Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - The "Worcester" Training Ship

The Worcester Training Ship - photograph

THE "WORCESTER" TRAINING SHIP

To those who know the lower reaches and the estuary of the Thames, the old men-of-war at anchor here and there, now in use as training ships, are familiar objects. The Worcester, a two-decker of 4,725 tons, formerly the Frederick William, at present lies moored off Greenhithe, and has been lent to the Thames Marine Officer's Training Ship Society. Boys are educated on this vessel for a seafaring career at a cost of from forty-five to fifty guineas a year, and the Board of Trade allows two years spent on her to count as one year's sea-service. The Admiralty also favours the ship by nominating some of the boys to cadetships in the Royal Naval Reserve, and her Majesty gives prizes for competition.

source: The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896