 32 inches deep.
    Ques. What is the distance that must be kept between each man carrying advertisement-boards?
    Ans. 30 yards.
    Ques. Where must the boards he carried?
    Ans. In the carriage-way, clear of the kerb.
    Ques. What would you do if you saw a H. C. or M. S. C. plying for hire with bills stuck on the windows so as to obstruct the light, or cause annoyance to passengers? (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, S. 15.)
    Ans. Take number of carriage, name and address of proprietor, No. of conductors badge, number and description of bills, and report the proprietor with a view to his being summoned.
    Ques. You see a carriage passing through a main thoroughfare, covered with bills advertising a play at a theatre. There are men inside giving out handbills to the public, and a great obstruction is caused. What steps would you take?
    Ans. inquire if permission had been granted by Commissioner if not, then take names and addresses of all the men employed with the carriage, also their employer's name ouch address, and report with a view to proceedings by summons.
    Ques.  You see an obscene print exhibited in a shop window for sale: what would you do?
    Ans. Report the facts, and await special directions from Commissioner.
    Ques. What would you do if you saw a man offering obscene prints for sale in the street, or even exhibiting? 
    [-2-] Ans. Take him into custody.
    Ques. Your attention is called by a gentleman to a man who is distributing handbills; he states that they are of an obscene nature - what steps?
    Ans. Keep him under observation, and if possible, procure a bill which I saw him distribute, and providing it bore words or drawings of an obscene character, I should take him into custody and charge him with the offence.
    Ques. Name some advertisements declared to be indecent.
    Ans. Any advertisement relating to syphilis, gonorrhoea, nervous debility, or other complaints of infirmity relating to sexual intercourse, when publicly posted up, exhibited, distributed, or attempted to be distributed.
    Ques. When would it be an offence to post up or write an indecent advertisement upon anything whatever?
    Ans. When the indecent advertisement would be visible to a person passing along any street, highway or footpath.
    Ques. In what case would it be an offence, even although an indecent advertisement could not be seen from a street, highway or footpath?
    Ans. If the indecent advertisement were posted up in a public urinal.
    Ques. In what two other places would it be an offence to put an indecent advertisement?
    Ans. In the window of a shop or house where it would he exhibited to public view, or down the area of a house.
    Ques. Describe the most penal offence under the Act. 
    Ans. Giving indecent advertisements to another person with the intent that they should be posted up, exhibited or distributed.
    Ques. What are your powers of arrest under this Act? 
    Ans. I have power to arrest any person whom I find committing any offence against this Act.
    Ques. What is the definition of "public place" within the Gaming and Indecent Exposure Acts?
    Ans. A place where the public go, although they have no right of access to the place, but have been in the habit of trespassing without interference.
    Ques. You see a man bathing in a pond so near to a public highway that he is exposing his person - would you charge him?
    Ans. Yes, on condition that I could prove an intent to insult females; if not, caution him.
    [-3-] Ques. What are disorderly houses?
    Ans. Common bawdy-houses, gaming-houses, brothels, betting-houses, and disorderly houses of entertainment. (25 Geo II., C. 36, S. 5.)
    Ques. Who must complain of a disorderly house (except a brothel) before action can be taken?
   Ans. Two inhabitants, who must make an information upon oath, and enter into a recognisance to prosecute. (25 Geo. II, C. 36, S5.)
    Ques. Who must complain of a brothel before action can be taken?
    Ans. The neighbouring inhabitants, who would complain to the Vestry Authorities, and the Vestry to the Police for summary action. (48 and 49 Vic., C. 69, S. 13.)
    Ques. May advertisements by bills be affixed to Vestry street-lamps
    Ans. No. (25 and 26 Vic., C. 102, S. 90.)

ASSAULTS, RIOT, ETC.

    The following acts amount to assault:


   1. Kissing a person against his or her consent.
   2. Cutting another's dress through without touching or intending to touch the wearer. (R. v. Day.)
   3. Setting a dog at another. (I Russ. Cr., 958.)
   4. Spitting in a person's face; pushing a third person against him. (6 Mod., 172, 149.)
   5. If a person advances with clenched fists to strike another, but the blow is not delivered owing to a third person holding the intending striker, an assault is committed. (Stephens v. Myers, 4 C. and P., 349.)
   6. Presenting a loaded fire-arm.
    Ques. Would it be an assault if a number of workmen tuck up their sleeves and threaten to break a man's neck if he does not go out of the place, and frighten him to do so?
    Ans. Yes. (Read v. Coker.)
    Ques. If a bailiff went to a house, intending to distrain, and without announcing his intention, put his foot within the door to keep it open, and was pushed out with blows, would the persons be liable for assaulting him in the execution of his duty?
    Ans. No. It was held that the defendant did know the bailiff's business, and as the latter had no right to force his way inside, he was not in the execution of his duty, and [-4-]  the defendant was justified. (Broughton v. Wilkerson, 44 J.P., 781.)
    Ques. Is an exhibition of skill in sparring illegal?
    Ans. No.
   Ques. But if the parties fight on and punish each other severely, who is to decide whether it is a prize-fight or not?
    Ans. A jury. (R. v. Orton, 43 J.P., 72.)
    Ques What is the best way to prevent a prize-fight, of which information is obtained beforehand?
    Ans. To secure the combatants beforehand and take them to a magistrate, who ought to compel them to enter into securities to keep the peace till the next assizes or sessions; and if they will not enter into such security, to commit them to prison. (Justice Burrough in R. v. Bell.)
    Ques.  Is a constable bound in the execution of his duty to assist the occupier of a house to put out an intruder? Should the intruder resist, can he be convicted of resisting a constable in the execution of his duty?
   Ans. He may do so; but the intruder, if he resists, would only be convicted of an assault, as force was lawfully used to eject him. (R. v. Roxburgh, 12 Cox, 8.)
    Ques.  If a warrant has been issued to apprehend a person for an offence less than a felony, and while effecting his apprehension a P.C. is assaulted, what is necessary to be proved before the person can be charged with assaulting the P.C. in the execution of his duty?
    Ans. That the P. C. had the warrant in his possession, and, if possible. backed. (Galliard v. Laxton; R. v. Cumption, 40 J.P, 566.)
    Ques.  What is the penalty imposed for assaults on police or other officers engaged on the river Thames, and by what Act is it imposed?
    Ans. 5. (Thames Conservancy Act, 1864; 27 and 28 Vic, C.113, S. 75.)
    Ques. Is it a criminal assault if the rider of a bicycle by riding in a furious and reckless manner knocks down and injures a person or persons?
    Ans. No. (Ackroyd v. Barrett.) The rider may be liable to an action.
    Ques.  If a person wilfully and wantonly disturbs any inhabitant by pulling or ringing any door-bell or knocking at any door without lawful excuse, or wilfully and unlawfully extinguishes the light of any lamp, before a constable can arrest, what must be first proved?
    [-5-] Ans. That it was done within his view. (2 and 3 Vic., C. 47.)
    Ques. What evidence is necessary to justify an arrest for " assault"?
    Ans. Recent marks of violence, to corroborate the accusation ; also when committed in the presence of police.
    Ques.  If an affray is made in a house, may a constable break open the house to suppress it
    Ans. Yes, if within his view or hearing. (2 Hale, 95.)
    Ques. Under what circumstances may a private person legally break and enter a person's house?
    Ans. To prevent murder, if cries for assistance are heard. (Handcock v. Baker.)
    Ques. What is the difference between "murder" and "manslaughter"?
    Ans. "Murder" is where a person of sound memory and discretion unlawfully killeth any reasonable creature with malice aforethought, either express or implied. "Manslaughter" is the unlawful killing of another without malice, either express or implied. (Lord Coke.)
    Ques. Could a man, who by threats caused his wife to be in such a state of terror that she got out of the window to escape, and fell and broke her leg, be charged? If so, with what?
    Ans. Yes ; with unlawfully and maliciously inflicting grievous bodily harm. It is a misdemeanour.
    Ques. If a person purposely alters a railway signal, is he liable? If so, what would he be charged with ?
    Ans. Yes ; that he unlawfully obstructed, or caused to be obstructed, engines and carriages of that railway.
    Ques. If a number of persons combined to hiss a play off the stage, what could they be charged with?
    Ans. Conspiracy. (Common Law.)
    Ques. What is au "unlawful assembly"?
    Ans. Any meeting whatsoever of great numbers of people with such circumstances of terror as cannot but endanger the public peace, and raise fears and jealousies among the King's subjects ; as where great numbers complaining of a common grievance meet together armed in a war-like manner, in order to consult together concerning the most proper means for the recovery of their interests for no one can foresee what may be the event of such an assembly. (Lord Thring, K.C.B., 1899.)
    Ques. What is "riot"?
    [-6-] Ans. A tumultuous disturbance of the peace by three or more persons assembling together of their own authority with an intent mutually to assist one another against any who oppose them, in the execution of some enterprise of a private nature, and afterwards actually executing the same in a violent and turbulent manner to the terror of the people.
    Ques. If twelve or more persons are riotously assembled together one hour after the Riot Act has been read, how are they charged
    Ans. As felons. (Riot Act.)
    Ques. If certain words are omitted when reading the Riot Act, the proclamation has no effect. What are they?
    Ans. "God save the King."
    Ques. If a riotous crowd were smashing shop-windows and stealing articles therefrom, what steps would you take?
    Ans. Obtain police assistance and arrest as many offenders as possible. Wire to Commissioner and Receiver without delay.
    Ques. What steps would you take on receiving notice that a riot has taken place, and that shops had been looted and damaged?
    Ans. Immediately send a telegram to Commissioner and Receiver, also immediately report full details with reference thereto in duplicate.
    Ques. Under what circumstances only can a writ or warrant be executed on Sunday?
    Ans. For treason, felony, breach of the peace or misdemeanour and for any indictable offence (11 and 12 Vic., C.42).
    Ques. What is wounding?
    Ans. A "battery" in which the flesh is opened ; a mere scratch may constitute a wounding. (Archibald.)
    Ques. What is battery?
    Ans The actual commission of an injury, be it ever so small, done to the person of another in an angry, revengeful or spiteful manner. ( Purcell v. Horn.)
    Ques. When is a person justified in committing an assault?
    Ans. When it is necessary to defend himself from injury by another person ; he need not wait until he is actually struck. (Archibald.)
    Ans. Also churchwardens and private persons may gently lay their hands on persons who disturb Divine service, and turn them out of church. Also a coroner may use force to clear his court during an inquest, if necessary. (Burns, J.P., vol. 1.)

[-7-]

BETTING, ETC.

    Ques. It comes to your knowledge that facilities are being given, by fixing telegraphic instruments on licensed premises, for betting purposes what steps would you take
    Ans. I should report all particulars coming to my knowledge, and the landlord would be cautioned by an inspector that if facilities for betting were given, such steps would be taken by the Commissioner as the facts might warrant, either by summons or by opposing renewal of the licence.
    Ques. A householder complains to you about a man taking bets from men near his premises ; they are located within the Metropolis - what steps?
    Ans. I should get a description of the bookmaker and keep observation. Should I see two go up to him at the same time and make bets, I should apprehend the bookmaker. Otherwise I should report facts of complaint. If possible, apprehend all three men. (30 and 31 Vic., C. 134. S. 23.)
    Ques. Can you arrest under Sec. 23 (above) for obstruction by betting outside the Metropolis?
    Ans. No. The Act is not applicable. Proceed by summons under by-laws of county in which the offence is committed.
    Ques. Can you take any action against anyone who frequents any street, etc., for the purpose of betting ? Is there any power of arrest without warrant for it ? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. Yes, by summons. No ; no power of arrest (L.C.C. Order, 1888 89).
    Ques. What constitutes obstruction by betting in the Street?
    Ans. Three or more persons assembled together. (30 and 31 Vic., C. 134, S. 23.)
    Ques. Within what distance of London is horse-racing illegal, unless licensed ? and who grants the licence?
    Ans. Within ten miles. (42 and 43 Vic., C. 18.) London County Council. (51 and 52 Vic., C. 41, S. 3)
    Ques. What constitutes horse-racing?
    Ans. Any race in which any horse, mare, or gelding shall run or be made to run in competition with any other horse, mare, or gelding, or against time, for any prize of what nature or kind soever, or for any bet or wager made or to he made in respect of any such horse, mare, or gelding, or the riders thereof, and at which more than twenty persons shall he present. (Race-courses' Licensing Act, 1879.)
    [-8-]  Ques. What do the words "persons resorting thereto" mean?
    Ans. Persons actually coming to the premises, and do not include those who merely send messages or telegrams. (R. v. Brown.)
    Ques. If a person sends a circular to a person under age inviting him to borrow money from the one who sent it, of what is he guilty?
    Ans. A misdemeanour.
    Ques. But what must be first proved, in above question?
    Ans. That the sender knew the person was an "infant"; and that he did it for earning commission, interest, reward, or other profit. (55 and 56 Vict., C. 4.)
    Ques. If persons were gambling in a railway carriage, while on a journey, would they be liable?
    Ans. Yes ; such a carriage is a place to which the public have or are permitted to have access. (Langrish v. Archer, 10 Q.B D., 44.)
    Ques. If you see a person offering bills, etc., wholly relating to betting, what would you do?
    Ans. Procure a copy of bill, take his name and address and report for summons.

BICYCLES, ETC.

    Ques. During what time is a bicyclist bound to have his lamp alight?
    Ans. During the period between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise.
    Ques. When may a tricycle be said to be a locomotive ?
    Ans. When propelled by steam. (Parkins v. Priest, 72 B.D., 313.)
    Ques. What are the regulations for bicycles and tricycles ?
   Ans. (a) During the period between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise every person riding or being upon such carriage shall carry attached to the carriage a lamp, which shall be so constructed and placed as to exhibit a light in the direction in which he is proceeding, and so lighted and kept lighted as to afford adequate means of signalling the approach or position of the carriage. (b) Upon overtaking any cart or carriage, or any horse, mule, or other beast of burden, or any foot-passenger, being on or proceeding along the carriage-way, every such person shall within a reasonable distance from and before passing such cart or carriage, horse, [-9-] mule, or other beast of burden, or such foot-passenger, by sounding a bell or whistle, or otherwise, give audible and sufficient warning of the approach of the carriage. Penalty not exceeding 40s. (51 and 52 Vic., c. 41.)
   Ques. Under what circumstances is a "bicycle" considered to be a "carriage"?
    Ans. Under the Acts which relate to traffic and within the Highway Acts. (51 and 52 Vic., c 41.)
    Ques. When is a "bicycle" not considered to be a "carriage"?
    Ans. For purpose of toll. (Williams v. Ellis, 44 J.P., 394.) 
   Ques. If you wanted to stop a cyclist for any offence, how should you do it?
   Ans. If possible, seize hold of the framework at the rear of machine.
    Ques. What does the term "sunset" mean?
    Ans. The time at which the sun actually sets at the place in question, and not the time given for Greenwich in the Almanac. (Gordon v. Cann, 68 L.J., Q.B., 434.)
    Ques. Where a person is charged with riding a bicycle on a footway, what is not necessary to be proved?
    Ans. Any injury to such highway, or injury, interruption, or personal danger to any person travelling thereon. (Brotherton v. Tittensor, 60 J.P., 72.)

BURGLARY AND HOUSEBREAKING, ETC.

    Ques. Between what hours would breaking into a dwelling-house be deemed a burglary?
    Ans. Between 9 p.m. and 6 am. Between 6 am. and 9 p.m. it would be housebreaking.
    Ques. Where any violence is used in connection with a case of burglary, how is it to be described?
    Ans. It is to be described as a "burglary with violence."
    Ques. You see a man walking along carrying a hand-bag, and your suspicions are aroused as to the genuineness of its contents - what would you do?
   Ans. I should stop and question him as to its contents. If he declined to open the bag and to answer any such question I thought necessary, I should take him into custody. 
    (The bag could only be opened by force by direction of a magistrate.)
    Ques. A burlary has been committed, and the offender gets clear away, but in making off he crosses a garden in which he leaves prints of his boots. A man is subsequently [-10-] arrested on suspicion. How would you act so as to ascertain whether the print of arrested man's boot corresponded with those in garden?
    Ans. Make a separate impression with the shoe or boot and compare; also take great care to prevent people from walking near the prints required for comparison.
    Ques. What is "robbery"?
    Ans. Theft accompanied with violence or threats of violence to any person or property, intentionally used to extort the property stolen, or to prevent or overcome resistance to its being stolen.
    Ques. What is "sacrilege"?
    Ans. The breaking and entering of a place of Divine worship and committing a felony therein, or, having committed a felony therein, breaking out. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 96, S. 50.)
    Ques. If a constable saw a man carrying stolen goods in the street, and before he could arrest him the man carried them into his house, would P.C. be justified in following him into the house and arresting him?
    Ans Yes; the power to arrest which accrued in the street was not lost by the man entering his own or another house. (R v. Fisher, 39 J.P., 612.)
    Ques. If a window is partly opened, but not sufficient to admit a person, would the raising of it so as to admit a person be a "breaking into" or "burglary"?
    Ans. No. (R. v. Smith.)
    Ques. What is a "dwelling-house"?
    Ans. A house in which some person habitually dwells.
    Ques. Iii the ease of a burglary or house-breaking having been committed, what should be done by police
    Ans. A superior officer should go to the premises, obtain all particulars as to entry, description, and value of property stolen, also of any suspicious persons, loitering near. If necessary, telegraph particulars to C.O. for circulation and for insertion in "Informnations " and Pawnbrokers' List. (Metropolitan.)
    Ques. What crimes are to he reported by telegram to Assistant Commissioner C.I.D.? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. Serious offences, such as murder, manslaughter, or big burglary, and the offender has not been apprehended on the spot.
    Ques. What is an "actual breaking"?
   Ans. Opening the casement, or breaking the glass window, [-11-] picking open a lock with a false key, or putting back the lock with a knife or dagger, unlatching a door that is only latched. (Lord Hale.)
   Ques. What does to " break " mean?
    Ans. To break any part, internal or external, of a building, or to open by any means whatever (including lifting in the case of things kept in their places by their own weight), any door, window, shutter, cellar flap, or other thing intended to cover openings to the building, or give passage from one part of it to another. (Criminal Code, 1879.)
    Ques. What is "entering"?
    Ans. Getting any part of the body of the person making the entry, into a building; or putting in a hook or other implement to reach out goods ; or puts a pistol in at the window with an intent to kill, though the hand be not within the building. (1 Hale 555.)
    Ques.  In burglary, must the "breaking" and "entering" take place on the same night?
    Ans. No. The "breaking" may be on one night, and the entering on another. (R. v. Smith.)

COUNTERFEIT COIN.

    Ques. When does counterfeit coin uttering amount to a felony?
    Ans. On a second offence of uttering after a previous conviction. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 99, S. 12.)
    Ques. What would you do if a person was given into custody to prevent him from disposing of counterfeit coin which he may have in his possession.
    Ans. Search him immediately in the presence of the complainant, if possible ; if not, take such precautions as would prevent him disposing of any such coins he may have in his possession.
    Ques. If a magistrate was not satisfied that a counterfeit coin found on prisoner was base, what would you do?
    Ans. Take the coin to be tested to the nearest silversmith or chemist, and present the bill of expenses to the nmagistrate, on whose requisition the Treasury Solicitor would allow them.
    Ques. If a prisoner is remanded for uttering counterfeit coins, what steps would you take?
    Ans. Forward the coin or coins to the Treasury to be properly tested, also attend at Treasury Solicitor's office with [-12-] a copy of the charge, for inquiries to be made regarding former convictions, etc.
    Ques. May a person make imitation British copper coins?
    Ans. No ; it is a felony. (24 and 25 Vic., c. 99)
    Ques. If a person has uttered or tendered a counterfeit coin at a shop, could he be charged? If so, under what conditions?
    Ans. Yes. If he had in his possession other counterfeit coins, or had with intent within ten days from the first "uttering" again tendered a false coin. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 99.)
    Ques. Must a person "utter" counterfeit coin before he can be charged?
    Ans. No. If he has three or more counterfeit gold or silver coins in his possession with intent to utter or put off the same or any of them, he can be charged, and it is a misdemeanour. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 99)
    Ques.  If you were called by a tradesman to a man who had attempted to pass a counterfeit dorm on him, what steps would you take?
    Ans. At once search the accused in the shop and in complainant's presence, if possible, and if other counterfeit coin be found on him, take possession of it and initial it. See that he does not make away with any coins, etc., while searching or taking him to station.
    Ques. If a person is arrested for uttering, possessing, or being in any way connected with the manufacture of counterfeit, what is to he specially done?
    Ans. Report by telegram full particulars of the case to Assistant Commissioner, C.I D. (Metropolitan.)
    Ques. For what offence are you justified in searching a prisoner as soon as you take him into custody?
    Ans. Having counterfeit coin, or uttering same.
    Ques. Would it be an "uttering and putting off" if a person wilfully gave a counterfeit coin to a charity.
    Ans. Yes. (R. v. Page, 8 C. and P. 122)
    Ques.  Would it be an "uttering " if a genuine sovereign had been fraudulently filed at the edges so as to reduce it in weight?
    Ans. Yes. (R. v. Hermann, 4 Q.B.D., 284.)
    Ques. What is not necessary to be proved in the case of a person having counterfeit coin "dies" in his possession?
    [-13-] Ans. The intent to make counterfeit coin; nor that money was actually made with them. (Ridgelay's case.)

CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, ETC.

    Ques. What does the word "animal" mean in this Act?
    Ans. Any bird, beast, fish, or reptile, which is not included in the Cruelty to Animals Acts, 1849 and 1854.
    Ques. What is the main provision of this Act?
    Ans. Any person who cruelly beats, ill-treats, over-drives, abuses, or tortures any animal, or causes, or procures such to be done, shall be guilty of an offence.
    Ques. In dealing with a case of cruelty to animals, what should you be careful to do?
    Ans. To observe and note in writing the exact nature of the cruelty, the condition of the animal and the character of its wounds, their situation, and, especially if old, if discharging, and in contact with harness, which should be examined for adhering particles of matter and dried blood. Also get the name and address of one or more respectable witnesses willing to give supporting evidence.
    Ques. If the case is one of overloading, what  must be shown?
    Ans. Painful distress of the animal, such as trembling, falling, unusual perspiration or exhaustion, or else violence on part of the driver.
    Ques. In every case what should be carefully observed and remembered?
    Ans. The exact words of accused when stopped, as they frequently amount to an admission of guilt.
    Ques. What are your powers of arrest under the Cruelty to Animals Act?
    Ans. I have power to arrest any person whom I see committing an offence against this Act, also upon the complaint of any other person who gives his name and address.
    Ques. What are the duties of police respecting a serious accident to a horse in the street?
    Ans. The police officer present is (if the owner is absent or refuses) to at once send for a veterinary surgeon, who is to be requested to bring anaesthetics, which he is to use if he considers necessary, if the animal is not to be killed. If he certifies that it ought to be killed, then the officer, without waiting for the consent of the owner, is to at once take steps to have it killed, first asking the vet, to do so; if he refuses to do so, send for a cattle or horse slaughterer. But a horse [-14-] slaughterer should be sent for to remove the carcase. Vet.'s fee 10s. 6d., cattle slaughterer 5s. No fee to horse slaughterer if called to kill and remove.
    Ques. A horse suffering from a sore shoulder is found working in a public carriage - what steps would you take?
    Ans. I should see that the harness did not rub the sore, take the number of carriage, owner's name and address, also driver's badge number, and direct the driver to take it home. I should immediately acquaint the officer on duty at station, who would supply me with Form No. - on which I should enter particulars, height, colour distinguishing points of animal, which would then be submitted through the Superintendent to P.C.O. A telegram is sent in gross cases where driver is charged with cruelty.
    Ques. If a householder complained to you of a noisy animal in a neighbour's garden, what should you do?
    Ans. Inform him that he should go to the station with two other householders similarly annoyed, to fill in the necessary notice which has to he served on the owner of animal before proceedings can be taken.
    Ques. Information is given you that a horse is suffering from glanders - what steps would you take?
   Ans. I should immediately send notice to the Veterinary Inspector of the Local Authority and to the station, and see that the affected animal is isolated.
    Ques. Information is received at the station that pigs are suffering from swine fever - what steps would you take?
    Ans. (1) Immediately give notice to the local authorities; (2) see that the affected animals are separated from other animals; (3) send a postal telegram to the Board of Agriculture, 4, Whitehall Place, SW., embodying the following information Full name of owner of premises, and name of premises where disease exists ; name of district, whether county or borough ; name and address of sender.
    (Telegrams sent by a police officer will be accepted free of charge at any post office in Great Britain, if with the words "On Service of Board of Agriculture," followed by name of sender in full, the word "Police" being written in space provided for postage stamps.)
    Ques. If a person took a horse suffering from glanders through the public street, well knowing that it was so suffering, could he be charged?
    Ans. Yes if his name and address are not known to the [-15-] P.C. and such person fails to give them to the satisfaction of the P.C.
    Ques. During what hours are cattle prohibited from being driven through the general limits?
   Ans. Between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. In the parish of Islington between 12pm. Saturday and 12p.m.Sunday.
   Ques. If a P.C. is required by a person to take another person into custody for cruelty to an animal not committed in the P.C.'s view, what should he do?
    Ans. Either inquire into all particulars or see the animal, so as to form an opinion of what has occurred before apprehending offender. (12 and 13 Vic., C.. 92.)
    Ques. If a person wanted to obtain a licence for keeping a slaughter-house for cattle not used for butcher's meat, what must he do first?
    Ans. Give one month's notice to Borough Council, Vestry or District Board.
    Ques. If you received information that a boat proceeding along the river is laden with cattle suffering from pleuro-pneumonia, what steps would you take?
    Ans. Stop the boat and satisfy myself that the cattle were so infected; require the boat to be forthwith taken back to or into any place or district wherefrom or whereout it was unlawfully removed, and execute and enforce it; give notice to local authority, and to Director, Veterinary Department, Board of Agriculture, London, SW. (Pleuro-Pneumonia Order, 1891.)
    Ques. If birds (linnets) are kept in a state of captivity, and trained as decoy birds for bird catching, are they domestic animals?
    Ans. Yes. (Colam v. Paget, 48 J.P., 263.)
    Ques. Under the "Wild Animals in Captivity Protection Act, 1900," what are you not allowed to do?
    Ans. Not to apprehend the offender, except by warrant, but you must proceed by summons. 
    Ques. Who can be indicted for a summons under the above Act?
    Ans. Those who cause or permit the cruelty.
    Ques. Is it all offence to terrify a decoy bird, used by bird-catchers, by throwing a net over it?
    Ans. Yes.
   
Ques. What is the general close season for the protection of wild birds?
   [-16-] Ans. From March 1st to August 1st.
   Ques. Within the Metropolitan police district what are the variations of the close season?
    NOTE.- Nearly all birds are now protected during the whole of the year in the county of London.
Ans. County of London, February 1st to August 31st; County of Middlesex, Februmary 1st to August 31st ; County of Hertford, February 15th to August 15th ; County of Essex, March 15th to August 1st.
   Ques. If you see a person decoying birds with appliances, what would you do?
    Ans. Seize all appliances, take name and address of person, produce appliances at court on the hearing of the summons.

DEAD BODIES, ETC.

    Ques. You find the dead body of a man (unknown) in the street, on whom it is not considered necessary to hold an inquest - within how many days would you attend at the office and register his death?
    Ans. Five days. (37 and 38 Vic., C. 88, S. 11.)
    Ques. A doctor who holds a coroner's warrant to hold a post-mortem examination on a dead body, appeals to you to assist him in gaining admission, as the door is locked against him at the house where the body lies, and the occupiers threaten him with violence - what action would you take?
    Ans. I should accompany him to the house, and during such examination I should remain and act if a breach of the peace were committed. He, on being refused admission, may use whatever force is necessary to reach the body by breaking open doors.
    (Any person holding a coroner's warrant may break open doors to get at the body, and those obstructing him are guilty of a misdemeanour.)
   Ques. May police remove dead bodies from private houses on request of householder ? If not, whose duty is it?
   Ans. (1) No except in very exceptional circumstances on superintendent's instruction, when the police ambulance may be used if desired;  (2) the parochial authorities and coroners officer.
    Ques. From what places may police remove dead bodies?
    Ans. From the streets and other public places where police perform duty, and when applicationis made from public gardens, railways, at places of amusement, and any locality where they may be exposed to public view.
   [-17-]
    Ques. In the case of a death by violent means, what steps should be taken?
    Ans. Remain by the body until properly relieved; send messenger for inspector and divisional surgeon ; not allow the body to be moved, or room or place or anything about it to be interfered with; exclude the public, amid give no information to public except by permission of superior officer.
    Ques. If the relatives and friends of a deceased man refused to bury the body, what should be done?
    Ans. The Board of Guardians of the district are to bury it, and recover the expenses in a summary manner from any person legally liable to pay the expenses (54 and 55 Vic. C. 76).

DESERTERS, ETC.

    Ques. If a young seaman left his ship without leave and joined the Royal Navy, could he be charged with desertion?
    Ans. No. (Merchant Service Act, 1854, S. 214.)
    Ques. What steps would you take if you saw a number of sandwich-men wearing uniforms similar to those worn by any regiment of H.M. Army?
    Ans. Take men's names and addresses, also that of employer, and report for summons.
    Ques. Are such uniforms allowed to be used in a stage play?
    Ans. Yes.
    Ques. Under what circumstances would you send a naval deserter back to his ship, without being brought before a magistrate?
    Ans. If police held a warrant for his arrest, and there is no doubt as to his identity.
    Ques. What steps would you take if a seaman's discharge was found and brought to the station?
    Ans. If not claimed within seven days, forward it to the Superintendent, Mercantile Marine Office.
    Ques. If a man came to you and said he was a deserter from the army, which you subsequently find to be false, what would you charge him with?
    Ans. With falsely confessing himself to be a deserter. (44 and 45 Vic., C. 86, S. 152.)
    Ques. If some soldier's clothing was found and brought to the station, what would you do?
    Ans. Send them to the Inspector of Clothing, Royal Clothing Department, Pimlico, and obtain a receipt.
    [-19-] 
    Ques. If you have a sailor in custody in uniform, and the police-van is not available, how would you take him to the Police Court?
   Ans. In a cab.
   Ques. If you saw a man whom you know to he a deserter standing at the street door of a house, and on your approach he enters and closes the door, what steps would you take, supposing you do not hold a warrant for his apprehension?
    Ans. Knock at door, inform occupier what had transpired, and request permission to enter and effect the man's apprehension. Should the occupier decline to do so, make a full report with a view to a warrant being speedily applied for. (47 Vic., C. 8, S. 6; Army Act, 1884.)
    Ques. If a man in custody, charged with an offence, has in his possession a quantity of naval uniform, what should you do?
    Ans. Submit report to Commissioner without delay for inquiries to be made at Admiralty to ascertain whether he is a deserter or not. If brought before magistrate before inquiries have been made, apply for a remand.
    Ques. If any article of Royal Marine clothing comes into the possession of the police, what is to be done with it? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. Taken to the Admiralty Recruiting Department, 22, Spring Gardens, and a receipt obtained for it.
    Ques. If "arms" or articles of equipment come into the hands of the police, what should be done with them? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. Forwarded to the Army Ordnance Department, Tower of London.
    Ques. Suppose a cab driver, or bus or tram conductor found any kind of military clothing or arms in their vehicles, and handed them to the police, what should be done with then? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. Forwarded to the Lost Property Office, with the deposit sheet in the same manner as all other property found in public carriages.

EXPLOSIVES, GUNS, ETC.

    Ques. What is an explosive?
    Ans. Gunpowder, nitro-glycerine, dynamite, gun-cotton, blasting powders, fulminate of mercury, or of other metals, coloured fires, and every other substance, whether similar to those above mentioned or not, used or manufactured with a [-19-] view to produce a practical effect by explosion or a pyrotechnic effect ; also fog-signals, fireworks, fuses, rockets, percussion caps, detonators, cartridges ammunition of all descriptions, and every adaptation or preparation as above defined. (38 and 39 Vic., C. 17.)
    Ques. Does a person holding a licence or certificate to kill game require a gun licence?
    Ans. No. (S. 7, S.-S. 3.)
    Ques. If a person carrying a gun declined to produce a licence on being requested, and you took him into custody, what would he be charged with, and how would you act?
    Ans. I should charge him with refusing his name and address when found carrying a gun for which he could produce no authority on my demand. After the magistrate had dealt with the offence of refusal of name and address, I should report the case in the usual way for the information of the Secretary of the Inland Revenue.
    Ques. When may you enter upon lands or premises for the purpose of enforcing this Act?
    Ans. When I see a person using or carrying a gum upon the lands or premises ; but I cannot enter a dwelling-house or its curtilage.
    Ques. Name a few practical points to be kept in mind in carrying out the provisions of the Gun Licence Act?
    Ans. (1) I have no power to arrest a man for merely carrying a gun without a licence or other authority. (2) I have no power to seize guns under this Act. (3) I should never demand a game certificate where a gun licence is produced, as I have no duty to discharge as to whether persons have or have not licences to kill game.  (4) I should not enter upon private lands merely in expectation of meeting with persotms contravening the Act. 
    Ques. What is the least quantity of gunpowder allowed to be sold loose?
    Ans. One pound. (38 and 39 Vic., C. 17, S. 32.)
    Ques. If it exceeds one pound, under what conditions must it be sold?
    Ans. It must be in a substantial case or canister, made and closed so as to prevent it escaping. (S. 30.)
    Ques. Who grants gunpowder licences?
    Ans. The "local authorities," and the premises must be registered annually. Should the licence not be renewed within twelve months, application must be made for a new one. (S. 21)
    [-20-] 
    Ques. What amount is permitted to be kept on substantially built premises, or in a fireproof safe apart from a dwelling-house, or at a reasonable distance from a public place? (S. 22, S.-S. 2A.) 
    Ans. 200 lb.
    Ques. What is a "gun"?
    Ans. A fire-arm of any description, which includes an air- un, or any other kind of gun from which any shot, bullet, or other missile can be discharged. A boy's small pocket pistol has been held to be a firearm. (33 and 34 Vic., C. 57, S 7.)
    Ques. Where can a person carry a gun without a licence?
    Ans. Within a dwelling-house or the curtilage thereof, which includes out-buildings, offices, yards, and enclosed ground adjoining the house.
    Ques. Does a railway company require a licence to store fog signals? What must they prove?
    Ans. No. They must prove that they are for use on the railway. (C. 17, S. 50.)
    Ques. Under what circumstances can a wife give evidence against her husband? (46 and 47 Vic., C. 3)
    Ans. In the case of the husband making or having possession of explosives under suspicious circumstances.
    Ques. What would you do if you saw a licensed hawker selling fireworks from house to house? (38 and 39 Vic., C. 17, S. 30.)
    Ans. I should require to see his licence and copy particulars thereof and see that the name on licence corresponded with such on side of cart; also obtain a description of the fireworks and report for summons.
    Ques. Under what age is it illegal to sell gunpowder to a child?
    Ans. Thirteen years of age.
    Ques. You see a man whom you know is a farmer, and who resides about a mile from his farm, carrying a gun along the public highway; you know that he has no licence - what would you do?
    Ans. I should inquire where he was going, and what he was going to do with the gun. Should he reply, "To my farm to scare the birds," such answer would be sufficient not to justify legal proceedings. (33 and 34 Vic., C. 57, S-S. 4.)
    Ques. How much gunpowder may be kept inside a dwelling, or in a building other than mentioned in last question? (S. 22, S.-S. 2B.) 
    Ans. 50 lb.
    [-21-]
    Ques. What amount could be kept if stored un a fireproof safe within such a dwelling-house or building?
    Ans. 100 lb.
    Ques. What would you do if you saw a boy aged eleven enter a shop and purchase two-pennyworth of fireworks?
    Ans. Take the boy's name and address and a description of fireworks, also name and address of person from whom he made the purchase. (38 and 39 Vic., C. 17, S. 31.)
    Ques. What would you do if yousaw a person casting or firing fireworks in a public thoroughfare?
    Ans. If known to me, I should report the offender for a summons ; otherwise I should apprehend and charge him. (38 and 39 Vic., C. 17. S. 80.)
    Ques. What is the state of the law as to the conveyance of explosives in passenger boats and carriages?
    Ans. Explosives shall not be carried in a passenger carriage or boat unless the quantity be under 5 lb., and all due precautions be taken for the prevention of accidents by fire or explosion.
    (Certain explosives are in no case to he carried by such carriage or boat.)
    Ques. What would you do if you were to meet a man on the public highway carrying a gun who, on being requested to produce a licence, declined, and also refused to give his name and address?
    Ans. I should take him into custody and charge him with the offence. (S. 9.)
    Ques. If you were to meet two men each carrying a part of a gun on the public highway, what would you do?
    Ans. Demand to see their licences. lf they could not produce them, I should take their names and addresses, and report them. (S. 8.)
    Ques. You are on duty in a public highway, and you see a man crossing an adjoining field carrying a gun - what steps would you take?
    Ans. I should enter the field and request him to produce his licence. Should he be unable to do so, I should take his name and address and report him; but I cannot enter a dwelling-house or the curtilage for this purpose. (S. 10.) 
    Ques. What is the duration of a gun-licence?
    Ans. Twelve months, expiring on July 31st.
    Ques. Only during what time may the Thames Police search for and seize explosives on board a vessel in the Thames or any part of it (docks, creeks, etc.)
    Ans. Between sunrise and sunset (2 and 3 Vict., C. 47).

[-22-]

FELONY, ETC.

   Ques. What is felony?
   Ans. It is the more serious offence, and includes murder and attempts to murder and maim ; manslaughter; rape robbery and attempts to rob; burglary; house-breaking; cattle, horse and sheep stealing; stealing from dwelling-house and theft generally ; receiving stolen goods; embezzlement, etc.; setting fire to any house or outbuilding, stacks or crops nearly all cases of forging and coining; assault when armed or with intent to rob.
   Ques. What is the difference in the offences committed viz., stealing apples growing in an orchard, and stealing apples out of a basket placed outside a shop?
   Ans. The first case is a misdemeanour, and if charged with stealing, it should be shown whether it was growing fruit. The second is "felony," and should be charged as in the case of articles, etc. ([1] 24 and 25 Vic., C. 96, S. 36; [2] C. 96, S. 1.)
   Ques. You are on duty near a railway embankment, and you see a man other than a railway servant remove the light from a semaphore - what would you do?
   Ans. I should stop him, take him to the officials at the railway station, and explain his conduct. If he was unknown to them, and they expressed a desire to charge him, as the trains were still running, I should take him into custody, one of the officials going to the station to sign the charge sheet. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 100, S. 32.)
   Ques. What is the offence, and how would he be charged? 
   Ans. The offence is "felony." Unlawfully and maliciously removing the light of a signal situated at ... on the ... Railway so as to endanger the safety of persons travelling, or being upon such railway at . . (time), . . (date), . . (parish).
   Ques. The owner of a steam-plough points out a man to you whom he states has broken off several of the valves, rendering the plough useless, and he wishes to give him into custody - what would you do?
   Ans. I should take him into custody and convey him to the police-station, the complainant going there to substantiate the charge and sign the charge-sheet. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 97 S. 15.)
   Ques. What is an accessory after the fact?
   Ans. One who, knowing a felony has been committed by another person, receives, relieves, comforts, or assists the [-23-] felon in order to hinder his being apprehended or tried, or suffering the punishment to which he is condemned. (24 and 25 Vic, C. 94.)
   Ques. What is an accessory before the fact?
   Ans. One who is absent at the time the felony is committed, but doth procure, counsel, command, or abet another to commit a felony which is committed in consequence of such counselling, procuring, or commandment. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 94.)
   Ques. How can an accessory before the fact be now tried and punished?
   Ans. As a principal. (Same Act.)
   Ques. Would a woman who sheltered her husband, he being an escaped felon, be an accessory after the fact?
   Ans. No. (Stephens Digest.)
   Ques. If a person inQues another to commit a felony, what could he be charged with?
   Ans. A misdemeanour.
   Ques. If the chimney of a house is on fire, is the occupier liable?
   Ans. Yes. (10 and 11 Vic., C. 89.)
   Ques. What must he prove so as not to be convicted?
   Ans. That the fire was in nowise owing to omission neglect, or carelessness of himself or servant.
   Ques. If it is proved that he wilfully set the chimney on fire, what offence is it?
   Ans. Felony. (10 and 11 Vic, C. 89.)
   Ques. What offence is it if a person unlawfully removes a buoy, so as to endanger a ship, vessel, or boat?
   Ans. Felony. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 97.)
   Ques. If a person induces a postman to intercept or deliver up a letter when in the course of transmission by the post, what would he be charged with?
   Ans. Felony. (R. v. James.)
   Ques. If a reasonable charge of felony is preferred against a person, is a constable bound to arrest?
   Ans. Yes ; even although upon investigation it turns out that no felony has been committed, the arrest and detention are justified. (Cowles v. Dunbar, 2. C. and P., 565.)
   Ques. In what cases would it be advisable for a constable to break into a house, although no felony has been committed and where it would be dangerous to delay in effecting the arrest ?
   Ans. (1) Persons fighting furiously in a house ; (2) [-24-] premises entered by persons with a felonious intent, and there are no other means of entering.
   Ques. When a prisoner is charged with felony, what must be carefully avoided, and what warning should be given him
   Ans. That no statement of an incriminating nature be extracted from him either by police or any other person. He should be warned that anything he says may be used in evidence against him.
   Ques. Before a person is charged, what should the officer in charge of the station carefully do?
   Ans. Ascertain that there are reasonable grounds for charging the person, and carefully consider and investigate the matter before accepting the charge.

HACKNEY AND STAGE CARRIAGES.

   Ques. What is the longest distance a cabman can be compelled to drive a fare
   Ans. Six miles, within Metropolitan Police District. (32 and 33 Vic., c. 115, S. 9.)
   Ques. Between what hours is a cab-driver not bound to hire his cab by time?
   Ans. Between the hours of 8 p.m. and 6 am. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, sch. A.)
   Ques. What rate is a H.C. driver supposed to drive at?
   Ans. Not less than six miles per hour. (16 and 17 Vic, C. 33, S. 17 [2].)
   Ques. What rate if hired by time?
   Ans. Not more than four miles an hour. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, S. 17.)
   Ques. Should the hirer require him to drive at a greater speed, and he covers more than four miles an hour, can he demand more fare?
   Aus. Yes ; he can charge for the distance over four miles. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, S. 17.)
   Ques. If hired by time, how long is he compelled to drive at least?
   Aus. One hour. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, S. 17)
   Ques. If two horses are attached to a H.C., is the hirer compelled to pay extra ? If so, what amount?
   Ans. Yes ; one-third more than ordinary fare for time and distance. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33, S. 17.)
   Ques. A fare contracts with a driver to drive him a certain distance for a stated amount, which exceeds the legal fare. [-25-] When the hirer discharges him he pays the legal fare. Can the driver demand the amount he agreed to drive him for?
   Ans. No ; the amount demanded over legal fare, if paid, can be recovered (1 and 2 Wm. IV., C. 22, S. 43.)
   Ques. If he plies for hire on a Sunday, is he subject to the same regulations as a weekday?
   Ans. Yes. (1 and 2 Wm. IV., C. 22, S. 37.)
   Ques. If a driver finds anything in his cab, within what time must he deposit it at a police station ? (The same regulations apply to M.S.C drivers and conductors.)
   Ans. Within twenty-four hours, if not sooner claimed. (16 and 17 Vic., c. 33, S. 11.)
   Ques. What is the limited time that a complaint can be made against a licensed person?
   Ans. Seven days.
   Ques. If you see a driver wearing a badge which has been circulated as lost, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Seize badge, take name and address of person wearing it, also the number of carriage and name and address of proprietor. (6 and 7 Vic., C. 86, S. 10.)
   Ques. You see a driver or conductor of a public carriage wearing a badge which has been granted to another person, and the wearer declines his name and address, what would you do?
   Ans. I should take him into custody and charge him with unlawfully wearing the badge. (16 and 17 Vic., c. 86, S. 10.)
   Ques. What is the least age a person must be before a M.S.C. or H.C. driver's licence can be granted to him within the Metropolis ? (32 and 33 Vic., C. 115, S. 8.)
   Ans. Stage driver twenty-one years of age; H.C. driver twenty-one years of age.
   Ques. A cab driver brings a cylinder to the station which has been left in his cab ; it apparently contains compressed gas - what would you do?
   Ans. I should exercise great care in handling it, and place it in a position where it would not roll about ; also place it in some open space and send for a smith or gas-fitter, who would allow the contents to escape; also submit a report of the expense incurred attached to the deposit sheet.
   Ques. If property found in public carriages is detained beyond the legal time, what is necessary for the depositor to do ? If a Sunday intervenes, is it to be calculated as a period of delay?
   [-26-]
   Ans. Make out a report in explanation of the delay, and it is to be submitted with the deposit sheet. No.
   Ques. What is necessary for you to do if a licensed driver or conductor is convicted of felony or unlawful possession?
   Ans. Draw the magistrate's attention to the fact that, if the licence be not revoked, he can claim it at the expiration of his punishment.
   Ques. Within what time must a driver or conductor hand in his licence and badge after the expiration of the licence?
   Ans. Within three days. (13 and 14 Vic., C. 7, S. 2.)
   Ques. If a bag or box which is locked, or a sealed parcel be deposited at a station, what is necessary before it should be given up to an applicant ? Should he raise an objection to such necessaries being carried out, what would you do?
   Ans. He should be requested to open the bag or parcel, so that the contents would be described on deposit sheet, and the usual award paid. He is to be referred to the Lost Property Office, where the property is to be sent by the next despatch with the deposit sheet, accompanied by a special report of the circumstances.
   Ques. If property of the apparent value of 5, which has been found in a public carriage, is deposited at a police station, what is necessary to do?
   Ans. Telegraph particulars immediately to Lost Property Office.
   Ques. What are the regulations for Metropolitan stage or hackney carriage proprietors to observe respecting advertisements on their vehicles?
   Ans. That no notice, advertisement, printed bill, or any names, letters or numbers may appear on the outside of such carriage, so as to obstruct light or ventilation or on the inside, so that such notice, advertisement or bill obstructs light or ventilation, or causes annoyance to passengers. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 33.)
   Ques. If a passenger should find property belonging to another person on a M.S.C., to whom should he hand it?
   Ans. To the conductor; or, if there is no conductor, to the driver. Should the finder refuse, he or she is liable to a penalty of 10.
   Ques. If a private person finds a mislaid or lost badge, within what time must he deliver it up at a police station?
   [-27-] Ans. Within three days ; is. is paid to the person. Penalty for not handing it in is 40s.
   Ques. What are the colours of badges of licensed drivers and conductors?
   Ans. M. S.C. driver, white letters on chocolate ground; M.S.C. conductor, black letters on yellow ground; HG. driver, black letters on white ground; motor cab driver, white letters on green ground (same as shoeblacks) ; M.S.C. motor driver, white on blue ground (same as street messengers).
   Ques. At what place in London is a hackney carriage driver not allowed to ply for hire, nor any hawker, news-vendor, or idle or disorderly person allowed to stop or loiter on the pavement outside the building?
   Ans. Opposite the G P.O., St. Martin's-le-Grand. Penalty 5. (1 Vic., C. 36.)
   Ques. What is the least age a person must be before a stage driver's licence can be granted him outside London?
   Ans. Sixteen years of age. (6 and 7 Vic., C. 86, S. 8.)
   Ques. If a cab is standing on the premises of a railway company by their leave, can the driver be compelled to convey any person desirous of hiring it?
   Ans. No. (Case v. Storey.)
   Ques. If a licensed carriage is withdrawn for two consecutive days, what power has the Commissioner of Police?
   Ans. He may suspend or recall the licence. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 127, S. 16.)
   Ques. If a proprietor wishes to withdraw the carriage, how many days' notice must he give?
   Ans. Ten days. (16 and 17 Vic., C. 127, S. 16.)
   Ques. Should a proprietor change his address, within what time must he produce his licence at C.O. for the purpose of having it endorsed with new address?
   Ans. Seven days.
   Ques. If a driver or conductor change his address, what is necessary for him to do ?
   Ans. Give notice in writing to the Commissioner within two days, stating new address ; also must produce his licence at C.O. to be thus endorsed. (6 and 7 Vic., C. 86, s.15)
   Ques. What is the least amount of money a cabman is allowed to take for a fare?
   Ans. 1s. (30 and 31 Vic., C. 134, 5. 26.)
   Ques. If you take the driver of a hackney carriage into custody during the time he is acting as driver, what other steps are necessary?
   [-28-] Ans. Have carriage taken to station, telegram sent to the station nearest the residence of proprietor requesting him to send a driver for the carriage. (6 and 7 Vic., C. 86, S. 27)
   Ques. If you saw a person unlawfully acting as a conductor of a M.S.C. without a licence, what would you do?
   Ans. Take the number of M.S.C. and apply for summons against proprietor for employing an unlicensed person, and against the conductor for acting without a licence.
   Ques. Under what circumstances may a hackney carriage driver's licence be granted to a person under twenty-one years of age?
   Ans. In a case where he is recommended by a proprietor to the Commissioner on "special grounds.'
   Ques. If the driver or conductor of a M.S.C. or H.C. report the loss of his badge or licence at the station, what steps should be taken?
   Ans. Not to "circulate" it, but send direct to Public Carriage Branch, to be there dealt with.
   Ques. If a P.C. saw a case of cruelty (not gross) to a horse drawing a public carriage (M.S.C. or H.C.), what should he do?
   Ans. Take name and address or number of proprietor and driver and report it. Not to seize the horse or take the driver into custody.
   Ques. If it is a serious ease of cruelty or torture, what should be done ?
   Ans. The animal should be taken without delay before a magistrate, have driver charged, and information sent to Public Carriage Branch together with a description of the horse.
   Ques. If a driver of M.S.C. or H.C. drives on wrong side of a street, refuge, or rest, what offence must the P.C. prove ?
   Ans. Misbehaviour, wanton driving, or driving to the common danger.
   Ques. You see a man, whom you know to be employed as a clerk, driving a hansom cab, in which is a fare, in public street. What steps would you take?
   Ans. Seize the badge, if any, take man and cab to station, and inform Commissioner or Public Carriage Department to find whose badge he is wearing, also inform proprietor of cab. Take proceedings against the prisoner for driving hansom cab without a licence, and if the proper driver has lent him his badge, summon him also.
   DUTIES OF POLICE AT A CAB RANK (METROPOLITAN).
   Examine each H.C. and horse on the standing and report either unfit, or harness defective or unsound. Not to allow over the number on the stand. Report all eases of drunkenness, misconduct, etc., of drivers, and to pay special attention to furious and wanton driving. Report any cab without approval mark, or damaged or improperly fixed plate. If standing is in a busy place, see that no driver leaves his cab. Not to allow the drivers to stand together on pavement, or to cause any obstruction or annoyance. See that all tables of distances, tables, etc., are all right. Patrol to a distance of 150 yards, but keep the stands in sight. Not to gossip with drivers. See that the water from water-posts is not used for private use, but for public carriage purposes only.

HAWKERS AND PEDLARS.

   Ques. What is meant by a hawker?
   Ans. Any person who travels with a horse or other beast bearing or drawing the burden, and goes from place to place, or to other men's houses, carrying to sell, or exposing for sale, any goods, wares or merchandise, or exposing samples or patterns of any goods, wares or merchandise to be afterwards delivered. (51 and 52 Vic., C. 33, S. 2.)
   Ques. What does the term "hawker" include?
   Ans. It includes any person who travels by any means of locomotion to any place in which he does not usually reside or carry on business, and there sells or exposes for sale any goods, wares or merchandise, in or at any house, shop, room, booth, stall or other place whatever, hired or used by him for that purpose. (S. 2.)
   Ques. From whom are hawkers' Iicences obtained?
   Ans. Any officer of Inland Revenue, and the cost is 2. (S. 3, S.-S. 1.)
   Ques. What is the difference between a "pedlar" and a "hawker"?
   Ans. A pedlar is a person licensed by the Police Authorities, and who travels on foot selling goods from house to house. A hawker is licensed by the Excise Authorities, and uses a horse or other beast of burden to draw his goods.
   Ques. You see a "licensed hawker" hawking paraffin, and you are doubtful whether he is authorised to hawk same - what would you do?
   Ans. I should ask to see the licence authorising him to [-30-] hawk same, which is granted by local authority ; if he is unable to produce one, I should report him with a view to his being summoned.
   Ques. When do all hawkers' licences expire?
   Ans. On March 31st following the date on which they were granted. (S. 3, S-S. 2.)
   Ques. To whom is a hawker bound to produce his licence?
   Ans. To any person who demands its production. (S. 6, S.-S. 1B)
   Ques. Where is every hawker required to have his name and the words "licensed hawker" printed or written?
   Ans. Upon every box or package and every vehicle used for the carriage of his goods, and upon every room or shop in which his goods are sold, and upon every handbill or advertisement which he distributes or publishes. (S. 5, S.-S.1)
   Ques. May a hawker lend his licence to any person, or may a servant trade with such licence for his master's benefit?
   Ans. He must not lend or hire his licence. Yes, a servant may trade for his master's benefit. (S. 5, S-S. 2.)
   Ques. Name four classes of persons who do not require to take out hawkers' licences.
   Ans. (1) Any person selling or seeking orders for goods, wares or merchandise to or from persons who are dealers therein, and who buy to sell again. (2) The real worker or maker of any goods, wares or merchandise, and his children, apprentices and servants usually residing in the same house with him, selling or seeking orders for goods, wares or merchandise made by such real worker or maker. (3) Any person selling fish, fruit, victuals or coal. (4) Any person selling or exposing for sale goods, wares or merchandise in any public mart, market or fair legally established. (S. 3.)
   Ques. What are your powers of arrest under this Act?
   Ans. I have power to arrest any person whom I find acting as a hawker without having a proper licence, or who fails to produce a proper licence upon the demand of anybody. (S. 6, S-S. 3.)
   Ques. Before a person can act as a pedlar, what must he obtain?
   Ans. A certificate from the police of the district in which he resides, for which he pays 5s. (34 and 35 Vic., C. 96, S.5)
   Ques. Upon what conditions is a pedlar's certificate granted?
   Ans. (1) Applicant must have resided one month in his [-31-] police district ; (2) must be above seventeen years of age ; (3) must be of good character; (4) in good faith intends to carry on the trade of a pedlar. (S. 5, S-S. 1.)
   Ques. If the certificate was issued in London, may a pedlar carry on his trade anywhere outside this town?
   Ans. Yes, anywhere within the United Kingdom. 
   Ques. What persons are disqualified from becoming pedlars?
   Ans. Any person convicted of felony, begging, or of any misdemeanour involving dishonesty.
   Ques. How long does a pedlar's certificate remain in force?
   Ans. One year from date of issue.
   Ques. Who may arrest a pedlar?
   Ans. Any person, as in question below, or any other person acting by their orders.
   Ques. Who can demand to see a pedlar's licence?
   Ans. (1) Any Justice ; (2) any P.C. or police officer; (3) any person to whom such pedlar offers his goods for sale; (4) any person in whose private grounds or premises such pedlar is found. (34 and 35 Vic., C. 96, S. 17.)
   Ques. What are the exceptions under which petroleum can be kept for private use or for sale without a licence?
   Ans. (1) That it is kept in separate glass, earthenware or metal vessels, each of which contains not more than a pint and is securely stopped; (2) that the total amount kept, supposing the whole contents of the vessels to be in bulk, does not exceed three gallons.
   Ques. From whom can a licence to keep and sell petroleum be obtained?
   Ans. The Local Authority. (Petroleum Act, 1871.)
   Ques. If a shopkeeper has a licence to hawk petroleum, could he send one of his servants to hawk it instead, without first obtaining a licence for him?
   Ans. Yes. (44 and 45 Vic., C. 67.)
   Ques. What is the greatest quantity of petroleum a hawker is allowed to convey at one time in any one carriage?
   Ans. Twenty gallons. (Same Act.)
   Ques. What is the meaning of "carriage" in the above?
   Ans. Any carriage, waggon, cart, truck, vehicle or other means of conveyance by land, in whatever manner the same may be drawn or propelled. (Same Act.)
   Ques. If hawkers of fish throw the filth or refuse in the streets, what should you do?
   Ans. Report them for a summons. (2 and 3 Vic., C. 47, S 60.)
   Ques. If a person was found hawking or carrying about [-32-] playing cards for sale in stamped wrappers, would he be liable?
   Ans. Yes; he may be apprehended by a constable. Penalty 20. (25 and 26 Vic., C. 22.)

INFANT LIFE PROTECTION ACT (60 and 61 Vic.).

   Ques. Under this Act, what age must an infant exceed to be hired away from its parents?
   Ans. Five years.
   Ques. Before the expiration of what time must notice of the hiring he given to the Local Authority, and by whom?
   Ans. Forty-eight bouts. The person receiving it.
   Ques. Before the Local Authority can interfere, what must be clearly known?
   Ans. That the child is received for a reward, for the purpose of being nursed or maintained apart from its parents.
   Ques. What other information must the person receiving it give the Local Authority?
   Ans. The correct name, age and sex of the child and address where it can be found. Also informant's name and address.
   Ques. If the child is passed on to a second person, what must then be done?
   Ans. Correct name and address of second person must be given by the first persons.
   Ques. What have the Local Authority power to do under this Act?
   Ans. Appoint Male or Female inspectors to enforce the Act, by inquiries, etc.
   Ques. What power has an inspector under this Act, in addition to making inquiries etc.
   Ans. Inspect the infants and premises where they are being kept
   Ques. What is the object of this inspection?
   Ans. To satisfy himself or herself that the infant is properly maintained or to give any necessary advice or directions as to such maintenance.
   Ques. If a person refuses admittance to an inspector, what should he do?
   Ans. Apply to a magistrate or two J.P.s for a warrant to enter the premises.
   Ques. Who fixes the number of infants a person may receive?
   [-33-] Ans. The Local Authority.
   Ques. Under what other age may a person receive a child and on what condition?
   Ans. Two years. That not more than 20 is paid down for its maintenance. Notice must he given to Local Authority within forty-eight hours.
   Ques. If an inspector after inspection finds that the child is not being properly looked after, what can he do?
   Ans. Apply to Local Authority for an order in writing to remove the child to the workhouse or other place of safety, till parents or relatives can receive it, or be otherwise lawfully disposed of.
   Ques. If a person refuses to allow the child to be removed hy the inspector after the "order" has been shown to her, what should the inspector do?
   Ans. Apply to a J.P. for an order to remove the child, and such order may be enforced by a police constable.
   Ques. If a child dies in the house of a person who is maintaining it (as above), without having had medical treatment, what must she do?
   Ans. Inform the coroner before the expiration of twenty-four hours.

LICENSING ACT, 1902.

   Ques. If you see a person drunk and incapable in a public place, what should you do?
   Ans. Apprehend him.
   Ques. What is a "public place"?
   Ans. Any place to which the public have access, whether on payment or otherwise, such as a public omnibus in use, a railway carriage in use, a packet boat in use, a public concert-room, a theatre, an agricultural show, etc. (Paterson's Licensing Acts)
   Ques. Before you can arrest a drunken person who has a young child with him or her, what should you be sure of?
   Acts. (1) That the person is drunk ; (2) that the child is apparently under the age of seven years.
   Ques. Where can you arrest such a person?
   Ans. In any highway or other public place (see above), whether a building or not, or on any licensed premises.
   Ques. Why has the age of seven been fixed upon.
   Ans. Because it is the recognised limit of absolute legal incapacity.
   [-34-] 
   Ques. If a licensed person is charged with permitting drunkenness on his premises what has he to prove?
   Ans. That he and the persons employed by him took all reasonable steps for preventing drunkenness on the premises.
   Ques. What is an habitual drunkard?
   Ans. A person who, not being amenable to any jurisdiction in lunacy, is, notwithstanding, by reason of habitual intemperate drinking of intoxicating liquor, at times dangerous to himself or herself or to others, or incapable of managing himself or herself and his or her affairs. (42 & 43 Vict. C. 19, S. 3.)
   Ques. If you see a person who is on the "black list" go into a public house or registered club to obtain drink, what should you do?
   Ans. Warn the publican not to serve him with intoxicating drink.
   Ques. May a publican serve a person who is on the "Black List" with non-intoxicating liquors?
   Ans. Yes; no offence if the man is sober.
   Ques. Is an army canteen bound to have an excise licence?
    Ans. No; it is governed by War Office and officer commanding. (Licensing Act, 1902.)
   Ques. Under what conditions can an "occasional licence" be granted?
   Ans. If consent of a Petty Sessional Court is given, and after twenty-four hours notice of the intention to apply for same has been given to the Police. (Licensing Act, 1902).
   Ques. What interval of time must elapse between the nomination and admission of a person to a registered club?
   Ans. Forty-eight hours.
   Ques. If you saw a man go into a public-house, procure intoxicating liquor, and bring it out into the roadway to a person who you know is on the "black list," and who drinks it, the landlord being ignorant of the transaction, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Take names and addresses of both men and report for summons.

LOCOMOTIVES, ETC.

   Ques. What is the greatest width and weight of a locomotive allowed to pass on a highway?
   Ans. Width nine feet; weight, not to exceed fourteen tons.
   Ques. What is the limited rate at which they may be driven through London or any town, also in the country?
   Ans. Town, two miles an hour; country, four miles an hour.
   [35-]
   Ques. How many lights must be affixed to a locomotive after dark, and during what hours?
   Ans. One at each side on the front, and an efficient red light on the rear. Between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise for six months from April 1st, and between sunset and sunrise during the six months beginning 1st October.
   Ques. How many persons must accompany each locomotive, and what are their duties?
   Ans. Three persons two to drive and attend to locomotive, and, if not a steam roller, another person to accompany it in such a manner as to he able to give assistance to any person with horses or carriages drawn by horses meeting or overtaking the locomotive, and to give such assistance when required. If locomotive is drawing more than three waggons another person shall be employed to attend to the waggons.
   Ques. Must locomotives consume their own smoke?
   Ans. Yes ; they must be constructed on the principle of consuming their own smoke. Onus of proof of this lies on the defendant. (Pitt-Rivers v. Glasse.)
   Ques. How many locomotives are allowed on a bridge at the same time?
   Ans. One; distance between that and the one ahead must be not less than 200 yards.
   Ques. What bridges in London must locomotives not be driven over?
   Ans. Lambeth, Chelsea, Albert and Wandsworth.
   Ques. What must be conspicuously affixed to every locomotive?
   Ans. Name and residence of owner.

LIGHT LOCOMOTIVES.

    Ques. What is a "light locomotive"?
   An;. A vehicle propelled by mechanical power, under three tons in weight (unladen), and is not used for the purpose of drawing more than one vehicle (locomotive and vehicle, unladen, must not exceed four tons in weight), and so constructed that no smoke or visible vapour is emitted, except through accident or of a temporary nature.
   Ques. What is not included in estimating the weight of a locomotive (see Ques.1)?
   Ans. Any water, fuel, or accumulators used for the purpose of propulsion.
   Ques. What must the width of a light locomotive not exceed?
   [-36-]
Ans. Six and a half feet.
   Ques. If a light locomotive exceeds 5 cwt. in weight, unladen, what important regulation must it conform to?
   Ans. That it shall be capable of being so worked that it may travel either forwards or backwards.
   Ques. How many brakes must a light locomotive have, and how are they to act?
   Ans. Two. That if either of the brakes be applied it shall cause two of the wheels on the same axle to stop revolving. (In a bicycle, one wheel must stop revolving.)
   Ques. If a light locomotive is used for drawing another vehicle, or constructed to carry goods, or should weigh (unladen) one and a half tons at least, what regulations must be observed?
   Ans. Name and address of owner, also the weight painted in one or more straight lines upon some conspicuous part on the off side in large legible letters, not less than one inch in height, in white upon black, or black upon white colours.
   Ques. Beyond what rate of speed must a light locomotive not be driven?
   Ans. Twelve miles an hour. Between one and a half and two tons not to exceed eight miles an hour, above two tons not to exceed five miles an hour.
   Ques. If drawing another vehicle, what rate must it not exceed?
   Ans. Six miles an hour.
   Ques. If the name and address, etc., of owner is not legibly painted on the light locomotive, to whom is he hound to give it?
   Ans. To any constable, or on the reasonable request of any other person.

LUNATICS, ETC.

   Ques. If you found a lunatic, would you ascertain first whether the master of workhouse had accommodation?
   Ans. No; convey him to the workhouse, together with the special forms necessary.
   Ques. If the master (see above) declined to admit him, what would you do?
   Ans. Take him back to station and provide for him in the best possible manner, until he could be taken before a magistrate or J.P , and submit a full report of circumstances.
   Ques. If you were called to a private house to take a person into custody who is insane and under the control of friends, what would you do?
   [-37-] Ans. Refer them to parochial authorities or to a magistrate.
   Ques. If in the above question you were asked to assist in restraining him, would you do so?
   Ans. Yes, till parochial authorities or magistrate had been communicated with.
   Ques. If you find an insane person, and cannot ascertain his name and address, what would you do to have him identified?
   Ans. Take a full description of him for circulation in "Informations."
   Ques. Before the expiration of what time must a lunatic be taken before a J.P.?
   Ans. Three days.
   Ques. If a person is apparently of unsound mind, and acting violently to those around him, what should be done?
   Ans. Assist to restrain him, take charge of him, and send to station for the officer on duty to attend with necessary Forms as quickly as possible. (Metropolitan.)
   Ques If there is a doubt as to the person's sanity, what should be done then?
   Ans. Send for the Relieving Officer to remove the person to the workhouse ; should he not come within a reasonable time, remove him there myself and report full particulars for Commissioner.
   Ques. If a person is suffering from delirium tremens, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Act as if the person was insane.
   Ques. Who decides at the station whether a person is insane or not?
   Ans. The officer in charge of the station. The Divisional Surgeon is called if the person is suffering from any injury.

MARINE STORE DEALERS, ETC.

   Ques. What constitutes a "Dealer in old metals"?
   Ans. Any person dealing in, buying or selling old metals, scrap metals, broken metal, or partly manufactured goods, or defaced old metal goods, whether such person deals in such articles only, or together with second-hand goods or marine stores.
   Ques. What is the least quantity of lead or composite of lead that he may purchase at a time?
   An;. Lead or composite of lead, 112 lb.
   Ques. What is the least quantity of copper, brass or pewter?
   [-38-] Ans. Copper, brass or pewter, 56 lb.
   Ques. During what time is a dealer in old metals prohibited from purchasing or receiving any old metals of any description?
   Ans. Between 6 p.m. and 9 am. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 110, S. 8, S-S. 2.)
   Ques. What is the time required that a dealer in old metal should retain articles which he purchases before disposing or altering them?
   Ans. Forty-eight hours (S.-S. 15.)
   Ques. Would it be lawful for a dealer in old metals to purchase articles of a boy under sixteen years of age?
   Ans. No. (S.-S. 2.)
   Ques. If a dealer in old metals is convicted of receiving stolen property, what may a magistrate order him to do?
   Ans. To be registered at the police station in the district in accordance with Schedule 1 for a stated period not to exceed three years. (S. 5.)
   Ques. What length of cable or similar article may be cut up without permission?
   Ans. Not to exceed five fathoms. (S-S. 3.)
   Ques. From whom would he receive such permission as aforesaid, and on what conditions?
   Ans. From a Justice having jurisdiction over the place. On condition that he satisfied the said Justice that it came lawfully into his possession, before whom he would have to produce a declaration in accordance with S-S. 1, 2 and 3. (S. 481.)
   Ques. After obtaining such permission, would he then be at liberty to cut it up?
   Ans. Not until he had advertised his intention in a newspaper published nearest to the place where he resides, notifying the fact of his having so obtained a permit, specifying the nature of the cable or other article mentioned in the permit.
   Ques. Under what age is he prohibited from buying of a child? Also, at what age may he employ an apprentice?
   Ans. In each case the age is sixteen years. (S. 8, S-S. 2.)
   Ques. What is he bound to have distinctly over the door of his warehouse?
   Ans. His name, together with the words "Dealer in Marine Stores," distinctly painted in letters of not less than six inches in length. (17 and 18 Vic., C. 104, S. 480, S.-S. 1.)
   Ques. What is he bound to do on purchasing marine stores?
   [-39-] Ans. Keep a book fairly written with an account of all marine stores which come into his possession, giving the time of purchase, accompanied by the name and address and occupation of the seller. (S-S. 2.)
   Ques. What is the least length of cable that a marine store dealer is allowed to buy?
   Ans. Five fathoms.
   Marks appropriated for use in or on His Majesty's Stores, and by which a P.C. could identify them.

STORES MARKS
Hempen cordage and wire rope  White, black or coloured worsted threads laid up with the yarns and the wire respectively.
Canvas, fear-nought, hammocks, and sea-men's bags A blue line in a serpentine form. 
Bunting A double tape in the warp
Candles Blue or red cotton threads in each wick or wicks of red cotton
Timber or metal, any stores not above enumerated, whether similar to the above or not The name of His Majesty, his predecessors, his heirs or successors, or of any public department, or any branch thereof, or the broad arrow, or a crown, or His Majesty's arms, whether such broad arrow, crown or arms be alone, or be in combination with any such name as aforesaid, or with any letters denoting any such name.


NUISANCES, ETC., AND COSTERMONGERS.

       Various nuisances for which persons may be summoned or arrested "on view":-
    Nuisances and annoyances from beating carpets; driving carriages for breaking, exercising or trying horses riding any horse for exercising, showing or exposing for sale (otherwise than by passing through such streets or other public places) ; throwing, etc., or permitting to be thrown. etc , any ashes, dirt, rubbish, offal, dung, soil, blood or other filth, matter or thing on carriage or footway of any such street or public place ; killing, scalding, dressing or cutting up any [-40-] beast, swine, calf; sheep, lamb or other cattle in or near any such street or public place, so that any blood or filth runs upon, or over, or on either of such pavements ; running, rolling, driving, drawing, or placing or permitting thereon any waggon, cart, dray, sledge or other carriage, or any wheel, wheelbarrow, landbarrow or truck, or any hogshead, cart or barrel, or wilfully riding, leading or driving any horse, ass, mule or other beast thereon. Upon complaint on oath Justice may issue summons ; or any person seeing any offence committed may seize, and any person may assist in seizing, any offender and convey before a Justice ; and on the party appearing by summons, or not appearing after being summoned, Justice shall hear witnesses. Penalty, not less than 40s , nor more than 5 - one half to informer or person apprehending, one half to persons having control over pavements in place where offence is committed. (Michael Angelo Taylor's Act, 1817, S. 64)
   Ques. Where can swine be kept in London?
   Ans. Not within forty yards of any public street. (S. 68)
   Ques. If the Vestry officials of a parish neglect to act in the removal of a nuisance, and complaints are made to the Local Government Board, who can they direct to proceed?
   Ans. The chief officer of police ; but he must not enter premises where nuisance is without consent, or without warrant of a J.P. (29 and 30 Vic., C. 90, S. 16.)
   Ques. If a nuisance exists in a neighbourhood, and the Medical Officer of Health's certificate cannot be obtained, what is equivalent to it?
   Ans. The requisition in writing signed by ten inhabitants of the place where nuisance exists. (29 and 30 Vic,  C. 90.)
   Ques. If a person has died of an infectious disease in a private house, what is the greatest length of time the body is allowed to remain unburied, if not sent to a mortuary?
   Ans. Forty-eight hours. (Infectious Diseases Prevention Act, 1890.)
   Ques. To constitute a nuisance must actual injury have happened?
   Ans. No; it is sufficient if the thing complained of be likely to produce it. It has been held in a number of cases that no length of time will legalise a public nuisance. (Archibald.)
       The following are nuisances endangering the health, life or property of any of the public, viz., by carrying on unwholesome or offensive trades or occupations by which the [-41-] comfortable enjoyment of life and property is made impossible to a number of persons (R. v. White) ; exposing in the public street a child infected with small-pox (R. v. Vantandillo) ; bringing a glandered horse into a public place to the danger of infecting persons (R. v. Henson) ; keeping a pigeon-shooting ground (R. v. Pedley); erecting gunpowder mills or keeping gunpowder magazines near a town ; the making and selling of fireworks in unlicensed places ; making great noises in the night (R. v. Smith) ; keeping an offensive and disgusting exhibition (R. v. Grey) ; keeping a ferocious animal without proper control ; collecting crowds by exhibiting objects in a shop-window so as to create an obstruction in a highway (R. v. Lewis).
   Ques. If awnings or window blinds are so fixed as to cause annoyance to pedestrians, what should you do?
   Ans. Call attention of proprietor, if nuisance continues, submit a report and ask for instructions. As a rule, the local authority will have to deal with the matter under the Metropolis Local Management Act. (18 and 19 Vic., C. 120, S. 119.)
   Ques. If you saw any meat, fish, fruit, vegetables sold or offered for sale which was unfit for human food, what would you do?
   Ans. Take names and addresses and all necessary particulars ; report same, and acquaint sanitary authorities without delay ; also prevent any more being sold till the latter's arrival.
   Ques. If a man wanted to give a butcher into custody for selling bad meat, what would you do?
   Ans. Exchange names and addresses, inform Medical Officer of Health or the sanitary authorities, and report particulars.
   Ques. If a householder complained of being annoyed by street preachers, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Furnish him with preacher's name and address, refer him to the magistrate, and report the matter. If obstruction was caused, request preacher to desist ; if he declined, then take him into custody.
   Ques. If a householder complained of annoyance caused by street musicians, what steps would you take?
   Ans. If the musicians had refused to desist after being requested to do so by complainant, and the latter gave them into custody, convey them to station for complainant to charge them. Should he, after giving them into custody, [-42-] refuse to attend station to charge them, take their names and addresses, hand them to complainant, and release the men. Report the case without delay.
   Ques. What measurements must not costermonger's barrows, carts or stalls each exceed?
   Ans. Nine feet long and three feet wide, and no part of which shall project beyond the wheels.
   Ques. What should you do before reporting a costermonger for a summons for causing an obstruction with his barrow?
   Ans. Explain the regulations to him and caution him.
   Ques. What space must be kept between costers' stalls?
   Ans. Four feet.
   Ques. If you observe any meat, fish, fruit or vegetables apparently unfit for consumption sold or offered for sale in the streets by any person, what action should you take?
   Ans. Names and other particulars are to be obtained and sanitary authority acquainted, also restrain person from selling any more of it.
   Ques. What regulations would you observe if you were posted in a market-place (this specially related to stalls, etc.)?
   Ans. See that no stall exceeds 9 feet by 3 feet, and no part of the width projects beyond the wheels. No two stalls to be side by side, and 4 feet kept between the stalls for pedestrians.

PAWNBROKERS ETC.

   Ques. What age apparently must a person be before a pawnbroker may receive a pledge from him?
   Ans. Twelve. (35 and 36 Vic., C. 93.)
   Ques. What age at least must the pawnbroker's assistants be before they are allowed to receive pledges?
   Ans. Sixteen. (35 and 36 Vic., C. 93.)
   Ques. If a person who has lost a gold chain, and after discovering that it has been pawned at a certain pawnbroker's, requests your assistance to recover it, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Refer the person to a magistrate. I have no power to interfere, nor to accompany the owner to pawnbroker to get property restored.
   Ques. Above what age must a person be before a pawnbroker is allowed to take an article from him in pawn?
   Ans. Sixteen years. In the Metropolis. (2 and 3 Vic., C. 47, S. 50.)
   Ques. On what days is a pawnbroker prohibited from taking articles in pawn?
   [-43-] Ans. Sunday, Good Friday, Christmas Day, or a day appointed for public fast or humiliation.
   Ques. If a man who has previously lost his watch, and has just seen it in a pawnbrokers window, comes and asks you to assist him in recovering it, having asked the pawnbroker for it, but the latter declines to give it to him, what would you do?
   Ans. Refer him to the magistrate, as I have no power to assist him.

POLICE, ETC.

   Ques. What are the duties of a Sergeant when he parades his Relief?
   Ans. Form up the P.C.s into ranks for inspection by the Inspector or officer in charge see each man is sober, clean, and accoutrements correct ; report anyone absent and ascertain the cause ; post the men to their beats ; and read the orders, etc., aloud to them, if the officer in charge does not do it.
   Ques. If Police enter a house to execute a warrant, what are they bound to do?
   Ans. Produce it, if requested by the owner of the house to do so.
   Ques. What is it undesirable for detectives to do?
   Ans. To let their official character be known to strangers, by walking with police in uniform, by walking in step with each other in a drilled style, by wearing striking clothing, or police regulation boots, by openly recognising constables in uniform, or saluting superior officers.
   Ques. May a P.C. (Metropolitan) stop and search a boat on the river which he suspects has Government stores aboard unlawfully obtained.
   Ans. Yes, and may detain the same. (Police Stores Act, 1879.)
   Ques. If any Royalty are passing a certain point, what are police to carefully attend to?
   Ans. To the bystanders, not to the carriage.
   Ques. What is the difference between the authority of a police officer and a park keeper in a royal park or garden?
   Ans. The latter can arrest inside the park, but the former can arrest both inside and outside the park or garden.
   Ques. During what time are cattle prohibited from being driven through the "general limits" of the Metropolis?
   Ans. Between so 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., except with permission of the Commissioner. (48 and 49 Vic., c. 18.)
   [-44-]
   Ques. If you noticed a thoroughfare on your beat was very slippery and dangerous to traffic owing to want of cleanliness, what should you do?
   Ans. Send information to Borough Council, Vestry, or other local authority, and enter full particulars in occurrence book.
   Ques. What instructions would you give a young constable when posting him to a beat?
   Ans. The proper way to work his beat, both for night and. day duty, instruct him as to the position of fire-alarms, stations and turncocks, and his duty in general regarding an outbreak of fire the nearest hospitals, mortuaries etc , and his duty regarding accidents and disturbances ; to keep observation on loiterers, especially at night ; to be civil and polite to persons asking him questions ; not to loiter or gossip with anyone, or take drink, etc. If on night duty, show him how to mark ladders, low walls, empty houses, etc., also in early morning to keep observation on people carrying parcels, bags, etc.
   Ques. What are the "special limits" (Metropolis)?
   Ans. Certain streets and portions of streets within the "general limits " declared by the Commissioner of Police, and approved by the Secretary of State.
   Ques. What are the "general limits"?
   Ans. Such parts of the Metropolis as are enclosed in a circle, of which the centre is Charing Cross, and the radii are six miles in length, measured in a straight line from that centre.
   Que s. Within the special limits, during what time is the loading or unloading of coal prohibited on or across any footway?
   Ans. 10 am. and 6 pm. (30 and 31 Vic,  C.134.)
   Ques. Is a policeman entitled to search a cart merely because he suspects that a number of men in the cart, accompanied by dogs, may have been out poaching?
   Ans. No, unless he has good cause for such suspicion. (R. v. Spencer.)
   Ques. What are the primary objects of a police force?
   Ans. The prevention of crime, detection and punishment of offenders if a crime is committed, also the protection of life and property, and preservation of public tranquillity.
   Ques. What is discipline?
   Ans. Strict obedience and respect for lawful authority. The training one's self in habits of order and method, both personally and in duty.
   Ques. When should a police officer take a dying statement?
   [-45-] Ans. Only in a very urgent ease, where the person may die before a magistrate can be procured.
   Ques. On any occasion on which the police are employed in the public service, are they entitled to be conveyed by rail at a reduced rate?
   Ans. Yes. (46 and 47 Vic.,  C. 34, s. 6.)
   Ques. Are the Metropolitan police magistrates J.P.s as well?
   Ans. Yes ; J.P.s for the counties of Middlesex, Surrey, Kent, Essex and Herts, the city and liberty of Westminster, and the liberty of the Tower of London. (2 and 3 Vic.,C. 71, S.1). The chief magistrate is also a J. P. for Berks. (11 and 12 Vic., C. 42.)
   Ques. While acting as sergeant you find a P.C. absent from his beat, what would you do?
   Ans. Immediately take steps to cover his beat, ascertain cause of absence, and report to inspector on duty.
   Ques. While visiting your section a P.C. informs you that he has discovered an adhesive substance in the aperture of a letter box, and has been keeping observation ever since - what action would you take?
   Ans. Send information at once to officer on duty at station, who should without delay send an officer in plain clothes to keep observation until the arrival of the postman to clear the box, and inform him of the occurrence.
   Ques. If a person finds in the street a purse or pocket book containing money or valuables, and hands it to you, what should you do? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. If money, count it, and if valuables enumerate them, in the presence of the finder and enter details in my pocket book. Also take name and address of the finder so that the officer on duty at the station may send him the usual Form.

PUBLIC-HOUSES.

   Ques. If a person only holds a music and dancing licence, may he sell intoxicating liquors on his licensed premises?
   Ans. No.
   Ques. What are premises licensed by the County Council for music, dancing, etc., bound to have fixed on them?
   Ans. A notice, on the door or entrance, in capital letters to that effect.
   Ques. May a swimming bath be used for music and dancing entertainments ; if so, on what conditions?
   Ans. Yes. That a licence for that purpose is obtained previously, that the place must not be habitually used for that [-46-] purpose, and that no money be taken at the doors. (62 and 63 Vic., C. 29.)
   Ques. You receive information that a wooden hut has been erected for the convenience of workmen on a new railroad which is being constructed, and that intoxicating liquor and tobacco is being sold therein without a licence having been obtained. What steps would you take?
   Ans. At once submit a report to the Commissioner for information of Inland Revenue Authorities.
   Ques. A publican is convicted, and appeals against the decision of the magistrate. If you were in charge of the case, what would you do?
   Ans. Serve him with a written notice to produce his licence on the hearing of the appeal, and submit a report (with copy of notice attached) that this has been done for information of Commissioner. Also submit another report of having been informed by the Magistrate's Clerk that he would forward to Commissioner's Solicitors the necessary particulars for them to defend the "appeal."
   Ques. When the public-houses are closed, may intoxicating liquors be sold on board a vessel moored or at anchor in the Thames?
   Ans. No.
   Ques. To what extent may brandy, whisky or rum be legally diluted with water? and what condition must be complied with?
   Ans. 25 degrees ; gin 35 degrees. Notice must be given to the purchaser by a printed or other notice that the spirit is so diluted.  (43 and 44 Vic., C. 20.)
   Ques. If a man entered an inn accompanied by a fierce dog, which frightened or annoyed the other customers, would the landlord be justified in refusing to serve him?
   Ans. Yes. (R. v. Rymer, Q. B. D., 136.)
   Ques. If the landlord of a public-house was found drunk on the premises after closing hours, could he be charged with being found drunk on licensed premises ?
   Ans. No ; after closing hours a public house is a private house. (Lester v. Torrens, 41 J.P., 821.)
   Ques. Is the landlord of a public-house in which he has a licensed billiard table allowed to play thereon during prohibited hours?
   Ans. No;  playing at billiards is absolutely prohibited after the hour of closing the house for selling liquors has arrived. (Ovenden v. Raymond, 40 J.P., 727.)
   [-47-] 
   Ques. May a beer-house keeper play after "closing hours"?
   Ans. Yes, until one in the morning. (Bent v. Lester, 52 J.P., 389.)
   Ques. If a publican holds a six-day licence, and is not allowed to serve travellers or any person whatever on the Sunday, would he be indictable if he sold liquor to a person lodging in his house?
   Ans. No. (37 and 38 Vic., C. 49, S. 10.)
   Ques. At what time must licensed refreshment-houses close?
   Ans. The same time as public-houses.
   Ques. But when may they open when public-houses cannot?
   Ans. At 4 am, each morning, and on Sunday, Christmas Day, and Good Friday from 4 am, to proper closing time at night.
   Ques. If it came to your knowledge that a publican was giving a toy to each child who purchased drink at his house, what should you do?
   Ans. Caution him, and report full particulars to Commissioner.
   Ques. What special places do not come under the Licensing Acts in regard to "closing hours"?
   Ans. Refreshment bars at railway stations, on packets, boats, and other vessels employed for the conveyance of passengers.
   Ques. If it came to your knowledge that a prize-fight was going to take place in the tap-room of a public-house, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Obtain particulars, including the names of the intended principals, and time and date when to take place, also at what public-house, and report as speedily as possible for directions: lf there was insufficient time to obtain such directions, adopt the best practical measures by seeing that a sufficient number of police was held in readiness to apprehend all concered, especially the principals.
   Ques. You see three men in a public-house during prohibited hours, and also see one pay for thinks for all. When you gain admission they refuse their names and addresses - what would you do?
   Ans. Obtain assistance and convey them to the station, where, if they still declined their names and addresses, they should be charged; also report landlord for a summons.
   [-48-] Ques. Can a publican holding a six-day licence serve a bona fide traveller on a Sunday?
   Ans. No ; he has no licence for sale on that day. (37 and 38 Vic., C. 49, S. 10.)
   Ques. What exception is there to the three-mile qualification?
   Ans. A person who has taken a railway ticket is a traveller, and is entitled to be served with intoxicating liquor at the refreshment-room of a railway station, irrespective of the distance he may have travelled.
   Ques. Under what ages is a publican prohibited from selling intoxicating liquors (beer and spirits) to children for consumption on the premises?
   Ans. Beer, apparently under thirteen years of age; spirits, apparently under sixteen years of age. (49 and 50 Vic, C. 56, S. 1; 35 and 36 Vic., C. 94,  S. 7.)
   Ques. What steps would you take if you noticed that the name of occupier and particulars required by the Act were not placed in a conspicuous position on such licensed premises?
   Ans. Enter the premises and demand to see the licence, copy particulars thereof, and report for summons. (35 and 36 Vic., C. 94, S. 11.)
   Ques. When would a publican be liable to a penalty for being drunk on his own premises?
   Ans. When found drunk there while the premises are open to the public.
   Ques. If you saw a man drunk in a public-house, what steps should you take?
   Ans. Call landlord's attention to the condition of the man, take the man's name and address, expel him, and report for a summons ; also the landlord, if he permitted it. Should the man be disorderly on being ejected, take him into custody and charge him with being "drunk and disorderly."
   Ques. Who may be supplied with intoxicating liquor by a publican during prohibited hours?
   Ans. Any inmate, servant or lodger in such premises ; any bond fide traveller; also any private guest of the publican, genuinely entertained by him at his own expense.
   Ques. What is meant by a bona fide traveller?
   Ans. A person who has travelled at least three miles by the nearest public thoroughfare from the place where he lodged the previous night; but the object of the journey, which may either be pleasure or business, must not be to obtain drink.
   [-49-] 
   Ques. Would a man who had been supplied with intoxicating liquor as a bona fide traveller at a public-house be entitled to be served immediately afterwards at another public-house in the same village?
   Ans. No ; for he is then not a bona fide traveller, but only travelling for the purpose of obtaining drinks.
   Ques. Whom may a publican refuse to admit or turn off his licensed premises?
   Ans. Any person who is drunk, quarrelsome, violent or disorderly; and any person whose presence on his premises would subject him to a penalty.
   Ques. What persons' (see question above) presence would subject him to a penalty?
   Ans. Prostitutes, reputed thieves, policemen on duty under certain circumstances.
   Ques. When may the police enter licensed premises?
   Ans. At all times for the purpose of preventing or detecting any violation of the Licensing Acts, 1872 and 1874.
   Ques. How many forms of drunkenness are there for which arrests may be made?
   Ans. Five: (1) drunkenness in a public place ; (2) drunk and disorderly; (3) drunk while in charge of any carriage, horse, cattle or steam engine ; (4) drunk and in possession of fire-arms ; (5) drunk while in charge of a child under 7 years of age. (See page 33.)
   Ques. What points would you attend to when making inquiries re an application to sell intoxicating liquors on a special occasion during prohibited hours?
   Ans. (1) The cause for granting; (2) the hours for which it is required ; (3) the time at which any entertainment is proposed to begin and terminate ; (4) the general mode in which the house is conducted.
   Ques. What steps would you take on ascertaining that a public-house is frequented by prostitutes?
   Ans. In company with another officer call the landlord's attention to the fact that there were then prostitutes in his house; go out and keep observation for a time, and if the women had not then come out, call attention of landlord to it, and inform him that the matter would be reported.
   Ques. What would you do if the landlord of a public-house wanted to give a man into custody for refusing to quit?
   Ans. Inform him I could not do so legally, but if he wished it, I would eject the man and endeavour to obtain his name and address for landlord to summon him.
   [-50-]
   Ques.  You see a man drunk, and having in his possession a loaded revolver-what steps?
   Ans. Arrest and charge him. Penalty 40s.
   Ques. Is a pilot allowed to keep a public-house?
   Ans. No ; he would be disqualified from acting as a pilot if he did so.
   Ques. Does a person holding a victualler's licence require a billiard licence? and at what time must customers leave off playing?
   Ans. No; customers must heave off playing when the house closes. (9 Geo. IV., C. 67.)
   Ques. Does a beer-house keeper require a licence to permit billiard playing?
   Ans. Yes; he pays for same to the Clerk of Justice 5s., and to the constable who serves the notice 1s. (8 and 9 Vic., C. 109, S. 10.)
   Ques. What must a licensed billiard-table keeper have distinctly painted over his door?
   Ans. The words "Licensed for Billiards."
   Ques. Between what hours and on what days are customers prohibited from playing billiards on premises which are licensed?
   Ans. Between 1 a.m. and 8 a.m., Sundays, Christmas Days and Good Fridays.
   Ques. What are the hours during which premises "licensed for billiards " are allowed to be open?
   Ans. Between 8 a.m. and 1 a.m.
   Ques. Between what hours in the "special limits" must beer, etc., and coal not be loaded or unloaded across a footway, also removal of dust? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. Between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. (Wines, spirits and coke are exempt.)
   Ques. What will make it an offence to load or unload beer, etc., across the footway within the "special limits"? (Metropolitan
   Ans. That it is done with ropes or chains. To carry coals across is an offence.
   Ques. Why are wines and spirits exempt?
   Ans. Because the Customs do not allow them to be taken out of Bond before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
   Ques. If you were on duty within the "special limits," and you saw a brewer's drayman unloading casks of ale at 12.30 p.m., what would you do? (Metropolitan.)
   [-51-] Ans. Report him for a summons.
   Ques. Also if you saw the same man unloading casks of wine at the same time and place? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. No offence.
   Ques. During what time is cattle prohibited from being driven through Charing Cross? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. Between 10 a.m.and 7 p.m.
   Ques. Your attention is called to a public-house where a number of persons are drinking during prohibited hours ; all gave names and addresses when requested, except one, who refused. What would you do?
   Ans. Take the one who refused his name and address into custody and charge him. Tell the others they will be reported for a summons. Call landlord's attention to time and drink being consumed, and tell him he will also be reported for a summons.
   Ques. Does a music and dancing licence entitle the holder to sell intoxicating liquors on the premises?
   Ans. No. A theatre licence does.
   Ques. Under what circumstances would you apprehend a person who was found "drunk"?
   Ans. When the name and address are unknown to the constable, or the person is incapable of self-control.
   Ques. During what hours is a person not allowed to keep open a house for public refreshment, resort and entertainment without a licence?
   Ans. 10 p.m., and 5 a.m. (37 and 38 Vic.)
   Ques. Would the owner of a shop, consisting of a small room in front, without seats, where persons simply drank ginger-beer or lemonade at the counter after 10 p.m. and went away, be required to have a licence?
   Ans. Yes. (Howse v. Inland Revenue, 41 L.J., 423.)

PREVENTION OF CRIMES ACT 1871.

   Ques. If a person has been already couivictecl, after the elapse of what time from his liberation could he not be found guilty of an offence under this Act?
   Ans. Seven years (Sec. 7)
   Ques. If charged with au offence within that time, what would his punishment be?
   Ans. Imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, with or without hard labour (Sec. 7).
   Ques. For what offences would the police be justified in arresting such a person?

[-52-] Ans. (1) Getting his hiving by dishonest means. 
(2) On being charged with any offence, refusing to give his name and address, or giving false ones.
(3) Being found in any place, public or private, under suspicious circumstances.

   Ques. If such a person is twice convicted under this Act, what further punishment than imprisonment may the court order him?
   Ans. Police supervision, not exceeding seven years. 
    Ques. What does Crime mean in this Act?
    Ans. Any felony, or the offence of uttering false or counterfeit coin, or of possessing counterfeit gold or silver coin, or the offence of obtaining goods or money by false pretences, or the offence of conspiracy to defraud, or any misdemeanour under 24 and 25 Vic., C. 96,  S.58 (Burglary, etc.).
   Ques. When a convict on licence arrives in a district, what is he bound to do?
   Ans. Within forty-eight hours of his arrival personally to report himself at the station in the district and give his address.
   Ques. If he changes his address, what must he do?
   Ans. Notify the change at the station where he has been reporting himself, and within forty-eight hours also report himself at the nearest police station in the district where he is going to live.
   Ques. What evidence is necessary to be given before a magistrate on a licence holder being charged with failing to report?

Ans.  1.-Officer to prove last tonviction.
2.-Officers on duty on the date he should have reported between 9 am, and 9 p.m.
3.-The officer who served him with the Notice Form 2.
4.-The occupier of house where licence holder alleged he was living.

   Ques. To convict a person of receiving stolen goods, what evidence must be given and proved?
   Ans. That he knew the goods were stolen. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 96; R. v. Densley ; R. v. Prince.)

   SWEEPS, ETC.

   Ques. At what age would it be lawful for a chimney-sweep to employ a child in or about his trade or business?
   [-53-] Ans. Age ten. (27 and 28 Vic., C. 37, S. 6.) 
    Ques. At what age may he apprentice a child?
    Ans. Age sixteen. 3 and 4 Vic., C. 85, S. 3.) 
    Ques. Is it lawful for a chimney-sweep to solicit employment by knocking at doors or ringing bells?
   Ans. No. (57 and 58 Vic., C. 51, S.1.)
   Ques. If you saw a sweep soliciting employment by ringing bells, etc , what steps would you take?
   Ans. Request him to produce his certificate (if a master), copy particulars thereof, and report bin for a summons, also obtain names, etc., of persons annoyed.
   Ques. Is it necessary for the persons so annoyed to attend Police Court at hearing of summons?
   Ans. Yes ; they are to be requested to attend to prove annoyance.
   Ques Does a journeyman or an apprenitice employed by a master require a certificate?
   Ans. No. (38 and 39 Vic, C. 70, S. 9.)
   
Ques. If you asked a sweep for his name and address, and he refused to give it, what would you do?
   Ans. Obtain it from someone who knew him, with a view to summons. No power of arrest under the Act.
   Ques. When does a sweep require a certificate?
   Ans. When he employs an assistant journeyman or apprentice.
   Ques. From whom can the certificate be obtained, and at what price?
   Ans. From police of district where he resides 2s. 6d.
   Ques. How is the application to be made?
   Ans. In writing, and delivered at the police station nearest to where he resides.
   Ques. If two men form a partnership as chimney-sweeps, must they each take out a certificate?
   Ans. No; one certificate for partners will be sufficient. (38 and 39 Vic., S. 8.)

TRAMS, ETC.

   Ques. At what rate must a tram car travel?
   Ans. Not less than six nor more than nine miles an hour.
   Ques. What is the least distance to be kept between trams following each other on same metals?
   Ans. 100 yards, except at junction points and on a single line.
   Ques. If a tram is stopping on one line of metals, and [-54-] another tram on a parallel set of metals stops level or nearly level to the other one, is the driver liable?
   Ans. Yes the by-laws under the Tramways Act, 1870, say, " No carriage using a tramway shall stop within ten yards of another carriage on a parallel line of tramway."
   Ques. What should the driver of an omnibus or other stage carriage do while driving on a tramway when he has to stop to take up or set down passengers?
   Ans. Draw up as close to the kerb as possible. (Same Act.)
   Ques. What coloured light must not be used on a tramcar? (Metropolitan.)
   Ans. Red.
   Ques. If you were called by the conductor of a tram car to a person who has refused his fare, what steps would you take?
   Ans. Take him into custody ; conductor or an official of company must attend station to charge him.

WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

   Ques. For what purpose was the Criminal Law Amendment Act passed?
   Ans. For the protection of women and girls, and the suppression of brothels.
   Ques. Describe the felonies created by the Criminal Law Amendment Act.
   Ans.  (1) Having carnal knowledge of any girl under thirteen; (2) the owner, occupier, manager or assistant manager of any premises who induces or knowingly suffers any girl under the age of thirteen years to resort to or be upon such premises for the purpose of being carnally known by any man, whether by any particular man or generally, shall be guilty of felony. (3) Any man who induces a married woman to permit him to have connection with her, by personating her husband, shall be guilty of rape.
   Ques. Who should attend to any case under the Criminal Law Amendment Act?
   Ans. An inspector, if possible.
   Ques. What is the difference between the first of these felonies and rape?
   Ans. It is a felony under this Act to have carnal connection with a girl under thirteen, even although she consents but rape can only be committed against the will of the female.
   [-55-] Ques. Have the police power to order the medical examination of persons against their will, whether charged with such an offence or not?
   Ans. No ; but as it is expedient that persons charged with this or any similar offence should be medically examined, and preferably without delay, it is suggested that the police should clearly state to them that it is proposed to examine them, and that they have a right to object if they like (24 and 25 Vic., C.100).
   Ques. Under what circumstances would it be a misdemeanour to induce or knowingly suffer a girl to resort to or be on premises for the purpose of having carnal connection with anybody?
    Ans. The owner, manager or assistant manager of such premises is guilty of a misdemeanour if the girl is of or above the age of thirteen, but under sixteen years.
    Ques. What would be a sufficient defence to a charge of this nature?
   Ans. To prove that the defendant had reasonable cause to believe that the girl was of or above the age of sixteen.
    Ques. To what other charge would this be a sufficient defence?
    Ans. To a charge of having or attempting to have unlawful carnal knowledge of any girl of or above thirteen, but under sixteen years of age.
    Ques. Within what period must a prosecution for having or attempting to have carnal knowledge of a girl between thirteen and sixteen be commenced?
    Ans. Within three months of the commission of the offence.
   Ques. Regarding what two offences under this Act may the unsworn evidence of a child of tender years be received?
    Ans. Defilement or attempted defilement of a girl under thirteen years of age.
    Ques. Can a person be convicted on this evidence only.
    Ans. No ; it must be corroborated by some other materiel evidence implicating the accused.
    Ques. When would it be a misdemeanour to detain a woman against her will?
    Ans. When she is detained upon premises with intent that she may be unlawfully and carnally known by any man, whether by any particular man or generally, or when she is detained in any brothel.
   Ques. When is a woman deemed to be unlawfully detained for immoral purposes?
   [-56-] Ans. When she is detained for the purpose of being unlawfully and carnally known by any man, whether any particular man or generally, and is under the age of sixteen years ; or if above the age of sixteen years, and under the age of eighteen years, is so detained against her will, or against the will of her father or mother, or any person having the lawful care or charge of her, or, if of or above the age of eighteen years, is so detained against her will.
    Ques. Before a woman could be convicted of an attempt to conceal the birth of her child, what is necessary?
    Ans. A dead body must be found and identified as that of the child of which she is alleged to have been delivered. (24 and 25 Vic., C. 100, S. 60.)
    Ques. If a husband and wife are living apart by mutual consent, is it desertion?
    Ans. No. (Page v. Page.)
    Ques. When may a wife be committed as an accessory before the fact?
    Ans. When she incites him to commit a felony. (I Hale, 516)
    Ques. When cannot a wife be convicted of larceny, burglary, forgery, or of uttering forged notes ?
    Ans. When she is doing it under the fear and direction of her husband.
   Ques. If children are causing an annoyance by trundling their hoops in a public thoroughfare, what should you do?
    Ans. Caution them, and inform them that their hoops will be taken from them if repeated. If their parents complain of your action, refer them to a magistrate, and attend Police Court yourself.
    Ques. If a single woman held an Excise licence, would her marriage make the licence void?
    Ans. No. (Hazell v. Middleton, 45 J.P., 540.)
    Ques. When may a person be prosecuted for ill-treating or neglecting a child
    Ans. When the person is over sixteen years of age, and has the custody, control or charge of such child.
   Ques. Describe the misdemeanour created by this Act (Prevention of Cruelty to Children), and for which such person can be prosecuted.
    Ans. Wilfully ill-treating, neglecting, abandoning or exposing, or causing or procuring to be ill-treated, neglected, abandoned or exposed, any child - being a boy under fourteen [-57-] or a girl under sixteen years of age - in a manner likely to cause such child unnecessary suffering or injury to its health.
    Ques. If an officer was alone in charge of a station, and a female prisoner had attempted violence on herself, should he enter the cell alone
    Ans. Yes, if no available second person was at hand, and restrain her. He should then make a report of the particulars.
    Ques. If a girl is to be sent to a reformatory, should a P.C. only be sent with her?
   Ans. No ; the matron, or other respectable woman selected by the superintendent, should accompany them.
    Ques. While acting as station sergeant, you have some children in custody - would you send them to the workhouse?
    Ans. No ; they must go before a magistrate first.
    Ques. When would it be an offence for a person to send a child into the street to beg or receive alms?
    Ans. When the child is a boy under fourteen or a girl under sixteen years of age, and is in the street for the purpose of begging or receiving alms, or inducing the giving of alms, whether under the pretence of singing, playing, performing, offering anything for sale, or otherwise.
    Ques. When would it be an offence to cause a boy under fourteen or a girl under sixteen years of age to be in any street, or on premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, although not for the purpose of begging or receiving alms ?
    Ans. When the child is in such a place for the purpose of singing, playing or performing for profit, or offering anything for sale between 9 p.m., and 6 a.m.
    Ques. What restrictions are placed on the employment of children under eleven years of age?
    Ans. It is an offence to cause or procure a child under the age of eleven years to be at any time in any street, or on premises licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors, or on premises licensed according to law for public entertainments, or in any circus or other place of public amusement to which the public are admitted by payment, for the purpose of singing, playing, performing for profit, or offering anything for sale.
    Ques. Over what age can a child he trained as an acrobat, contortionist, or circus performer, or for being trained for any exhibition or performance which in its nature is dangerous?
    [-58-] Ans. Sixteen years of age, with one exception, that the child is being trained by its parents or legal guardian.
   Ques. What powers of arrest have you under this Act?
   Ans. I can arrest for any offence committed within my view, when I do not know and cannot ascertain the name and address of the offender.
    Ques. What may be done with a person arrested without a warrant under this Act?
    Ans. He may he released on bail by the officer who takes the charge, unless the officer believes that his release would tend to defeat the ends of justice, or cause injury or changer to the child against whom the offence is committed.
    Ques. From whom can a warrant to search for a child suspected of being ill-treated or neglected be obtained?
    Ans. From one resident magistrate or two Justices of Peace, or in case of urgency, which should be stated in the warrant, one Justice of Peace.
   Ques. What must the warrant authorise before doors can be broken open?
    Ans. To search, take and detain the child in a place of safety.
    Ques. At what age is a person assumed to be cognisant of the law?
    Ans. Fourteen years of age.
    Owes. If you saw a boy begging and annoying persons using a urinal, what would you do?
    Ans. Arrest him and charge him under the Vagrancy Act.
    Owes. A living new-born child is found by a police officer - within what number of days should he attend at the office of registration of births for the purpose of having it registered?
    Ans. Seven days. (37 and 38 Vic., C. 88, S. 3.)
    Ques. A child of tender years is brought to the station charged with an offence - what would you do?
    Ans. In case of girls or children of tender years, I should detain them, and, if necessary, send for the matron to take charge of them.
    Ques. On sending a girl to an industrial school, what necessary steps are to be taken?
    Ans. Send a constable accompanied by the matron, or some other respectable female approved of by the superintendent.
   Ques. You are on station duty, and a constable brings a man to the station for committing a rape on a girl aged sixteen, four months previously, and it has just come to the [-59-] knowledge of friends, and they give him in custody. What would you do? take or refuse the charge?
    Ans. I should refuse charge; proceedings had not been commenced within three months after offence had been committed. (48 and 49 Vic.,  C. 69, s.5) 
   Ques. Under the Prevention of Cruelty to Children Act, what is the time limit under which proceedings can be taken?
    Ans. Six months.
   Ques. What are the ages of children found in brothels to be specially reported?
    Ans. Girls from four to sixteen years, boys from six to fourteen years.
   Ques. You are on station duty, and a P.C. brings a child to the station who has deserted from an industrial school - what action would you take?
    Ans. Ask the child why it ran away, and how treated at the school, carefully writing down all questions and answers. If the case was an ordinary one, send the child back to the school ; but if there appeared to be any circumstances demanding an inquiry, then charge the child so that it can be taken before a magistrate. Report full particulars to the Commissioner.
   Ques. Under what age cannot a child be charged?
    Ans. Seven years of age.
    Ques. Who is entitled to the custody of a child - the father or the mother? and to what age?
    Ans. The father; till the age of discretion - fourteen.
    Ques. If information was given you that a woman had been murdered in a house, what would you do?
    Ans. Go at once to the house, detain the murderer, send for divisional surgeon, to police station, and carefully see that the body is not allowed to be disturbed before arrival of doctor, nothing to be removed from the room or house, keep all unauthorised persons out, note carefully appearance and position of body and surroundings, decline to give information to reporters, etc., inform coroner and his officer.

MISCELLANEOUS.

    Ques. What is a "highway"?
    Ans. A highway is a passage which is open to all the King's subjects, and may be either (1) a footway ; (2) a foot and horse way ; or (3) a foot, horse, cart or carriage way. It need not be a thoroughfare.
    [-60-] Ques. How many J.P.'s signatures are necessary to issue a summons, and how many to hear it?
    Ans. One to issue, and two to hear it. (11 and 12 Vic., C. 43.)
   Ques. What are servants waiting at theatres, etc., for their employers not to do?
    Ans. To cause obstruction or inconvenience to traffic or public by waiting on the footwavs.
    Ques. Is a blind person bound to take out a licence for the dog which guides him about?
    Ans. No. (41 Vic., C. 15.)
    Ques. Would it be lawful for a person to take a lad to the police station for wilfully extinguishing a gas lamp in the street?
    Ans. Yes. (Metropolis Management Act, 1855, S. 206.)
    Ques. Is it an unlawful offence to set a trap in a garden to catch cats trespassing there?
    Ans. No. (Bryan v. Eaton ; 24 and 25 Vic., C. 97.)
    Ques. If a person carelessly put some money (coins) in a letter, and some slipped out into the letter box, whose property would it become?
    Ans. The Postmaster-General's. (R. v. Rathbone.)
    Ques. If a man takes or receives a letter supposing it belongs to himself; and on finding it does not, appropriates its contents, could he be charged with larceny?
    Ans. No; because there was no intention to steal when he first received the letter. He would be charged with embezzlement. (R. v. Mucklow, and R. v. Davis.)
    Ques. If persons had fraudulently removed their goods from a house to avoid paying the rent of same, and the landlord can trace them, and also knows the persons who assisted in the removal, what can he do?
    Ans. The landlord, after application to a magistrate, may break open house, etc., to seize goods fraudulently secured therein ; but the presence of a constable is required upon breaking open a place locked up. (Rich v. Woolley.)
    Ques. If the tenant of a house came and requested you to remove a destitute lodger from his house, what would you do?
    Ans. Refer him to relieving officer.
    Ques. Has a coroner an absolute right to hold an inquest in any cases he chooses?
    Ans. No; to justify him he must have reasonable grounds [-61-]for believing that the death was caused by unnatural means. (R. v. Stephenson.)
   Ques. What is the keeper of a common lodging-house bound to do twice a year?
    Ans. Limewash the walls and ceilings thereof in the first week of each of the months of April and October in every year. Penalty 40s. (38 and 39 Vic., C. 55.)
   Ques. If a person wished to erect a platform intended to be let or used for the purpose of affording sitting or standing accommodation for a number of persons to view a show or entertainment, whose certificate must be obtained to certify it is safely constructed and secure?
    Ans. The surveyor of parish. (53 and 54 Vic., C. 59)
   Ques. If the guardians of a parish wished to apprentice a lad from the workhouse to a shipping firm for sea service, who must witness the indentures?
    Ans. Two J.P.s, and they are to ascertain his consent and his age - over twelve, etc. (17 and 18 Vic., C. 104; Merchant Shipping Act, 1854.)
    Ques. In stormy weather would the captain be justified in making fast to a lightship or buoy?
    Ans. No.
   Ques. A man who has attempted suicide is being watched by police in hospital what are the steps to be taken when fit to be discharged?
    Ans. Inquire if his friends are willing to take charge of him, then submit a report to Commissioner for instructions whether he is to be handed over to them, or a warrant applied for.
   Ques. What are the regulations with respect to the conveyance of scenery, ladders and poles, etc., within the "special limits"? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. No article shall exceed 35 feet in length, or 8 feet over tail-board, or 1 foot from the side of a vehicle, or 8 feet broad, between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
    Ques. What authorities may convey poles or ladders which exceed the dimensions allowed through the "special limits" during prohibited hours ? (Metropolitan.)
    Ans. Postal Telegraph Department and Works Department (London County Council), when going to shore up dangerous structures.
   Ques. What persons not being on the roll may act as solicitors ?
    [-62-] Ans. Clerks to Boards of Guardians. (7 and 8 Vic., C. 101, S 68.)
   Ques. What is the meaning of "casual ward"?
    Ans. Any ward or wards, building or premises, set apart or provided for the reception and relief of destitute wayfarers or wanderers. (34 and 35 Vic., C. 108.)
   Ques. If it comes to your knowledge that certain persons are in training for a prize fight, what would you do?
    Ans. Report without delay the circumstances, and obtain evidence to identify them and prove the intention.
   Ques. If a man refuses to show his ticket when travelling on a railway, is it lawful for you to arrest him?
    Ans. Yes, if he refuses his name and address, and is given into custody by a railway official under their by-laws.
   Ques. What is the legal meaning of "adult"?
    Ans. A person who in the opinion of the Court before whon he is brought is of the age of sixteen or upwards. (42 and 43 Vic., c. 49.)
   Ques. Can a master dismiss an apprentice for misconduct?
    Ans. No, unless the indentures contain a stipulation to that effect. (Phillips v. Clift, 28 L. J.)
    Ques. What steps would you take if a building collapsed, burying several persons in the debris?
    Ans. Blow whistle for assistance, send to station for aid, for nearest doctor, to district surveyor and London County Council's architect, inform Fire Brigade and Gas Company. If water is escaping, send for turncock, and endeavour to rescue the buried persons, also see that traffic is regulated.
    Ques. What cards are exempt from stamp duty?
    Ans. Toy cards, not exceeding in length 1 inches, or in width 1 inches.
    Ques. Is it compulsory for a baker to weigh the bread in the customer's presence?
    Ans. No ; but if the weight is deficient, it raises a presumption that the bread has never been weighed. (R. v. Kennet, 42 B., 565)
   Ques. Are bakers allowed to make or bake bread on Sundays at all?
   Ans. No.
    Ques. But what may they do on that day?
   Ans. Take in "bakings," and sell bread only between 9 a.m. and 1.30 p.m.; and prepare the "sponge" for the next day's bread. (Bread Act, 1836, 6 and 7 Will. IV., C. 37, S. 14.)
   [-65-] Ques. If the term of imprisonment of a prisoner in gaol expires on a Sunday, when must he be discharged?
    Ans. On the previous Saturday. (28 and 29 Vic., C. 126, S.41)
   Ques. May methylated spirit be sold on Sunday?
    Ans. No; prohibited front 10 p.m. on Saturday to 8 a m. on Monday. (52 and 53 Vic., C.42.)
    Ques. If a P.C. makes an apprehension for smuggling or carrying contraband goods, what steps should he take?
    Ans. Convey the prisoner to the nearest station, and forward a message to the nearest Customs officer, who will attend to make the seizure.
    Ques. If you saw destitute persons sleeping out in the open, what would you do?
    Ans. Direct them to nearest casual ward. If they persisted in sleeping out in the streets, then take them into custody and charge them under the Vagrant Act.
    Ques. If you knew of them seeking shelter in cellars or other such places, what would you do?
    Ans. Report full particulars for Commissioner to communicate with local authority.
    Ques. If goods are seen being removed between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m., what should you do?
    Ans. Take name and address of proprietor and number of van, and enter same in occurrence book.
    Ques. Who does Trafalgar Square belong to, and who looks after it?
    Ans. Crown property, and looked after by Commissioners of Woods and Buildings. (14 and 15 Vic., c. 42, S. 22)
    Ques. What is "forgery"?
    Ans. The fraudulent making or alteration of a writing to the prejudice of another's rights (Blackstone.)
   Ques. Would it be forgery if a person sold a picture with the imitation of a painter's name on it?
    Ans. No; a picture is not a document. (Archibald.)
    Ques. Can hay or straw be sold loose within the "general limits"?
    Ans. No; they must be made up in bundles or trusses. (36 Geo. III., c. 88.)
    Ques. What weight must a truss of old hay and a truss of straw be respectively?
    Ans. 56 lb. hay; 36 lb. straw.
    Ques. May a person expose horseflesh for sale for human [-64-] food in the country; if so, what conditions must be complied with?
    Ans. It must be sold or exposed only in a shop, stall or place, over or upon which there shall be at all times painted, posted or placed in legible characters of not less than four inches length, and in a conspicuous position, words indicating that horseflesh is sold there.
    Ques. What is the duty of every person who sells arsenic? 
    Ans. To enter the particulars of sale in a book kept for the purpose.
    Ques. What age must a person be before arsenic can be legally sold to him.
    Ans. Of full age.
    Ques. Under what restrictions can a seller sell arsenic to a person unknown to him?
    Ans. In the presence of a witness who is known to the seller, the former to sign his name and address first.
    Ques. If an apprentice lives with his master, is the latter bound to provide medical attendance for the lad if required, and also for a servant kept by the master?
    Ans. Yes for the apprentice; no for the servant. (R. v. Smith.)
    Ques. Before a constable can apprehend a waterman and take him out of his boat, what must he do first?
    Ans. See the boat safely moored, unless there are sufficient hands on board to row or navigate or take care thereof. (Watermen's Act, 1859.)
    Ques. What does a "month" mean in an Act of Parliament?
    Ans. A calendar month, and since 185), where the word month appears in any Act, it means calendar month. (52 and 53 Vic., C. 63, S. 3.)
    Ques. What is the difference between "larceny" and "obtaining goods by false pretences"?
    Ans. In larceny the owner of the stolen thing has no intention of parting with his property therein to the person taking it. In "false pretences" the owner has such intention, but the money or chattel was obtained from him by fraud. (24 and 25 Vic, C. 99.)
   Ques. If an ex-solicitor is charged at a station with an offence, how is he to be described on charge sheet?
    Ans. "Formerly a solicitor."
    Ques. What is "arson"?
    Ans. The malicious and voluntary burning of the house of [-65-] another, and there must be an actual burning of some part of the house. (24 and 25 Vie., C. 97.)
    (To set fire to one's own house is not a felony; if others be near, it is a misdemeanour; but if a man by wilfully setting fire to his own house burn that of his neighbour, this amounts to arson at common law.1 Hale, 568, 569)
    Ques. Would it be arson if the woodwork was only charred and no flames seen?
    Ans. Yes. (24 and 25 Vic., c. 97)
    Ques. What is "larceny"?
    Ans. The wrongful taking and carrying away of the personal goods of anyone from his possession with a felonious intent to convert them to the use of the offender, without the consent of the owner. (24 and 25 Vic., c. 95.)
    Ques. If you see some clothes hanging out in a garden at night, what should you do?
    Ans. Call the owner's attention to it, and the risk he runs from thieves, enter particulars and name and address in pocket-book, and show them to section P.S.
    Ques. You are aware that there is a fire raging in one of the houses in a terrace. What scheme or plan would you adopt to find out in which house the fire was, without arousing and alarming the inmates of the other houses in the row?
    Ans. Look for any illumination, or failing that, smell keyholes or under doors for smoke.
    Ques. Under what circumstances is it lawful for Ambassadors and their suites to be arrested?
    Ans. Where an attempt is made against the life of the Sovereign.
    Ques. If you were called to a public library to a man who is disorderly, doing wilful damage and using bad language, what steps would you take?
    Ans. Have the man ejected, and if an official will charge him, take him into custody.
    (Under the Library Offences Act, 1898, police have no power of arrest. Proceedings should be by summons. Police may assist in ejecting, etc., therefrom only.)
    Ques. What must be shown before police action is taken against hawkers of newspapers shouting in the streets?
    Ans. That it has caused or is causing annoyance to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood. (London and Middlesex County Councils By-law.)
    [-66-] Ques. What steps should be taken in above case? 
    Ans. Take name and address of the offender, and submit full particulars for a summons.
    Ques. What height, at least, must the sill of a window be, and what must be proved before action can be taken against persons cleaning windows?
    Ans. Six feet from the ground immediately beneath it. That no sufficient support was there to prevent such persons from falling.
    Ques. Who is liable in above case?
    Ans. The employer and employé. (London County Council By-Law.)
   Ques. How should a constable, etc., proceed in taking action in such a case?
    Ans. Call the employer's and employ&s attention to the danger and infringement of by-law, and report full particulars.
    Ques. If a vehicle is laden with scaffold poles, timber, etc., and which projects more than six feet beyond the rear of the vehicle, what is the owner bound to attend to?
    Ans. To see that a lamp, showing a red light at the back, is so constructed and placed as to make the light visible within a reasonable distance to persons overtaking the vehicle. (Surrey County Council By-law, 1900.)
    Ques. If a person was suddenly taken ill in the street, or met with an accident, and a member of the St. John Ambulance offered his aid, would you accept it?
    Ans. Yes.
    Ques. When would you decline it?
    Ans. When the accident or illness is too serious for his skill.
    Ques. What should you do then?
    Ans. Remove sufferer to the hospital without delay, and report the circumstance of the "Aid" being offered and declined.
   Ques. Under what circumstances would you remove such a sufferer to the workhouse?
    Ans. When he, or she, cannot be removed to a hospital or to his or her home.
    Ques. If the magistrate has committed a person to an inebriates' home, what must be done before the person is conveyed there?
    Ans. Ask for a remand or adjournment for the proper form to be filled in by medical man, and signed by [-67-] superintendent and doctor. Then to be returned to the Police Court authorities to be sent to manager of the home.
    Ques If a Bank of England note is brought to the station, what is the officer in charge to do? (Metropolitan)
    Ans. Make inquiry at the Bank to find out whether the note has been notified as lost, and if not, supply number of note, and name of station where it is deposited.
    Ques What is "treasure trove"?
    Ans. Money or coin, gold, silver, plate or bullion found hidden, the owner thereof being unknown. It belongs to the King if the owner or hider is unknown or is not afterwards discovered. Larceny cannot be committed of such things, but the concealment of treasure trove is punishable by fine or imprisonment
   Ques. If a factory inspector requested you to accompany him into a workshop where he expects to meet with opposition what would you do?
    Ans. Ask the inspector to show you his certificate of appointment before accompanying him there.
    Ques. If while there the inspector wishes you to take into custody a person for obstructing him in his duty, what would you do?
    Ans. Refer him to magistrate for a summons and see that no breach of the peace occurs. (1 Edw. VII. C 12.)
   Ques. If a factory inspector applies at the station for assistance, who should accompany him?
    Ans. A sergeant, if possible
    Ques. What power of arrest have you in the case of a false alarm of fire?
    Ans. For wilful damage.
    Ques. Can a false alarm be given in any other manner than by wilful damage?
    Ans. Yes, by means of a false statement, message or otherwise; Penalty not exceeding £20. (58 & 59 Vict. C. 28.)

 INFECTIOUS DISEASES WITHIN METROPOLIS

    Ques. Under the Public Health Act, London, 1891, what persons are under a penalty for exposure of infected persons and things.
   Ans. (a) Those who, while suffering from any dangerous infectious disease, wilfully expose themselves without proper precautions against spreading the said disease in any street, public place or shop.
(b) [-68-] Or, being in charge of any person so suffering, so exposes such sufferer.
(c) Or, who gives, lends, sells, transmits, removes or exposes without previous disinfection, any bedding. clothing, or other articles which have been exposed to infection from any such disease.
(d) Also, a person who knows himself to he suffering from a dangerous infectious disease, shall milk any animal, or pick fruit, and shall engage in any occupation connected with food or carry on any trade or business in such a manner as to be likely to spread the infectious disease. (Penalty not exceeding £10.)

FOR SCOTCH POLICE.

   Ques. What are the two kinds of pensions granted?
   Ans. Ordinary and special.
   Ques. What is an "ordinary" pension?
   Ans. One granted for, at least, twenty years' continuous service, and subject to certain qualifying conditions, such as being medically certified unfit for further duty, deductions for sickness, misconduct, etc. ; or, having completed twenty-five years service, and being fifty-five years of age for a P.C. or P.S.. or sixty for an officer above that rank, he may retire without a medical certificate.
    Ques. What is a "special" pension?
    Ans. One granted to constables who are incapacitated for duty by infirmity of mind or body, caused by injury received in the execution of duty without their own default (Police (Scotland) Act, 1890).
    Ques. How many persons must there be assembled together in any street or open place for the purpose of gambling, betting, or engaging in lotteries, to constitute an offence?
    Ans. Two or more (Burgh Police Act, 1892).
    Ques. Who grants the licences to owners of cabs?
    Ans. The magistrates (same Act).
    Ques. Under what age and after what hour are children, in  Burghs, not allowed to sell newspapers without a licence?
    Ans. Twelve years; nine p.m.
    [-69-]
    Ques. Who are also liable for supplying them with newspapers to sell?
    Ans. Parents, guardians, and any other person (same Act).
    Ques. What are the conditions of the licence granted to convicts when on ticket of leave?

Ans. (1) The holder of a licence shall preserve it and produce it when called upon to do so by a magistrate or police officer.
(2) He shall abstain from any violation of the law.
(3) He shall not habitually associate within notoriously bad characters, such as reputed thieves and prostitutes.
(4) He shall not lead an idle and dissolute life, without visible means of gaining an honest livelihood.

    Ques. Is it compulsory for persons who find any lost property to hand it over to the police ?
    Ans. No ; but they should inform the police so that the owner may be discovered. In Burghs they must hand it over within forty-eight hours.
    Ques. If a riot unexpectedly breaks out, what should you do?
    Ans. Summon assistance, arrest the ringleaders, and report to your superior officers.
   Ques If you have knowledge that a serious disturbance or riot is likely to happen, what should you do?
    Ans. At once report what you know, in order that steps may be taken to prevent it.
    Ques. If you are called to the scene of a murder, what should you particularly do?
    Ans. Note the hour; observe and note the appearance of body, limbs, and features, and condition of the clothing of deceased. If in a house, note the positions of furniture and fixtures. If in an open space, the surroundings and marks of struggle or footprints. If possible, do not allow the body and surroundings to be touched till the arrival of the Procurator-Fiscal or doctor. Also carefully look for any weapon, or bottle which may have contained poison or drugs.
    Ques. Is it an offence if a farmer sets up in a field a gate which opens outwards on to the road?
    Ans. Yes. (Roads and Bridges Act, Scotland, 1878.)
    Ques. What is "Reset of Theft"?
    Ans. The crime of receiving stolen goods, knowing them to have been stolen. In England he is called a "receiver."
    [-70-]
   Ques. If a resetter received the goods through a third person, and not directly from the thief, could he be convicted?
    Ans. Yes, if he received them with a guilty knowledge. 
   Ques. Could a wife be convicted of receiving goods stolen by her husband?
    Ans. No, if she acts only to conceal his crime. (Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act, 1387.)
    Ques. What is "Stouthrief"?
    Ans. Robbery from a dwelling house by actual violence, or by using threats and menaces to the inhabitants to compel them to yield possession of their property.
   Ques. What is the distinction between "robbery" and "stouthrief"?
    Ans. The former is committed outside and the latter inside a dwelling-house.

[-71-]

FULLY-WRITTEN REPORTS.
   

1. An Attempted suicide in Thames.

   P.C .... (No.) ...... (name), reports that at .... p.m .... inst., he saw a woman run down the steps to the pier at ...... (place), and jump into the river Thames. He at once rushed down the steps, and taking off his helmet and belt, jumped in after her and succeeded in bringing her to the pier. He then took her to .......... Police Station, and charged her with attempting to commit suicide.
    She gave the name of ....., age ......., no home, a servant, and siated her reason for doing so was that she was tired of her life.

2. Building collapsed,

    P.C .... (No.) ...... (name),  reports that at  ..... p.m, ...... inst., the foundation of a new building in course of erection, in ....... (street), by Messrs ........... (name), ..................(address), builders, suddenly gave way, causing the front of building to fall No person injured. No obstruction caused, a hoarding round the building preventing the debris from falling into the road. District Surveyor of County Council and builder informed.

3. Man bitten by a dog.

    P.C .... (No.) ...... (name),  reports that at  ...... (time), ...... (date), he was called to ....... Road .........(district or town), by ........(name), of ...............(address), a .............(occupation). who informed him that a few minutes previously, whilst walking along Street, he was bitten on the left leg by a tan-coloured terrier bitch, belonging to ................(name), of ..............(address), a .............. (occupation).
   
P.C. accompanied complainant .............(name), to .............Hospital, where he was seen by the House Surgeon, who examined his leg, and stated that the skin was slightly grazed, and after dressing it allowed him to proceed home.
    P.C. subsequently saw the dog, which appeared quiet and healthy, and is not known to have bitten any person previously. The owner of-dog , has a licence for the dog, which [-72-] was shown to P.C., and bore date of  ......., 19........ issued at the General Post Office, St. Martin's-le-Grand. The dog was wearing a collar bearing owners name and address (as above).
    No expense incurred by P.C. reporting.

4. Dead Body (unknown) found.

    P.C .... (No.) ...... (name),  reports that at  ...... (time), ...... (date), whilst on duty in ........Street, he saw a man lying in the road, apparently asleep. P.C. endeavoured to arouse him, but failed to do so. He then sent P.C. (or anyone else) to call Dr .................(name) ..................(address), who attended and examined the body, certifying life to be extinct. Body removed on police ambulance (or by other means for country districts) to ................ Mortuary (or inn for country districts) ............. (address) to await inquest.
    Coroner and officer informed.
    Body searched, hut nothing found to lead to identification. Following description circulated: Age about ........, height ......... complexion ........., hair ........Dress: ........ coat and vest ....... trousers .......boots, black soft felt hat, two shirts (one Oxford, one flannel). On person, one knife and brown leather purse, containing ....... silver .......bronze, and a pawnticket for gold albert chain in the name of ..............; amount on ticket ..........; pawnbroker's name ......... ; ................. (address).

5. Window found open.

    I beg to report that at ............(time)............... (date), finding the parlour window open at ...............(address) I immediately aroused inmates, and Mr ...............(occupier) examined premises and found all correct. He stated it was left open by neglect of servant, and would secure it at once.
...............(Name).
...............(No.).

6. P.C. assaulted on duty.

    P.C ...............(No.) ............... (name), reports that at ...............(time), ...............(date) he was called to the ...............Inn, ...............(address), by ...............(name), the landlord, to eject ...............(name), who, the landlord stated, had entered his house drunk, and he had refused to serve him.
    P.C. ejected him, and when outside, the man was very disorderly, and he was compelled to take him into custody.
    [-73-] On the way to the station the prisoner was very violent, knocked P.C. into the gutter, fell upon him, and kicked him on the left leg, slightly discolouring it, and injuring his back. With the assistance of two other P.C.s ...............(Nos.)............... (names), the prisoner was conveyed to the station and charged. Dr ..............., Divisional Surgeon, was called, and certified that P.C. was suffering from injury to his back, and directed him to be placed on the "Sick List."

7. Horse suffering from glanders.

    P.C. reports that Mr...............  (name), hackney-carriage proprietor and owner of driver's badge ..............., of ...............(address), informed him that a horse belonging to him and stabled at ...............(address), was supposed to be  suffering from glanders. Two other horses are also stabled there, but as one was out at work at the time, ...............(name as above) was informed that it was not to be taken back to the stable. The Local Inspector under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act was informed and attended. He informed P.C. that the horse was in the first stage of glanders, and that he had ordered it to be slaughtered. This was afterwards done by Messrs ...............(name) ...............(address), and the carcase taken away. The stable has been properly disinfected.

8. Report of fire (with loss of life).

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports that at ............... (time),...............(date), he saw flames issuing from the ground-floor window of ...............(address). P.C. immediately blew his whistle, rang the bell and knocked at the door, but was unable to arouse the inmates. On police arriving, he sent P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), to call the fire escape from ...............(address), and to give the alarm at the alarm-post there; also P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), to the turncock ...............(name) ...............(address), and P.C ...............(No.)  ...............(name), to the station for further assistance. P.C. with P.S. ...............(No.) ...............(name), then broke open the door and succeeded in arousing the occupier ...............(name), who stated that his wife and two children were asleep in the front room on third floor. They then proceeded to that room and brought ...............(name of wife) ...............(age) ...............(name), ...............(age) ...............(name) ...............(age), safely to the ground. Mr ...............(occupier) then stated that a servant was in the back room on second floor, but the fire had then cut off all means of escape or rescue. After the fire had been got under [-74-] sufficiently to allow a search to be made, the body of the servant was found.
    Dr ..............., Divisional Surgeon, was called, and examined the body, certifying life to be extinct. Body then removed on police ambulance to ...............(mortuary) ...............(address), to await inquest.
    Coroner and officer informed.
    Body subsequently identified by ...............(name) ...............(address), who stated it was that of his daughter ...............(name) ...............(age), who had been employed as general servant at above address.
    Six steamers, two manuals, and two fire-escapes arrived promptly and commenced to play on the building, a plentiful supply of water being obtained from the ...............(name of company) main. Amount of damage at present unknown. Front rooms on ground and first floor completely burnt out, also the staircases to second and third floors, and three other rooms damaged by fire and water.
    Building insured in ...............Fire Office for £............... , and furniture in the ...............Office for ...............
    Sufficient police arrangements were made. Superintendent with ...............Inspectors ...............P.S.s and ...............P.C.s being present, and were withdrawn at ...............(time), a few being retained to protect property and preserve order.

9. Accident - Person knocked down and run over.

    P.C. reports that at ...............p.m. ...............inst., as ...............(name), age............... , of ...............(address), was crossing ...............Street, he (or she) was accidentally knocked down and run over by ...............(state vehicle, if a hackney carriage or stage carriage, plate No ...............and drivers badge No ...............). P.C. conveyed him (or her) in above cab to Hospital, where he (or she) was seen by Dr ............... , who stated he (or she) was suffering from fractured thigh, and detained him (or her) in ...............bed ...............ward.
    Witnessed by ...............(name) ...............(address), who stated there was no blame attached to driver of ...............(vehicle), he having called out to him (or her) and tried his best to draw up his horse. Friends informed by P.C. Not witnessed by P.C. reporting. Information received as above.

10. Attempted Murder.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at............... (time), ...............(dale), a man ...............(name) ............... (occupation), [-75-] residing with his wife at ...............(address), came to him while on duty in above street (or road) and informed him that on his arriving home from work he found his wife ...............(name), ...............(age), and three children, aged respectively 8, 5, and 2, lying apparently lifeless on the bed, and four small bottles labelled "Laudanum (Poison)," standing empty on a table near the bed. He at once gave each of them an emetic and sent for Dr ...............(name), of ...............(address), who quickly arrived and at once applied restoratives.
    P.C., in company of P.S ...............(No.)............... (name), or Inspector ...............(name), at once went to address given and there saw the doctor, who handed him the four empty laudanum bottles, and stated that danger had passed so far as the mother and elder children were concerned, but that the youngest was not yet out of danger, also that the woman was not fit to be moved for some time. The husband stated that the woman had been in a depressed state lately owing to the bad state of his work, but he did not think, nor had he any reason to believe, that she contemplated doing herself or children any injury.
    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), has been left at the house, and, when the woman is fit to be removed, she will be charged with attempted murder.

11. Explosion of gas.

    P.C ............... (No ) ...............(name), reports that at ...............(time)............... (date), an explosion of gas occurred at ...............(address), occupied by ...............(name).
   
The explosion took place in dining-room, caused by a servant, searching for a leakage with a lighted taper, which he placed near the ceiling, thus causing the explosion, but which did not injure him. Damage done : partition between dining and ............... room blown down, windows in each room mentioned blown out and whole house shaken, besides damage to furniture in room. The servants were in the basement of the house at the time, but beyond being shaken and frightened were not injured.
    The owner ...............(name), being out of town, a telegram was at once sent to him by housekeeper. Estimated damage and insurance unknown. Directly after the explosion the gas was turned off at meter, so no fire occurred.
    Gas authorities were at once informed, who sent workmen to the premises.
    [-76-] One Inspector, one P.S. and two P.C.s were present. 
    Fire Brigade not called.

12. Runaway Horse - Collision - Vehicle overturned.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ............... (time), ...............(date), whilst a horse attached to an open cart belonging to ...............(name) ...............(address), and driven by ...............(name) ...............(address), was standing outside the shop of ...............(name), a ...............(business), suddenly took fright from some cause unknown, and proceeded at a rapid rate along ...............(road), and when opposite ...............(place) it collided with a single-horse uncovered van belonging to ...............(name) ...............(address), and driven by ...............(name) ...............(address), whereby the former was overturned and horse thrown down on near side, the shafts were broken, and horse attached to cart slightly injured on near side foreleg. No damage to van and no personal injury.
    The driver of open cart stated that whilst he was removing the nose-bag at rear of cart the horse bolted before he was able to get hold of the reins.
    Not witnessed by P.C.

13. A man reciting in public street, completely blocking the free passage of highway.

    P.C. reports that at ...............(time) ...............(date), while on duty in ...............(street or road), he saw a large crowd assembled, completely blocking all pedestrian traffic and partly the vehicular traffic, listening to a man ...............(name) ...............(address), who was reciting ...............(mention the piece).
   
P.C. requested him to desist, as he was causing the free passage of the highway to be blocked, which he immediately did, and went away. Crowd quietly dispersed and traffic (vehicular) resumed its normal course.

14. Two men complained to P.C. that each had robbed the other, and each wished to give the other into custody.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............(time), ...............(date), while on duty in ...............(place) two men ...............(names)............... (addresses), came to him and each wished to charge the other with stealing. The former accused the latter of stealing his gold watch, and the latter accused the former of stealing a silver horseshoe pin from his tie. P.C. inquired whether they had recovered their property, and on a [-77-] reply that they had, and knowing that they were old friends and had been drinking together all day, he advised them to settle the matter in a friendly way, which they did. No breach of the peace caused.

15. Street lamp knocked down

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............(time), ............... (date), the street lamp at the corner of ...............(street), and ...............(street) was knocked down and broken by an M. S. C., No............... , driver's badge ...............(No.), belonging to ...............(name), through the near-side horse becoming restive and backing on to the lamp-post.
    P.C. at once stopped the escape of gas and informed gas authorities at ...............(address).
   
Witnessed by P.C., who attaches no blame to driver, and considers the accident unavoidable. No one injured by falling lamp-post.

16. A householder calls you in, and states that he has been robbed by one of his servants.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............(time), ...............(date), being called to ...............(address) by the householder, (name), who stated that he had been robbed of a gold ring, value ..............., by his valet ...............(name) ...............(age), and that he would charge him with stealing it. P.C. then took him to Police Station, where he was charged, and upon being searched the ring was found in his waistcoat pocket, and identified by complainant as the missing article. The charge was then read over to the prisoner, to which he made no reply.

17. A man is seen on the roof of a house at 2 am. State what steps you would take to ascertain his business there.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at 2 am. ............... inst., while on duty in ...............(place) he saw a man on the roof of ...............(No. and street). P.C. immediately rang the bell and knocked at the door, which was answered by Mrs ...............(name), who said that her husband was a great sleepwalker, and must have got up from bed and gone on to the roof, which he had done several times before. P.C. proceeded to the roof, and carefully waking the man, brought him down and handed him over to the care of his wife, who [-78-] said she would be careful not to let him get out again. Man seemed to have suffered no ill effects, and quietly returned to bed.

18. You are cal/ed to a public-house where a man is drunk amid disorderly, refuses to quit the premises, and has assaulted the landlord.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m ...............inst., he was called to the public-house ...............(place), by ...............(name), potman, to a man who was drunk and disorderly therein, who had refused to quit the premises, and had assaulted the landlord ...............(name), by striking him severely in the face with his fist. On going into the "public bar," the landlord pointed out the man who had assaulted him, and P.C. saw he was very drunk. In reply to P.C.'s inquiry, the landlord whose nose was bleeding and eye damaged, said he would accompany him to the station and charge the man. P.C. thereupon arrested him and took him to Police Station, where he was charged, but refused to give his name and address. P.C. subsequently made inquiries at the P. H. to see if the man had been served with drink while drunk, and was informed that he came into the bar in that condition, and on the landlord refusing to serve him, he had assaulted him as above.

19. A doctor calls you and complains of a man in his waiting room who is very disorderly, and refuses to be quiet or leave. He does not think the man is drunk, but rather mentally deranged.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m. ............... inst., while passing the surgery of Dr ...............(name) ...............(address) he was called by the doctor, who stated that there was a man in the waiting-room, which was rather full of people, behaving in a very disorderly manner, and that he refused to be quiet or leave the premises, also that. he did not think the man was drunk, but mentally deranged. P.C. questioned the man as to his name and address, but could obtain no intelligible reply, and while doing so a woman ...............(name), of ...............(address), came into the waiting-room and stated that the man was her husband, who had been suffering from delirium tremens, and during her temporary absence had escaped from the house. She further stated that he was quite harmless, and that she would keep [-79-] a closer guard upon him in future, and led him away home, the man going with her quite peaceably. She apologised to the doctor for the annoyance caused.

20. A man wishes to give another man into custody for threatening to murder him, or using words to that effect.

    P.C ...............(No.).............. (name), reports that at ................p.m ...............inst., while on duty in ...............(place) ...............(name), clerk, of ...............(address), came and requested P.C. to take into custody a man, name and address refused, who after begging from him with no result, threatened to murder him if he did not give him some money, and as he persisted in following and threatening him, he wished the P.C. to arrest him. As the man continued to threaten complainant in P.C.'s presence, P.C. arrested him, took him to ...............Police Station, and charged him. Mr. ............... accompanied P.C. and prisoner to the station.

21. You see a person throwing orange-peel on the footway. You have his name and address, and caution him, but after the caution he still persists in throwing it upon the footway. What action would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ............... p.m ...............inst., while on duty in ..............., he saw ...............(name), aged ............... ...............(occupation), of ...............(address), throwing orange-peel on the footway to the danger of passers by. P.C. removed the peel, cautioned him, and obtained from him his name and address, as above. Seeing that he still persisted in throwing the peel on the footway, to the danger and annoyance of pedestrians, P.C.. arrested him, and charged him at ...............Station with throwing rubbish on the public highway.
    Name and address subsequently verified by P.C. reporting.

22. You see a man washing some clothing in a Metropolitan public drinking fountain. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m. ...............inst., he saw ...............(name)............... (occupation), of ...............(address), washing an apron in the public drinking fountain, situated at corner of ...............Road and ...............Road. P.C. at once told him to desist, and cautioned him not to repeat the [-80-] offence, to which he replied: "I did not know I was not allowed to do it." The man being well known to P.C., his address was not verified. The matter duly reported, and Metropolitan Drinking Fountain Association communicated with.
   23. You see a licensed hawker hawking paraffin, and you are doubtful whether he is authorised to hawk same. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m., ............... inst, he saw ...............(name), licensed hawker, of ...............(address), hawking paraffin on a barrow, the latter holding about twelve gallons. Being doubtful whether he was authorised to hawk paraffin, P.C. requested him to produce his licence enabling him to do so, which he did. It was issued to him by the Local Authority on ...............(date), No ...............
    Another way to deal with this case would be as follows:
    Being doubtful whether he was authorised to hawk paraffin, P.C. requested him to produce his licence enabling him to do so. He produced an ordinary hawker's licence of recent date, and on P.C. telling him that he would be reported for a summons for hawking paraffin without the permission of the Local Authority, he replied : "I was not aware that I had to obtain such permission, and thought that my hawker's licence would do."

24. You hear shots proceeding from a barge moored close to the bank of a canal. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m., ...............inst., while on duty in ............... Road, he heard shots proceeding from the Canal, and on going there he saw ...............(name), of ...............(address), on a barge which was moored close to the bank, with a revolver in his hand, and which had evidently just been discharged. On being spoken to by P.C., he stated that he was in charge of the barge, and was in the habit of carrying the revolver, and had been amusing himself by firing a few shots into the water. He produced the licence for the revolver granted by the Inland Revenue Authorities, dated January 3rd, 19..., and issued at ...............Post Office.

[-81-]  25. As you are passing a suburban house one night, you notice certain indications which cause you to suspect that someone has recently entered, or has attempted to enter, the premises. The house has been left under special police protection during the temporary absence of occupier.

    P.C ...............(No.) (name), reports that at ...............p.m., ...............inst., on examining the premises of ...............(name), stockbroker ...............(address), which had been left by the occupier under special police protection, he saw that the mark which he had placed in door on going on beat had been disturbed, indicating that some person had recently entered, or attempted to enter. P.C. obtained the assistance of P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), from adjoining beat, and placing him at rear of premises, rang the front door bell, which was immediately answered by the occupier, as above, whom P.C. knew, and who stated that he had been hurriedly summoned to town, owing to pressing business matters, and had not had sufficient time to acquaint Police of his return. Matter duly reported by P.C.

26. A man comes to you and wishes to give into your custody another man who, he alleges, has assaulted him. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports that at ...............p.m., ............... inst., whilst on duty in ...............Road ...............(name), carpenter, of ...............(address), wished to give ...............(name), tailor, of ...............Street, into custody for assaulting him. P.C. not seeing any marks of violence on the complainant, nor having seen the assault committed, told him he could not interfere in the matter, and referred him to the magistrate for a summons.

27. You see a man drunk while in charge of a horse and mail van, containing letters, the property of the Postmaster-General. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at ...............p.m., ...............inst., he saw ...............(name), of ...............(address), in charge of a horse and mail van, No ..............., containing letters, etc., the property of the Postmaster-General, proceeding eastward along ...............Road. Seeing that he swayed on his seat, apparently through drink, P.C. stopped the horse and requested him to get down, which he did, and was then found to be so drunk as to be almost incapable of standing. [-82-] P.C. then took him to the ...............Station and charged him with being drunk while in charge of a horse and van, the latter being led to station by P.C ...............(No.)............... (name).
   
Postal Authorities at ...............Post Office informed by P.C. reporting and Postmaster ...............(name) , speedily attended Station with another driver, who took charge of horse and van, and the former signed the Property Book after satisfying himself that all was correct.

28. You are called by the officer in charge of a Salvation Army hall to a man who is disturbing the service, and who on being spoken to by the officer, had kicked him on the leg What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports that at............... p.m.,...............inst., he was called to the Salvation Army Hall ...............(place), by ...............(name), Captain, to assist him in ejecting ...............(name), painter, of ...............(address), who was well known to complainant, and who was disturbing the service by shouting out at intervals, and jeering at the several officers. Also, when asked by to desist and leave the building, he had assaulted him by kicking him on the leg.
    On P.C.s arrival the man left the building, and as the assault was of a trivial nature, and complainant would not charge him, P.C. exchanged names and addresses and referred him to a magistrate. The man went quietly away.

29. Whilst on fixed-point duty you witness a collision on the River Thames at ...............Pier between two pleasure steamers, whereby many persons are thrown into the water, some of whom are drowned and others seriously injured. What steps would you take ?

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports that at ...............p.m.,............... inst, whilst on fixed-point duty on ...............Bridge, he saw two pleasure steamers, viz. ...............(name), and  ...............(name), belonging to the ...............Company, approaching ...............Pier together from opposite directions, and while the former was discharging her passengers, the latter collided with her, causing several persons to be thrown into the water.
    P.C. immediately blew his whistle to attract the attention of Inspector ..............., in charge of steam launch ............... (name), which had just passed under the bridge, who promptly put about and succeeded in rescuing several persons who had been thrown into the water.
    In the meantime, P C ...............(No.)............... (name), who came in response to whistle being blown, was sent to ...............[-83-] Station to inform officer on duty, who speedily arrived with further help, and on the rescued people being landed from ...............(name, as above), the following ...............(name), aged ..............., clerk, of ...............(address) ...............(name), carpenter, aged ..............., same address ; ...............(name), coachman, aged ..............., of ...............(address) ; and ...............(name), chemist, aged ..............., of ...............(address), were taken in four-wheeled cabs, Plate Nos ..............., ...............,Badge Nos ...............and ..............., to ...............Hospital, where they were examined by Dr. ..............., House Surgeon, who stated they were all suffering from internal injuries. etc., through being crushed between the steamers, and detained them in ...............Ward, beds ..............., ...............,..............., also ...............(name), actor of ...............(address); ...............(name), plumber, age ..............., of ............... (address) ; ..............., milliner, age ...............of ...............(address), who had been rescued and were unconscious, were attended to by Dr ..............., Divisional Surgeon, and although artificial respiration was resorted to for some time, the two latter succumbed, and death being pronounced by Divisional Surgeon, their bodies were conveyed on ambulances by P.C.s ...............(Nos.)............... (names), to ...............Mortuary to await inquest. The two former soon recovered, and Dr ...............allowed them to he taken home in four-wheeled cabs, Plate Nos ...............and ..............., Badge Nos ...............and ..............., by P.C.s ...............(No.s.) ...............(names).
   
The launch ...............(name), in the hope of seeing more bodies, remained in the vicinity for one hour, but none were found.
    Coroner and his officer informed by P.C. reporting.
    Postal telegram sent to Lloyd's.
    The steamers both disembarked their passengers, and were taken to their moorings in mid-stream. Damage to each was only slight.
    Witnesses of collision : Pier Master ...............Commander ......, R.N., and P.C. reporting; the two former stating that they considered it a pure accident, the strong tide then running causing it.
    Friends of injured and dead (the latter obtained from addresses on persons) informed by wire, who subsequently came and identified the latter (as above). Manager of Steam-boat Company ...............(address), also informed by wire.
    No expenses incurred by police, the same being paid by the manager of Steam-boat Company.
    Police present : ...............Inspectors ...............P.S.s............... P.C.s total............... , who were withdrawn at ...............p.m.

[-84-] 30. You see a crowd collected, and on going there a costermonger wishes you to take a man, whom he is holding by the collar, into custody for stealing his pony, barrow, and load of vegetables from outside the public-house, while he was inside drinking with a friend. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports that at  ...............p.m  ...............inst., he saw a crowd of persons collected opposite  ...............(address), and on going there to ascertain the cause saw  ...............(name), costermonger, of  ...............(address), holding a man by the collar. He stated that a short time previously he left his pony, barrow, and a load of vegetables outside the  ...............public-house  ...............Road, while he was inside drinking with a friend, and when he came out he saw the man driving the pony, etc., away as fast as he could, and he had pursued and overtaken him in a cab, and now wished to give him into custody for stealing them.
    The accused made no reply to the charge, and on being taken into custody by P.C., the crowd quietly dispersed. At  ...............Station he gave the name of  ...............(name)  ...............(address), and was charged by with stealing the pony, barrow, and vegetables.

31. A shopkeeper complains to you of goods which are placed for sale outside his shop being stolen occasionally, and that he has just missed two zinc pails from there. What steps would you take?

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports that at  ...............p.m  ............... inst.,   ............... (name), oilman   ...............(address), complained to him of having on different occasions had goods which were exposed for sale outside his shop stolen, and that he had just missed two zinc pails from there.
    P C. asked him whether he had complained at station or to police before, and on finding he had not, and after making inquiries to discover the thief P.C. informed him he would report the matter so that observation could be kept on the premises, and entered particulars in   ...............Book, page   ...............

32. You are called to a horse which has fallen dawn in the street, and is evidently in great Pain. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............p.m.,   ...............inst, he was called by   ...............(name), potman, of   ...............(address), who stated that as   ...............(name), carman, of   .............. [-85-] .(address), was driving a horse attached to a covered van, belonging to the   ...............Railway along , and when opposite it suddenly fell down, evidently in great pain, and they could not get it up.
    P.C. at once proceeded to the spot, and seeing the horse appeared to be in great pain, he advised   ...............(name) to call  ............... (name), veterinary surgeon, of   ...............Street, who promptly attended, and, after examination, stated the horse was suffering from "gripes," and administered a draught. The animal soon recovered sufficiently to be led gently to stables by carman, the van being subsequently removed by   ...............(name) with another horse.
    Traffic slightly obstructed, and was regulated by P.C. reporting. No expenses incurred by police, veterinary surgeon's fee being paid by railway company.

33. While you are on point duty a middle-aged lady rushes up to you in a state of great excitement, and addresses you in a foreign language, which you do not understand, at the same time pointing down the street. Write a report of what subsequently occurred, amid the steps you took in the matter.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............am.   ...............inst., while on point duty at   ...............(place), a middle-aged lady rushed up to him in a state of great excitement, and, speaking in a foreign language, pointed down   ...............Street. Not understanding her language, P.C. looked in the direction pointed out, and saw two well dressed men slowly walking down that thoroughfare away from the point where P.C. was posted, and evidently on the look-out for someone. Turning round, and seeing the woman talking to P.C., they quickly came up, and one of them   ...............(name)   ...............(nationality), who could speak English, explained that the woman was his wife, for whom they were looking, they having been separated in the crowd in Street. The woman appeared greatly relieved at finding her husband and friend.

34. A pawnbroker calls you to take into custody a man whom he has detained, and who has attempted to pawn a hunting-watch, which has been stolen. The man refuses to give any information respecting same. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............am.,   ............... inst., he was called by   ...............(name), pawnbroker, of [-86-]   ...............(address), to take into custody a man who had attempted to pawn a gold hunting watch. No   ..............., which had been circulated in Informations, and on Pawnbrokers' List, as stolen on the   ...............inst. in   ...............Division.
    P.C. questioned the man as to how he became possessed of the same, but he refused to give any information whatever respecting it. P.C. thereupon took him into custody and charged him at   ...............Station with having stolen property in his possession and refusing to account for same. Mr.  ............... (as above) attended station and signed charge-sheet as a witness.

35. You see a crowd assembled, and on going there you see a Chinese being roughly pushed about. At the same time a man whom you know well requests you to take the foreigner into custody for severely assaulting his boy, who is bleeding from the head. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p.m   ...............inst., he saw a crowd assembled in   ...............Road, and on going there, saw a Chinese being roughly pushed about. On making inquiries   ...............(name)   ...............(occupation), of   ...............Street, stated that the Chinese had severely assaulted his son   ...............(name), aged   ............... (who was standing by, and bleeding profusely from a wound in the head), with a walking-stick, which he carried in his hand.
    On complainant's request, P.C. took the foreigner into custody, and charged him at   ...............Station with assault. Prisoner gave his name and address as   ...............(name), of   ...............(No.)   ...............(address).   ............... (name as above) attended station and signed charge-sheet, his son's head being dressed by Divisional Surgeon

36. A barber wishes you to take into custody a man, not an ordinary customer, who is drunk, and has taken up one of the razors, and is flourishing it in the shop to the alarm of other customers.

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............p.m.,   ...............inst., he was called by   ...............(name)   ...............(occupation),   ...............(address), to a man who had entered his shop in a drunken condition, seized one of the razors, and was flourishing it to the alarm of the other customers.
    [-87-] On P.C. entering the shop, the man, who gave the name and address of   ...............(name)   ...............(age)  ............... (address), dropped the razor and left the premises at request of complainant. When outside he went quietly away, and slight crowd dispersed. Name and address handed to   ...............(complainant), for further action by summons, if necessary.

37. A bicyclist collides with a hansom cab in a main thoroughfare, whereby cyclist is killed, machine damaged, and horse of cab injured. State fully steps taken.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p.m.,   ...............inst., a collision occurred at the side of Bridge, between a bicycle, owned and ridden by   ...............(name), aged   ...............of   ...............(address), and a H.C., plate No.  ............... , driver's badge   ..............., proprietor   ...............(name)  ............... (address), whereby the cyclist   ...............(name), was thrown into the roadway and rendered unconscious, and the horse of H.C. thrown down and cut about the knees. P.C. conveyed the injured man in H.C., plate No   ..............., driver's badge   ...............to St Hospital, where he was seen by Dr   ...............house surgeon, who stated that life was extinct, and ordered body to be conveyed to the hospital mortuary to await an inquest.
    In the meantime P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), whom P.C. reporting had left in charge, had called Mr   ............... veterinary surgeon, who lived opposite, to examine the horse, and who stated that it had received a slight cut on each foreleg, and that it might take the cab home to stables without cruelty, which was done by driver.
    The bicycle, which was severely damaged, was removed to Station by P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), and removed by deceased's brother at   ...............p.m.
    The traffic was diverted by P.C.s   ...............(No's.)   ...............(names), into adjoining streets, and resumed its ordinary course at   ...............p.m.
    Friends of deceased informed by P.C. reporting. Names and addresses obtained from pocket-book found on deceased. Friends subsequently attended mortuary and identified the body. Veterinary surgeon's fee paid by H.C. proprietor.
    Not witnessed by P.C. reporting, but by   ...............(name),   ...............(occupation)   ...............(address), who stated that in his opinion the deceased was to blame in trying to cross the horse's head.

[-88-]

38. The superintendent of a public swimming bath requests you to take into custody a young labouring man for disorderly conduct in the bath and annoying the other bathers. He has requested him to leave, but he stoutly refuses to do so. What steps would you take?

   P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at noon   ...............inst., he was called by  ............... (name), superintendent of the Swimming Baths, to take into custody a young labouring man who was disorderly in the baths, annoying the other bathers, and who on being requested by him to leave the bath, had stoutly refused to do so.
    P.C. entered the baths, and the man, seeing P.C. and again being told to leave the bath by superintendent, did so, but while leaving stated that although he had paid his money for a swim, he could not obtain either towels or bathing drawers, and the boxes were all filled. This the superintendent denied. P C. thereupon exchanged names and addresses and as the man went quietly away, referred complainant to the magistrate for a summons, if necessary.

39. The man in charge of a cabmen's shelter calls you to a cabman (not at work) who is inside, drunk and using abusive language, and who refuses to leave when requested. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p m.   ...............inst., he was called by (name), the man in charge of the cabmen's shelter, in   ...............Street, to   ................ (name), H.C. driver, badge   ..............., who was not at work that day, but was inside, drunk and using abusive language to him, and refused to leave the shelter when requested by him to do so. P.C. told   ...............that he had better eject him, but on   ...............seeing P.C., he, with persuasion, quietly left the shelter and went away, thus giving P.C. no cause for interference.

40. The water-main at a busy thoroughfare bursts. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p. m.   ...............inst., the main of the   ...............Water Company burst in the   ...............Road, opposite   ...............Street, tearing up a considerable portion of the roadway and completely blocking both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. P.C. at once sent P.C   ...............(No.)   ............... (name), from adjoining beat to inform the turncock   ...............(name)   ...............(address), and also to inform inspector on duty at   ...............Street, and in the meantime assisted by P.C.s [-89-]   ...............(Nos.)  ............... (names), who were going on duty, directed the traffic, that going north by way of   ...............Street, and that south by way of   ...............Road. On the arrival of turncock he promptly turned off water at main, and wired to Company's official for gang of men to repair damage, who arrived at   ...............p.m., and at   ...............p.m. had sufficiently repaired roadway to allow the traffic to resume its ordinary course. Parish authorities informed, by P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name). Police present   ...............P.S. and   ...............P.C.s, who were withdrawn at   ...............p.m.

41. Man knocked down by hansom cab and severely injured.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p.m.   ...............inst., as   ...............(name), age   ...............coal porter, of   ...............(address), was crossing   ...............Road, at the corner of   ............... Road, he was knocked down by H C   ..............., driver's badge unknown at present, the shaft striking him on the left side. P.C. conveyed him in H.C   ..............., badge   ..............., to   ...............Hospital, where he was examined by Dr   ..............., house surgeon, who stated that one of the injured man's ribs was fractured, but allowed him to go home after attending to same. Witnessed by   ...............(name), and his wife   ...............(name)   ...............(address), who both stated that H.C. driver was to blame, he not having called out to   ..............., or attempted to pull up when the danger was at hand, but drove away. Public Carriage Office informed with a view to ascertaining name and address of owner of H.C., and thereby that of the driver, so that proceedings can be taken against the latter. Not witnessed by P.C. reporting   ...............cab hire expense.

42. On your beat you find the door of a shop insecurely fastened and on looking in the passage you see some bundles tied up. As no one lived an the premises, what steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............p.m.,   ...............inst, while on duty in   ..............., he found the door of a shop, owned by   ...............(name)   ...............manufacturers   ...............(address), insecurely fastened, and on looking into the passage, found four parcels wrapped in brown paper and securely fastened with cord therein, apparently ready for removal. While doing this, Mr   ..............., manager, came out from a back office and stated that they were goods belonging to the firm, placed there ready for early delivery in the morning, that all was correct, and thanked P.C. for the attention paid to the premises.

[-90-]

43. A gentleman complains to you of rude and indecent words being chalked on the outside of his premises, by children from a neighbouring street. Having before complained to the police of similar nuisance, with no effect, he now wishes strong measures to be taken. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ............... a.m.   ...............inst., a gentleman   ...............(name)   ...............(occupation)   ...............(address), complained of great annoyance caused by children from   ...............Street (adjoining) chalking rude and indecent words on the outside of his walls and shutters ; and also stated that having before complained of similar nuisance, he now wished strong measures to be taken to prevent a recurrence.
    P.C. at once obliterated the words complained of, and informed complainant that he would duly report the matter so that it should be read out to each relief; and in the meantime he would keep strict observation to detect the offenders.

44. A serious fire occurs, with loss of life and complete stoppage of both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. Report fully what steps you would take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............pm,   ...............inst., a fire broke out on first floor of Messrs   ...............(name)   ...............(occupation), Parish of St   ...............(address), with loss of life and complete stoppage of both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. On discovering the fire P.C. at once blew his whistle, pulled the fire alarm close by, and rang the bells and private fire-alarm belonging to the firm. Further police assistance arriving, P.C. reporting sent P.C   ...............(No),  ............... (name), for turncock   ............... (address),  and P.C.  ............... (No.)  ............... (name), to the station to inform inspector on duty. Messrs   ...............'s private fire brigade was immediately set to work, and, by the aid of their fire escapes and assistance of police, the inmates were rescued, except   ...............(name)  ............... (age)   ...............(occupation), and   ...............(name),   ...............(age)  ............... (occupation), who were burnt to death while endeavouring to make good their escape by means of the staircase.
    In the meantime the first engine and escape arrived together, at   ...............p.m., in charge of Chief Engineer   ...............(name), others following very speedily, and by their united efforts the fire was confined to the first and second floors, and extinguished at   ...............a.m. 
    [-91-] Shells were procured and bodies of dead persons (as above) conveyed to the parochial mortuary by fire brigade. Friends of deceased and coroner informed by P.C. reporting.
    Pedestrian and vehicular traffic were diverted, that going north by way of   ...............Street, and south by way of   ...............Street by P.C. stationed there. Damage to premises the whole of stock, comprising mantles, dresses, etc., stored on ground and first floors, and contents of second floor, used as work-rooms, by fire and water. A plentiful supply of water was obtained from the   ...............Company's mains.
    Premises and part of stock insured in the   ...............Co. Amount and cause of fire at present unknown.
    Police present   ...............superintendent   ...............inspectors   ...............P.S.s and   ...............P.C.s, who were withdrawn at   ...............a.m.
    No expenses incurred by police, or any further personal injury.
    ............... (name), owner, informed at private address by wire at  ............... p.m.

45. Collision between a hansom cab and a light sprung cart, throwing driver of latter into the mood and injuring him; also causing such injury to the horse attached to the latter as to necessitate its being slaughtered.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............am.,   ...............inst., a collision occurred at the junction of   ............... Road and   ...............Road , between H.C.   ............... driver's badge   ..............., owned by   ...............(name)   ...............(address), and a light spring cart, owned and driven by   ...............(name),   ...............aged , of    ...............(address), whereby both shafts of cart and off fore-leg of horse attached to same were broken, and the driver thrown into the road and rendered insensible.
    P.C., without delay, had him conveyed to   ...............Hospital on police ambulance by P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), where he was seen by Dr   ..............., house surgeon, who certified that he was suffering from concussion of the brain, and detained him in No   ...............bed   ...............Ward.
    In the meantime, Mr   ..............., veterinary surgeon   ...............(address), had been informed by P.C   ...............(No)   ...............(name), who promptly attended, examined horse, and after filling in the necessary form, ordered the horse to be slaughtered, which was speedily done by   ...............(name), licensed slaughterman, of   ...............(address), and carcase was removed [-92-] at   ...............p.m., by Messrs   ...............(name)   ...............(address). The cart was subsequently removed into the premises of Messrs   ..............., wheelwrights, close by. Friends of injured man and proprietor of H.C. informed by police.
    Slight obstruction caused to traffic, which was regulated by P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name). Not vitnessed by P.C. reporting. No other damage or personal injury. Expenses incurred   ...............Veterinary Surgeon and   ...............slaughterman's fee, which were paid by wife of injured man, who stated that she was quite satisfied with steps taken by police.

46. A cabman calls you to a man who has committed wilful damage to his cab to the amount of    ............... and who refuses his name and address. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No..)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p.m.   ...............inst , he was called by H.C. driver, badge  ............... , plate number   ..............., to a man who while a fare and being driven from   ...............Station to   ...............(place), had committed wilful damage amounting to about , by cutting the cushions and panels of the cab, and who on being asked for his name and address, refused to give it. P.C. requested the man for his name and address, but he refused it, and was then taken into custody, but on arrival at station he handed his card to the inspector on duty, who detained him while name and address was verified, and proprietor of H.C. informed, which was done by P.C. reporting, and found to be correct. Name and address was then handed to the proprietor and cabman for them to proceed by summons
    Public Carriage Department form duly filled in.

47. You see the outside wall of a house bulging out into the street in a dangerous manner. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............p.m.,  ...............inst, he saw the outside wall of   ...............(address), (unoccupied house), bulging outwards into the street in a dangerous manner, and at once, with the assistance of P.C.s   ...............and   ...............(No.s.)   ...............(names), who were passing, warned pedestrians from approaching near the bulging wall, and had the vehicular traffic diverted by way of   ...............Road and   ...............Road respectively. In the meantime, the District Surveyor and owner   ..............., builder   ............... [-93-]   ...............Road, having been summoned by P.C   ...............(above), arrived, and the former gave orders for the walls to be shored up, which was subsequently done by owner and men to the surveyor's satisfaction. L.C.C. informed by wire, and no expenses incurred.

48. Information is given you that at a certain house there are a number of valuable stolen dogs. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name),  ............... reports that at   ...............a.m.,   ...............inst., he was informed by   ...............(name)   ...............(occupation)   ...............(address), that   ...............(name)   ...............(address), who had only recently come out of prison, had a number of valuable stolen dogs in an outhouse at rear of latter house, which informant could partly see, but not sufficiently to enable him to give description of dogs   ...............(name) also stated that his reason for believing them to be stolen was that several persons in the neighbourhood had lost their dogs, and that he knew the accused to be a receiver of stolen property.
    P.C. directed P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), to remain in vicinity to see if any dogs were removed, and then with informant proceeded to police station, and subsequently to police court adjoining, where a sworn information was laid and a search warrant was granted by the presiding magistrate, which was executed by Sub-Divisional Inspector   ...............and in the outhouse described valuable dogs were found.   ...............(name) was arrested and charged with having them unlawfully in his possession, but made no answer to the charge. The dogs (of various breeds) were taken to the station, and "Informations" searched, when it was found that several answering descriptions of dogs found in possession of prisoner had been reported as stolen. Owners were promptly informed, who attended station each identified his animal, and signed charge-sheet before taking same away. 

49. An entertainment is taking place in a mission-room, and you see the people pay for admission at the door. What steps would you take?

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name) reports that at   ...............p.m.   ...............inst., while on duty in   ...............Street   ...............(parish), he saw a number of persons going in the mission room belonging to St.   ................   ............... Road where an entertainment [-94-] (magic-lantern) was announced to be held at p.m.  ............... P.C. also saw some of the persons pay for admission to   ...............(name), honorary secretary, some sixpence and some threepence. each. On P.C. calling his attention to this, the hon. sec. stated that the proceeds were to be given to the poor of the parish in the shape of coal, blankets, etc., and he was not aware they were violating the law in doing so. P.C. then informed him that there was no occasion for police interference, the audience being orderly and quiet.

50. You have reason to believe that a burglar is in a house on your beat, and while endeavouring to escape, he slips and breaks his leg. State fully what steps you took to erect his capture, and the subsequent steps you also look in the matter.

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports that at   ...............a.m.  ............... inst., while passing   ...............(address) he saw a light moving on the second floor, and suspecting something was wrong, quickly obtained the assistance of P.C.s   ...............(Nos.)   ...............(names), by flashing his lamp. Having surrounded the house, P.C. rang the front-door bell, which was answered by Mr   ..............., the occupier, and together we searched the house. On reaching the second floor back we heard a thud in the backyard below, as of a body having fallen from a height, and on proceeding there the P.C. found a man (name and address refused) lying, and on examination found he had broken his left leg. P.C. sent P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name) to the station for ambulance, and in the meantime improvised splints and bandages, and rendered "first aid." On arrival of ambulance, P.C. conveyed the injured man to   ...............Hospital, where he was seen by Dr   ..............., house surgeon, and placed in No  ............... bed   ...............Ward. Having obtained the house surgeon's permission, P.C. left P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), to watch the man, while he informed the officer on duty at Police Station. In the meantime the house had been thoroughly searched by P.S   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), and P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), and it was found that the man had entered the house by means of a false key, and that no property was missing, the man evidently having been disturbed. Description circulated in " Informations." Police will watch the man till he is well enough to be taken to station and charged.

FOR P.S. TO INSPECTOR.

51. While you are in charge of a suburban station the clergyman of the parish asks your assistance to restrain two or three persons from gathering in his church porch, and talking loudly. He has requested them to leave, but they refuse, and disturb the services. As your reserve man has been called out and you are alone, what steps would you take?

    I beg to report that at   ...............am   ...............inst, the Reverend   ...............(name), Vicar of   ...............(address), called at this station and requested my assistance to restrain two or three persons from gathering in his church porch and talking loudly upon the present crisis of the Church. He added that he had already requested them to leave, but they had refused, and in consequence the services were disturbed. As the P.C. on reserve had been called out I called P.C   ...............(No.), who was in bed in the section-house, and left him in charge of the station wvhilst I went round with the clergyman to the church, where I found   ...............(name) of   ...............(address),   ...............(name), of   ...............(address), and   ...............(name), of   ...............(address), who stated they had no desire to create a disturbance, but were simply protesting as Churchmen against the use of incense in the church. I told them that if they had any complaints to make against his reverence's ritual they should have written to his bishop or applied to the Consistory Court, now sitting, which they said they would do, and left the church. I handed the reverend gentleman the names and addresses of the offenders and referred him to a magistrate. No police evidence Absent from station minutes, viz, from   ...............to   ...............am.
   
                 (Name)   ..............., P.S.

FOR P.S. to INSPECTOR.

52. A block occurs in the traffic of a principal thoroughfare; horses are injured, and several carriages damaged. Report fully what steps you would take.

    P.S   ...............(No)   ...............(name), reports that at   ...............pm   ...............inst., a collision occurred in  ............... (place), outside   ...............(place), between a pair-horse brougham, owned by   ...............(name)   ...............( address), driven by   ...............(name),   ...............(address), and a pair-horse victoria, owned by   ...............(name)   ...............(address), driven by   ...............(name) [-96-]   ............... (address), thereby causing a block to the traffic. Carriages empty at the time.
    PS. at once posted P.C   ...............(No ),   ...............(name), at Street, to divert traffic going west, and P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), at   ...............Street, to divert traffic going east, also sent to station to inform officer on duty. In the meantime, Mr.   ..............., veterinary surgeon, of Street, seeing the block, had come up, and on request of PS. examined the horses, and ordered them to be led to his address, close by, as they were each cut about the head and legs, and after dressing same, stated they could be taken home without causing cruelty, which was done by their respective drivers.
    Damage: Both off-side wheels of brougham broken off at axle, framework and glass also scratched and broken the off-side back wheel of victoria broken off at axle, framework and glass scratched and broken.
    Not witnessed by police ; information from the coachmen.
    No expense incurred by police, owner of victoria paying the veterinary surgeon's fee. Carriages removed into   ...............Street (side-street)   ...............pm., and traffic resumed its ordinary course. Carriages subsequently removed from side-street at   ...............p.m. by owners.

SPECIMEN SUMMONSES.

1. Riding a Bicycle on the Footpath.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name)  reports   ...............(name)   ............... (occupation), of   ...............(address), for riding a bicycle on the footway in   ...............(street or road), Parish of   ...............(name), to the common danger of foot passengers at   ...............(p.m.)   ...............inst. 
    In this case, P.C. saw   ...............(name as above), riding the bicycle on the footway for a distance of about   ...............yards, and stopping him, told him he would be reported for a summons, to which he replied, "I don't care."

2. Wilful misbehaviour of driver of M.S.C., or H.C.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports. Fred Brown, badge 796, driver of M.S.C. (or H.C.), plate No. 8614, for wilful misbehaviour while in charge of his vehicle, in   ............... Street, Borough of   ............... at   ...............p.m.
    In this case, P.C. saw Brown, who had evidently been quarrelling with a Midland Railway van driver, van No. 84, proceeding in the same direction, and when opposite Street, deliberately drive his vehicle across the heads of the horses attached to the van, thereby forcing them upon the [-97-] pavement, and causing great danger and alarm to pedestrians, and endangering the lives of the passengers on his M.S.C.
    Witnesses. {George Spencer, M.Ry., van driver. {Jas. Harvey   ...............(addresses).

3. Summons for causing obstruction.

    P.C   ...............(No.)   ...............(name), reports   ...............(name) grocer, etc, of   ...............(address), Boroumgh of   ..............., for allowing goods to rest on the footway for a longer time than is absolutely necessary for the loading or unloading such goods, thereby causing obstruction or annoyance to the passage of the public. (Contrary to 30 and 31 Vic., C. 134, S. 6.)
    In this case P.C. saw two crates resting on the footway, which is rather narrow, from 10.30 to 11.25 am., 28th inst., and nearly blocking the footway.
    Having called his attention previously to it, with no effect, P.C. thereupon told him he would be reported for a summons, to which he replied, "I can't help it. I've been so busy."
    4 Unloading coal during prohibited hours within the Special Limits.

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports   ...............(name), carman, of   ...............(address), employed by Messrs   ............... coal merchants, for that he between the hours of 10 a.m, and 6 p.m did unload coal on the footway within the Special Limits of the Metropolitan Streets Act, at 11.15 a.m.   ............... inst. at   ...............(name of place), Parish of   ............... contrary to 30 and 31 Vic., C. 134, S. 15.
    In this case P.C. saw   ...............(name), as above, unloading the coal at   ...............(name or No. of house)   .............. (occupation, if known)   ............... (address), and on telling him he would be reported for a summons for doing so, he replied, "I can't help it. My governor sent me to do it, as we are so busy."

5. Landlord allowing betting in public-house.

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports   ...............(name of landlord), licencee of the "Rising Sun" public-house  ...............(address), for suffering his said house to be used for the purpose of betting with persons resorting thereto on  ...............(date), contrary to 16 and 17 Vic., C. 119.
    In this case, at 10.30 am.  ...............(date), P.C., while in plain clothes, saw  ...............(name of landlord), standing in front of [-98-] the saloon bar, with some well known bookmakers and betting men, and saw slips of paper pass from one to the other of the men. Also saw two men enter the same bar and hand slips of paper and money to a bookmaker, to whom the landlord was talking at the time, and heard each say, "Put that on for me."
    P.C. also overheard part of the conversation between landlord and bookmaker, which related to betting on a horse race, which was shortly to take place, and further saw the landlord hand a half-sovereign to the other, saying, " Back the winner for me."
    Witnesses  ...............(names)  ............... (occupations)  ...............(addresses).

6. "Calling out Newspapers."

    P.C   ...............(No.)  ............... (name), reports   ...............(name) ...............(age) ...............(address), for calling out newspapers for the purpose of sale at ...............(time, date), to the annoyance of the inhabitants at ...............(place), contrary to L.C.C. By-Law, made 6/2/00.
    In this case P.C. heard ...............(name), as above, calling out Echo, Star, etc., and cautioned him, and shortly afterwards Mrs ...............(name) ...............(address), requested me to stop him calling out, as it seriously disturbed and annoyed her husband, who was ill in bed.
    On being told by P.C. that he would be reported for a summons, he made no reply and went away.

7. No name on van.

    P.C ...............(No.) ...............(name), reports ...............(name), of ...............(address), for using a four-wheeled covered van, of which he is the owner, without having painted on the off-side, or off-side shaft thereof, his christian name and surname, and the place of his trade or abode, at 2.30 p.m. ...............(date), at ...............(street), Parish of ...............(name), contrary to 5 and 6 Will. IV., c. 50, s. 76.
    In this case, P.C. saw the van, drawn by one horse, and driven by ...............(name), as above, proceeding along ...............(street) at a walking pace, and in carelessly turning the corner of ...............(street), nearly knocked down an old lady who was standing on the kerb waiting to cross. P.C. cautioned him about his careless driving, and at the same time noticed that no name and address was on the off-side shaft, or in fact on any part of the vehicle, and called his attention to it, to which [-99-] he replied in an abusive manner. P.C. thereupon told him he should report him for a summons.

8. Van standing longer than necessary for loading or unloading.

    P.C ...............(No.)............... (name), reports ...............(name), ...............(carman), of ...............(address), for causing a pair-horse uncovered van to stand longer than necessary for loading or unloading, viz., from ...............(time) to ...............(time),............... (date), at ...............(street), Parish of ..............., contrary to 2 and 3 Vic., C. 47, S. 54.
    In this case P.C. saw the van, laden with sacks of potatoes, standing outside ...............(place), from ...............(time) till
...............(time), the van guard being asleep on top of the load. P.C. awoke him and asked him where the carman was, and the boy replied, "In the market." On the carman subsequently returning, P.C. told him he should report him for a summons, as he had twice cautioned before, to which he replied, "I can't help it; they won't let me unload yet, as they haven't got room in the shop for the potatoes yet."

Particulars of a Boiler Explosion required by The Board of Trade.

1. Name of premises or works on which explosion occurred.
2. Postal address.
3. Exact time and date of explosion.
4. Number of persons killed and injured.
5. General description of boiler.
6. Purpose for which the boiler was used.
7. Part of boiler which failed, and the extent of failure generally.
8. Pressure at which boiler was worked.
9. Name and address of any society or association by whom the boiler was last examined or insured.
10. Signature of person responsible for the accuracy of the particulars contained in this form.
    Address ..............., date...............