Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - Newgate Prison : The "Graveyard," looking towards the door leading to The Old Bailey

Newgate Prison - photograph

NEWGATE PRISON : THE "GRAVEYARD," LOOKING TOWARDS THE DOOR LEADING TO THE OLD BAILEY

Only murderers whose crimes have been committed in the Metropolis area north of the Thames are executed at Newgate, whither they are removed after sentence in the adjoining Sessions House. Transpontine murderers are hanged at Wandsworth Gaol, unless otherwise ordered by the authorities. The "graveyard" at Newgate Prison is, as our picture shows, a very grim-looking burial place, which primarily serves the purpose of a passage from the gaol to the Old Bailey. Those who within the precincts of the prison have paid the extreme penalty of the law are buried under the flagstones, lime being enclosed in the coffins. On the walls on either side are the initial letters of the murderers' surnames, and by this means the places of burial are recorded, though neither dates nor names are now added.