Victorian London - Transport - Railways, Above Ground - Stations - Charing Cross

Victorian London - Directories - Dickens's Dictionary of London, by Charles Dickens, Jr., 1879 - "Charing Cross Station"

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Charing Cross Station. The West-end terminus of the South-Eastern Railway, the upper portion occupied by a large hotel (see HOTELS) belonging to the company. The ground floor is given up to the booking-offices; that for Continent and main line being on the west, and that for North Kent, &c., on the east side. The custom-house, where registered luggage from the Continent is examined, is at the farther end of the arrival platform. The Cannon street trains run from the platform on the east side of the station where also there is a staircase leading down to the foot of Villiers-street, the Embankment, and the Charing-cross Station of the District Line. It is worth bearing in mind that trains for Dover and elsewhere, starting from Charing-cross, reverse themselves on leaving Cannon-street, so that those who leave the former station with their backs to the engine will have to travel the rest of the way with their faces to it, and vice versa. NEAREST Railway Station, Charing-cross (Dist,); Omnibus Routes, Strand and Whitehall; Cab Rank, In Station.

Charles Dickens (Jr.), Dickens's Dictionary of London, 1879

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - The Charing Cross Hotel

Charing Cross Hotel - photograph

THE CHARING CROSS HOTEL. 

Charing Cross Hotel is situated at the South Eastern Railway Company's western terminus, and lends a dignity to the line which the hideous bridge across the Thames does its best to destroy. Entrance to the station is obtained from the large yard, which generally presents a very busy scene, especially when the Continental mail is about to start. The hotel was built by Sir C. Barry, on the site of Hungerford Market. Charing Cross was once marked by a Gothic Monument, known as Eleanor's Cross, which Edward I. erected to distinguish the spot where his wife's dead body remained a while when being taken to Westminster Abbey. It was erected in 1291, but in 1647 was removed by order of Parliament. The present cross is the work of the late E. M. Barry.

Victorian London - Publications - History - The Queen's London : a Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis, 1896 - Interior of Charing Cross Station

Interior of Charing Cross Station - photograph

INTERIOR OF CHARING CROSS STATION.

The large West End terminus of the South-Eastern Railway, though not a very ornate structure, possesses a lofty and imposing roof. Our view is taken from the end nearest the railway bridge, by which the old suspension bridge now at Clifton was superseded. At this end is the Customs House, where the luggage of passengers arriving from the Continent is examined. At the further end, facing the Strand, is the Charing Cross Hotel, of which a view appears on page 46. Trains leave Charing Cross for Cannon Street every few minutes, and these largely swell the very considerable number of trains that go in and out daily. The most interesting time to visit the station is prior to the departure, or on the arrival, of one of the "boat trains."