Victorian London - Directories - Dickens's Dictionary of London, by Charles Dickens, Jr., 1879 - "LAD-LIB"

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Ladies Shopping without male escort, and requiring luncheon, ran safely visit any of the great restaurants — care being always taken to avoid passing through a drinking bar. In some cases a separate room is set apart for ladies, but there is practically no reason why the public room should be avoided. At some of the great “omnium gatherum” shops, and at institutions such as South Kensington and the Royal Academy luncheon can be obtained while several confectioners at the West-end particularly study the comfort ladies.

Lambeth Bridge
is perhaps, on the whole, the ugliest ever built. It was also—when it was built, at all events—supposed to be the cheapest. It is a suspension bridge of five spans, and one great economy in its construction consists in the use of wire cables in place of the usual chains. It connects Westminster with Lambeth, where it lands close by the Archbishop’s Palace.

Lambeth Palace.
— This quaint old building, for centuries the official residence of the Archbishops of Canterbury, is situate nearly opposite to the Houses of Parliament. The Lollard’s Tower the chapel, the great hall, the great dining-room, and the magnificent library, which contains a remarkable collection of MSS., black letter tracts, &c. are the principal attractions. The picture gallery and the guard chamber contain many curious portraits. Few of the London sights are better worth a visit than Lambeth Palace. NEAREST Railway Stations, Westminster-bridge and Vauxhall; Omnibus Routes, Westminster-bridge-road, Kennington-road, Palace-road, and Harleyford-road.

La Plata
.—(See ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.)

Laundries.—It is impossible to go here into the general question of “the washing,” or to recommend special laundresses. We may, however, point out that in the Soho and Leicester-square neighbourhoods, as well as at Knightsbridge, there is a colony of excellent foreign laundresses, who will get up a shirt in half an hour at a charge of from 6d. to 1s., and who will prepare an elaborate ball-dress in a day.

Law Courts.—
Prior to the Conquest there was only one superior court of justice in the kingdom. This court, called the curia regis, originally sat at Westminster where the king had a palace, anti his treasury and exchequer. It seems to have been originally held at Westminster in a chamber called the exchequer chamber (or chamber ornamented with stars), which was probably the chamber in which in Edward III.s time the king sat with his council to levy fines and amercements for the exchequer. Here too, subsequently sat the celebrated Star Chamber. The Hall of Westminster, or as it is now called Westminster Hall, was built in the time of William Rufus; and it was in this hall up to the year 1820 that the courts were held. The curia regis being bound to follow the king in his progresses the trial of common causes was found much delayed; and it was therefore enacted in Magna Carta that the Common Pleas should sit certo loco. This place was Westminster, and from that time the Common Pleas sat in Westminster Hall. The King’s Bench and the Exchequer still continued to follow the king to any place where he might be; but, as time went on, the courts became separated, and the King’s Bench appears to have sat in Westminster Hall from the time of Henry III. The Chancery was separated from the curia regis as early as the reign of Richard I., but it was not until about the reign of Henry VIII. that the Chancery sat regularly in the Hall, and then only in term time. Out of term the Chancellors sat at various places, sometimes at their own houses.
The appearance of the courts as they were held in the Hall up to the year 1820 is well represented in the familiar drawing of Gravelot. Each court consisted of a simple bench raised within a canopy and side curtain, a bench beneath for the officers of the court, a bar within which were assembled the Queen’s Counsel, and outside stood the barristers and the public. The Chancery and King’s Bench were stationed at the extreme end of the Hall, opposite the great door, near which, in the north-western corner, was the Common Pleas. The rest of the Hall was taken up by the stalls of a booksellers, fruiterers, and others, who plied their trade with as much zeal and noise as did the advocates higher up the Hall. It is not quite known where the Exchequer was; it was probably held, at least, ordinarily, in the Exchequer Chamber, which was also used for the arguments of great questions of law.
So matters stood up to 1820, when the courts now in use were bulk. The pressure of business, however, soon drove the Chancery Court to Lincoln’s-inn, where new courts were erected for the administration of that branch of the law. The new- courts at Westminster were also soon found adequate for the business of the common law, and they had not been built ten years when a violent dispute arose as to their capacity for the constantly increasing business. This agitation gradual1y increased until it culminated in the scheme of the new Palace of Justice now in course of erection.
The present courts in the metropolis are the following:
HOUSE OF LORDS (THE).—The court of ultimate appeal in the kingdom sits in the House of Lords itself to hear appeals from the courts of appeal in England, Scotland1 and Ireland. The House sits not only during the sittings of Parliament, but also during the prorogation at times appointed by the House during the previous session, while the Queen has power, by writing under her sign manual, to authorise them to hear appeals during a dissolution. The appeals are by case, and are regulated by the standing orders of the House, which must be strictly followed. The House of Lords at present in use was opened for judicial business in the year 1847 the old house having been destroyed by fire in the year 1834.
JUDICIAL COMMITTEE OP THE PRIVY COUNCIL (THE) hears appeals from the colonies as well as ecclesiastical cases. It sits in Downing-street, and presents this extraordinary feature, that the judgment of the majority is given as the judgment of the whole court, dissenting judges having no power to express their dissent in any shape or way. Besides the judges who are appointed to sit in the Privy Council, the bishops and archbishops sit as assessors in ecclesiastical cases.
SUPREME COURT OP JUDICATURE (THE), as at present constituted, consists of the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice. The Court of Appeal sits in two Divisions, one at Westminster in Committee Room E, the other at Lincoln’s-inn. The former takes appeals from the Common Law Division, the latter from the Chancery Divisions, including Bankruptcy Appeals.
The High Court of Justice consists of five Divisions, viz.: the Chancery, Queen’s Bench, Common Pleas, Exchequer, and Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty Divisions. The Chancery Division sits at Lincoln’s-inn, the other four at Westminster.
The Queen’s Bench Division still retains exclusive jurisdiction over the civil and criminal proceedings previously exercised by the Crown side of the Court of Queen’s Bench; the Common Pleas Division retains jurisdiction over appeals from Revising Barristers, while the Exchequer retains its powers as a Court of Revenue.
The sittings of the High Court of Appeal, and the sittings in London and Middlesex of the High Court of justice, are four in number, viz.: The Michaelmas Sittings, commencing on the end of November, and terminating on the 21st of December; the Hilary Sittings, commencing on the 11th of January, and terminating on the Wednesday before Easter; the Easter Sittings, commencing on the Tuesday after Easter week, and terminating on the Friday before Whit Sunday; and the Trinity Sittings, commencing on the Tuesday after Whitsun week and terminating on the 8th of August. The Courts in banco, that is, to hear legal arguments on the common law side during these sittings, sit always at Westminster, but the Nisi Prius Courts (for the trial of causes) sit during a portion of the time at the Guildhall, The London sittings are generally held about March and December, and last a fortnight; but the practice now is, if possible, to have concurrent sittings, both at Westminster and Guildhall, during these periods. The Common Law Divisions sit at 10.30 daily, and rise at 4, except on Saturdays, when they rise at 2. The different Courts of the Chancery Division generally sit at 10. The Vacations of the Supreme Court are four in number, the Long Vacation, commencing on the 10th of August, and terminating on the 24th of October; the Christmas Vacation, commencing on the 24th of December, and terminating on the 6th of January; the Easter Vacation commencing on Good Friday and terminating on Easter Tuesday; and the Whitsun Vacation, commencing on the Saturday before Whit Sunday, and terminating on the Tuesday after Whit Sunday. During the Long Vacation two judges sit occasionally at Lincoln’s-inn generally once a week, to dispose of pressing business, and these Vacation Judges (chosen at the commencement of the year) have likewise the power to dispose of such business during other parts of the year when the Courts are not sitting, at times which may not strictly be in vacation. The sittings of the Courts are interrupted at intervals by reason of the Judges having to go on the various circuits, which are now held four times a year.
COURT FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF CROWN CASES RESERVED (THE) sits from time to time in each sitting, to hear appeals on questions of law in criminal cases, there being no appeal in such cases on questions of fact.
LONDON BANKRUPTCY COURT (THE) is held in Lincoln’s-inn-fields, the public entrances being 5, Portugal-street and 34, Lincoln’s-inn-fields. The court is open during vacation, when the office hours are 11 till 2 in term they are 10 till 4, except on Saturdays, when they are to till 2.
SHERIFFS COURT (THE), Red Lion-square, is held merely for the assessment of damages, in cases in which the liability is admitted, and the sole question is the amount of damages to be awarded, as well as in cases for the assessment of compensation under the Lands Clauses Act. It has no fixed sessions, but when any assessment of any nature has to be made, an appointment for the hearing is fixed at the office.
RAILWAY COMMISSIONERS (THE) were appointed in 1873 for the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of the Railway and Canal Traffic Act, 1854, whereby railway and canal companies are required, amongst other things, to afford all reasonable facilities for the forwarding of traffic, and to give no undue preference in favour of any particular person. The commissioners are three in number, and sit from time to time at Westminster.
WRECK COMMISSONERS, COURT (THE) is held at Westminster and other places, when requested by the Board of Trade, to hold investigations into shipping casualties, and the same are generally held by one of the Wreck Commissioners (of whom there cannot be more than three in existence at one time) sitting with assessors. The court derives its powers from the Merchant Shipping Act, 1876.
ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS (THE) are two in number:
Arches Court (The) is a Court of Appeal belonging to the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is held in Westminster, and it has jurisdiction to try appeals from each of the diocesan courts within the province, the diocesan Courts taking cognizance of all ecclesiastical matters arising within their respective limits.
Consistory Court of London (The) is the ordinary court of the bishop, in which all the ecclesiastical causes within his jurisdiction are tried. It is generally held at the Chapter House, St. Paul’s, but not always.
CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT (THE) is held at the Old Bailey. It has jurisdiction to try all treasons, murders, felonies, and misdemeanours committed within the city of London and county of Middlesex, and certain parts of Essex, Kent, and Surrey. The commissions of Oyer and Terminer are issued annually, and on the first day of the Michaelmas sittings the commissioners assemble to fix the sittings, which must be at least twelve in every year, and to appoint the judges who are to attend them according to a certain rota. The list of sittings can always be obtained on application to the clerk of the court.
Two judges attend every session to try the more serious offences, while the Recorder, Common Serjeant, and Judge of the Sheriffs’ Court, preside over the other. In each court one alderman at the least must be present.
Besides this jurisdiction, it may be mentioned that the court has an additional jurisdiction, to try offences committed on the high seas, within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty of England.
POLICE COURTS (THE) —(See POLICE). —The magistrates of these courts are all stipendiaries, and may do any act directed to be done by more than one justice, except at petty sessions. Within the city of London there are two police-courts, viz, the Mansion House and Guildhall. In these courts the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of the City are empowered to act alone, and to do all things which are otherwise required to be done by more than one justice. Within the City, too, any two justices having jurisdiction therein have all the powers which any one magistrate of the before-mentioned police-courts has; while outside the districts assigned to the police courts, but within the Metropolitan District, two magistrates, besides having the ordinary county jurisdiction, have also, when sitting together, the powers of a single magistrate in the same way as two justices within the city of London. The limits of the Metropolitan Police District excludes the city of London, but includes the whole of Middlesex and parts of Surrey, Hertford, Essex, and Kent, within a radius of about t5 miles from Charing-cross. The police-courts are regulated by 2 & 3 Vict. c. 75, and 3 & 4 Vict. c.84, while the City Police is regulated by 2 & 3 Vict. c. 44. The magistrates sitting in the police-courts have a summary and regular jurisdiction. This summary jurisdiction is regulated by various Acts of Parliament, and enables them to dispose of cases coming within it in a summary manner. Such are proceedings in respect of a variety of minor offences, which are prohibited only under pecuniary penalties. This power they can exercise in cases of larceny, when the value of the property stolen does not exceed 5s, provided that the person charged consent to that course being adopted, and provided also that the offence is not one which, owing to a previous conviction, is punishable with penal servitude, in which case he can sentence the prisoner to three months’ imprisonment. In cases of simple larceny exceeding 5s., if the case be one which may be properly disposed of in a summary manner, and if the prisoner plead guilty, the magistrate has power then to sentence him to six months’ imprisonment. In cases beyond their summary jurisdiction, they are bound, if a sufficient case be made out, to commit the prisoner for trial.
MIDDLESEX SESSIONS (THE) are held at the Sessions House, Clerkenwell-green, and at the Sessions House, Westminster ; at the former the court sits to try criminal cases and to transact county business, at the latter to hear appeals, The list of sittings for the year is made up in December, and can be obtained at the office of the clerk of the peace, Clerkenwell-green. A general and adjourned general sessions are held in each month, except in those months appointed for the ordinary quarter sessions, when the quarter sessions and an adjourned quarter sessions are held. There are thus twenty-four sessions in the year. The grand jury are summoned on the Monday, when they take the men’s cases, the bills for the women’s cases are taken on the Tuesday, and a special day is fixed for the bail cases. The court consists of a bench of magistrates, presided over by the Assistant Judge. The appeal days will also be found on the printed list, and are fixed generally in the months of January, April, July, and October; while the applications for licences for music and dancing are generally fixed for a day in October.
GENERAL ASSESSMENT SESSIONS (THE) for the metropolis, are held in February in each year in the Westminster Sessions before three justices of Middlesex (of whom the assistant-judge must be one), two of London, two of Kent, and two of Surrey, who are appointed yearly in October, for determining appeals against the Valuation List made under the Valuation Act, 1869. These lists are made up every five years, during which time they form the basis on which the hereditaments therein valued are to be rated. The first list under the Act came into operation on the 6th April, 1871, so it is from this date the quinquenial period is to be calculated. During this quinquenial period, however, supplemental lists are made each year to meet the cases where alterations in the lists have taken place in the preceding twelve months, or of houses which have been built or altered between the times at which the valuation list is made out. It is for the purpose of hearing appeals from these various lists that the assessment sessions are held.
GENERAL ANNUAL LICENSING MEETING (THE) for Middlesex and Surrey, is required, by 9th Geo. IV. c. 61, to be held within the first, ten days of March in each year. The day, hour, and place of each meeting must be fixed by the justices, 21 days before the meeting. At this meeting the justices assembled are likewise to appoint not less than four or more than eight special sessions for transferring licenses from one person to another and for other contingencies. By long usage the general annual licensing meeting for the city of London is held on the second Monday of the month of March, the Act of 9th Geo. IV.   c. 61, not applying to the city of London. If the justices refuse to grant a new license there is no appeal, and even if they grant one it will not he valid until it be confirmed by the Confirming Committee. The only appeal is against the refusal to renew or transfer a license, in which case an .appeal lies to the quarter sessions.
CONFIRMATION COMMITTEE (THE) is held to confirm the grant of new licenses to sell liquor to be consumed on the premises, without which such grant would not be valid.
SURREY SESSIONS (THE) are held at Newington. There are at least twelve sessions a year, and generally thirteen, and sometimes fourteen— the two latter being for gaol deliveries prior to the assizes. The list of sittings can be obtained at the court. Its proceedings are substantially the same as the Middlesex Sessions, the annual licensing meeting being regulated by the same acts as regulate the holding of the same in Middlesex.
SPECIAL SESSIONS are also held at the different special sessional divisions in the metropolis for various purposes, such as the poor rates, highways, and others. These are always fixed by the justices of special sessions, and particulars of them can be obtained upon application to the clerks of the several sessional divisions.
COURTS WITHIN THE CITY.— The Lord Mayor’s Court.— This court is of very ancient origin, and though the business transacted in it is not so extensive as it was a few years ago, a considerable portion of the litigation arising within the City is disposed of therein. It is an inferior court, but has jurisdiction overall actions without any limitation as to the amount of the debt or damages claimed, provided that in cases where the claim is over £50 the whole cause of action arose within the City. In cases under £50 no objection to the jurisdiction can be taken, provided that the defendant dwells or carries on his business within the City at the time of action brought, or provided he shall have done so within six months before that time, or if the cause of action either wholly or in part arose therein. This court also awards compensation under the Lands Clauses Act. The court sits every month at the Guildhall, the judge being the Recorder, the Common Serjeant, or a deputy appointed by them. The sittings are fixed each month, and are generally held towards the middle of the month. In certain cases there is an appeal to the superior courts. In this court many of the old City customs age still recognised and upheld; the most curious of which is that of foreign attachment, which enables the plaintiff, if the defendant does not appear, or is not within the jurisdiction, to attach any goods or debts owing to the defendant from any person within the jurisdiction. The procedure of this court is regulated by the Mayor’s Court Procedure Act, 1857 (20 & 21 Vict. c. 157).
City of London Court (The) - formerly called the Sheriffs’ Court of the City of London, is now practically a county Court, and is held at Guildhall-buildings in the city of London; the offices being open from 10 till 4, except on Saturdays, when they are open from 10 till 1. It has jurisdiction up to £50, and is regulated by 15 & 16 Vict. c. 77.
Secondaries Court (The) is a Sheriffs’ Court, and is held in the city of London, at the Guildhall. It occupies the same position in the City as the Sheriffs’ Court, Red Lion-square, does in the county of Middlesex, with the exception that it does not assess damages under the Lands Clauses Act, which cases are heard in the Mayor’s Court.
City Sessions (The) are held for the purpose of granting and transferring licenses within the city of London. They are held at the Guildhall from time to time, and information as to them can always be obtained upon application at Guildhall.
Hasting Court (The), a very ancient court in the City, is now obsolete.

Law Society (Incorporated) of the United Kingdom, 103
to 113, Chancery-lane.— This society of attorneys, solicitors, and proctors, was established in 1827, and was incorporated by charter in 1832. In 1833 it instituted courses of lectures for articled clerks and students; in 1836 the judges issued regulations, under which the council, jointly with the masters of the courts, act as examiners of candidates for admission on the roll; in 1843 it was appointed Registrar of Attorneys, under the 6 & 7 Vict. c.73; in 1845 it obtained a second charter containing extended powers; and in 1872 a supplemental charter enlarging its constitution. Additional powers and duties were conferred on the society by the 23 & 24 Vict. c. 127: All persons are examined before entering into and also during their articles of clerkship. In 1877, the power of making regulations for the conduct of the preliminary, intermediate, and final examinations, and of appointing examiners, was practically vested in the Incorporated Law Society, under 40 & 41 Vict. c. 25 (The Solicitors Act, 1877). Admission fee: If the solicitor is proposed as a member within five years from his first certificate, £2 town, £1 country. After that time, £5 town, £2 country- Annual subscription: town members, £2; country £1. The institution comprises the following departments: The hall, open daily from  9am. till 9 p.m., is furnished with the votes and proceedings of Parliament, the London Gazette, morning and evening newspapers, reviews, and other publications. Here also members are enabled to meet one another by appointment and for all purposes of business, and waiting and conference rooms are provided for the use of members. The library is open daily from 9 a.m. till 9 p.m., except from August 10ths to October 24th, when it is closed at 6 p.m., and on Saturdays, when it is closed at 4 p.m. It comprises upwards of 24,000 volumes and is divided into two parts: the north and south wings are for the exclusive use of members, and contain parliamentary works, public records, county history, topography, genealogy, heraldry, works on American, colonial and foreign law, and classical and general literature; the middle, or law library, comprises statutes, reports, digests, treatises and other works relating to the law, and is open to students as well as members. In case any scarce book in the library should be wanted by a member in any of the courts it will be produced under the authority of the council. The articled clerks of members are admitted to the law library on payment of an annual subscription of £2. Lectures on the different branches of the law are delivered in the hall on each Thursday from November to June inclusive. The members are entitled to attend gratis, and their clerks (whether articled or not) are admitted on payment of £1 11s. 6d. for each set of lectures, or £3 3s. for the whole. The clerks of gentlemen not members pay £2 2s for each set, or £4 4s. for the whole; and other students, not falling within either of those classes, are admitted on paying £2 12s. 6d. for each set, or  £5 5s. for the whole. Law classes hay also been instituted for the purpose of facilitating the acquisition of legal knowledge by the articled and other clerks of solicitors. The classes are held from November to June inclusive, and the fee payable by each subscriber is £2 12s. 6d for each branch, or £5 5s. for the whole course. The registry office, for the use of members and the clerks, is open daily from 9 a.m till 6 p.m., except on Saturdays, when it is closed at 2 p.m. He are kept the general and daily cause papers of all the courts, the sitting papers, peremptory papers, special papers, and papers of new trials in the courts of law, and papers of appeals in the House of and Privy Council. In this office is kept the annual roll of solicitors, wherein searches are made to ascertain that annual stamped certificates have be duly taken out. The club consists of members of the society, who pay an entrance fee of £10 10s., and an annual subscription of £6 6s. for town members and £4 4s. for country members. NEAREST Railway Station - Temple; Omnibus Routes, Chancery-lane and Strand; Cab Ranks, Searle-street and Lincoln’s-inn-fields.

Leicester Square
dates from as far back as 1635, when the first house was built by Robert Sydney, Earl of Leicester. In 1671 the south side was completed. Even at this early date the square had particular attraction for foreigners. Colbert, the French ambassador resided here; and Leicester house sheltered Prince Eugene, and saw the end of the troublous life of the Queen of Bohemia. Later Leicester House became the court of George II when Prince of Wales, who in turn was succeeded in opposition by his own son Prince Frederick Perhaps the first theatrical performance known in the square was when a company of amateurs, including the future George III played Addison’s tragedy of Cato. But Leicester-square has more interesting memories than these. At No, 47, on the west side, lived and worked Sir Joshua Reynolds, and on the opposite side, close to the present Alhambra, Hogarth scent some of the best years of his life. Next door to Hogarth lived John Hunter, and, hard by, Sir Isaac Newton had his observatory. Later on Newton’s house was occupied by Dr. Burney, better known as the father of Madame d’Arblay, the authoress of the now almost forgotten Evelina. Many celebrated shows have had their habitation in the square. Miss Linwood’s gruesome exhibition of worsted work; the earliest idea of hatching chickens by steam; assaults of arms ; and even prize-fights at various times, appealed for public support in Savile House on the north side. The Gordon Rioters sacked Savile House and the complete destruction which even they were unable to effect was some years ago consummated by the fire which entirely destroyed it. In the northeast corner of the square flourished for many years one of the best exhibitions in London, Burford’s panorama; and in the middle of the square the Great Globe itself was set up, until the too sensitive feelings of the inhabitants could bear it no longer. On its removal literally a wreck was left behind. The most hideous statue in London, which Mr. Wyld’s enterprise had relegated to a temporary retirement, made its unwelcome reappearance. The condition of the square and of the statue went gradually from bad to worse, until it became one of the crying nuisances of the town. Squalid vegetation, mangy cats, and almost equally mangy street-boys took possession of the enclosure, which by degrees became the common dust-heap of the neighbourhood. At last a band of practical jokers, under cover of a fog, worked such pranks on the mutilated statue, that even the sense of humour of the authorities was excited, and a preliminary clearance was made. Nowadays the square, thanks to the public spirit of Mr. Albert Grant, is neat and orderly, and the benches with which the enclosure is provided are daily used by many hundreds of the surrounding colony. For as it was in its earliest days so is Leicester-square now. It is the capital of the great foreign settlements about Soho. Exiles of every political “stripe” have trod the flags of Leicester-square. It is easy for the experienced Londoner to trace the course of foreign politics by observing the habitués of the square at the time of the morning pipe.

Liberia, Republic of.—
MINISTRY, Cavendish-road, St. John’s Wood.— NEAREST Railway Station, St. John’s Wood-road; Omnibus Route, Wellington-road; Cab Rank, Lord’s Cricket Ground. CONSULATE, 18, Pinner’s Hall, Old Broad-street. NEAREST Railway Station, Bishopsgate; Omnibus Route, Old Broad-street; Cab Rank, Lothbury.

Libraries (Circulating).
—The two principal circulating libraries for ordinary light literature, are W. H. SMITH and SON’S, Strand, with depots for exchange of Books at all their Railway Bookstalls, and MUDIE’S, Oxford-street. Terms for W. H. Smith and Son’s :— 1. Subscribers can only change their books at the depot where their names are registered. A Subscriber may exchange once a day; the Clerk in charge will obtain from London any work in the Library which a Subscriber may desire to have. Novels exchanged only in unbroken and complete Sets. London Subscribers transferring their Subscriptions to a country depot, will be entitled only to the number of volumes which the country terms assign to the amount they subscribe; similarly, Country Subscriptions transferred to Town become subject to the London regulations. Terms —
I. For Subscribers obtaining their Books from a London Terminus, or 186, Strand: 

 

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MUDIE’S LIBRARY, 509, 510, and 511. New Oxford-street. Terms of Subscription for Subscribers obtaining their books from the Town Offices—Class A (All Books in the Library)

 

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City Office, 2, King-st, Cheapside. A supply of Books, consisting chiefly of Popular Works available for the immediate use of Subscribers, always kept in reserve and replenished from day to day. When the Books desired are not in stock, they are obtained from the Head Office with as little delay as possible.

 

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Only one exchange a day allowed on Subscription. The leading Reviews may be obtained as volumes, but only one current Periodical allowed at a time.
The London Book Society for the weekly delivery of Books in London and the Suburbs:

 

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2 Vols. for each additional Guinea

For more substantial works, the LONDON LIBRARY, St. James’s square. Subscription, payable annually in advance, £2. Entrance £6, or £3 annually without Entrance Fee. Members may commute their Annual Subscriptions by payment of £20, or £26. Persons who wish to become Subscribers must send their names to the Librarian, to be submitted to the Committee. Members residing within 10 miles of the General Post Office, London, shall he entitled to take out ten volumes; and Members residing at a greater distance, fifteen at a time ; to be exchanged as often as required. Members desirous of taking out more may, upon payment of an increased subscription, claim an additional number of volumes of old works, or one extra copy of any new work in the Library for every additional pound per annum. The time allowed for the perusal of New Books (ie. books published within the last two years) is fourteen days, to be reckoned from the day of issue, without reference to any summons for the return of the Book.
LONDON INSTITUTION, Finsbury-circus, E.C.—The board of management of this institution are now issuing 300 annual subscribers’ tickets at the present price of £2 12s. 6d. each, giving personal admission for one year from the day of purchase to all lectures, or £2 2s. without lectures, to the use of the circulating library and to read in the reference library and reading-rooms. Lectures are given twice a week (on Mondays at 5 p.m., and Thursdays at 7 p.m.) during four months of the year by men of distinction on science, art, and literature. The circulating library (open 10 a.m. till 9 p.m.— Saturday, 3 p.m.) consists of nearly 4,000 volumes, in all departments, supplemented by an annual subscription of £200 to Messrs. W. H. Smith and Son’s for general literature, and special subscriptions to Messrs. Lewis and Son for scientific books, Mr. Rolandi for foreign books, and Messrs. Augener for musical publications. Each proprietor or annual subscriber may borrow five volumes (one of which must be a magazine or volume of magazines), which he may exchange as frequently as he likes. The reference library (open 10 am. till 9 p.m.—Saturday, 3 p.m.) contains about 60,000 volumes, arranged according to subjects. The best new books are added every month, and Parliamentary papers are taken in and may be consulted without difficulty. Intending annual subscribers are provisionally admitted at once to all privileges on deposit of £2 12s. 6d., are nominated at the next monthly meeting of the board, and balloted for at the second monthly meeting. All letters should be addressed “Principal Librarian, London Institution, Finsbury. circus, E.C.” Personal application may be made in the library between 10 am, and 9 pm. (Saturdays, 3 p.m.).
There are also several smaller libraries, which themselves subscribe to one or other of the large establishments, re-lending the books to their own subscribers.