Victorian London - Directories - Dickens's Dictionary of London, by Charles Dickens, Jr., 1879 - "R"

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“Rag and Famish”—(See ARMY AND NAVY CLUB.)

Railway Commissioners, West Front Committee Room, House of Lords, S.W.— hours 10 to 5; Saturdays 10 to 2 —(See LAW COURTS.)

Railways.—Though it would be decidedly a triumph of ingenuity so to construct an equal number of miles of railway as give less practical accommodation than is given at present, the London railway system is so vast that it serves every portion of the metropolis. There are one or two maps (see MAPS) specially devoted to the elucidation of this iron labyrinth, but to attempt any mere verbal explanation would be futile. Enough that the North London takes the principal east and west traffic of the northern outskirts, dropping down from Dalston Junction into the heart of the city at Liverpool-street; that the London and Brighton Company’s line, and the London Chatham, and Dover Company’s line, from Victoria to London bridge and Ludgate-hill respectively, perform a somewhat similar office for the southern outskirts; and that the internal work is done by the Charing-cross Railway—thence to Cannon-street —and by what is popularly known by the general name of “the Underground,” which really consists of two distinct railways, the Metropolitan and the Metropolitan District. Trains on these last two lines succeed one another so rapidly and branch off on so many different routes, that it is advisable to make very sure before reaching Gloucester-road on the District, or Edgware-road (Chapel-street) on the Metropolitan, that you are in your proper train. Up to these points all west-going trains are equally available, It will be a help in selecting your train to bear in mind that the ordinary inner circle trains between Aldgate and Mansion House direct carry one white lamp on the engine, and trains between the same points by way of Addison-road two white lights, one vertically above the other. Hammersmith trains on the District line carry two white lights on the same level, and on the Metropolitan, a white and a blue light, sometimes —for the blue light is usually very feeble—liable to be mistaken for the single white light of the short route trains. On the District line trains running through to Richmond carry an additional white lamp; on the Metropolitan such trains carry two blue lamps. The Broad-street trains on the District line—via Addison-road and Willesden--carry two while lights “in a slantindicular direction.” All the District stations, and a few of the Metropolitan, have a shifting board suspended just by the entrance to the platform, on which are inscribed the stations served by the train next due. There are also at many stations boards indicating the points at which travellers of the various classes should wait for the carriages they require. It is worth remembering by those to whom it is otherwise indifferent which line they take, that on the Metropolitan line, if you find it convenient to go on to a station beyond that marked on your ticket, you will be compelled, even though the fare from the starting point be the same, to pay the full amount chargeable between the two stations. On the District line every ticket is available to the full extent of the fare it represents, irrespective of the precise destination for which it may originally have been issued. Metropolitan and District trains are invariably made up with the second class carriages at the Aldgate and third-class at the Mansion House, or—in the case of trains running from either of these stations to Hammersmith —at the Hammersmith end; the mixed first and second smoking-carriage being the last of the seconds. This rule, however, does not hold good with the foreign trains running over the District line. The three great exchange junctions are Clapham Junction on the S. Western, Addison-road on the Gt. Western, and Willesden on the N. Western; from either of which points you may you’re your way easily to almost any other.

Railway Stations with the companies to which they belong:
ABBEY WOOD S. Eastern
ACTON Gt. Western
ACTON Midland
ACTON London
ALDERSGATE-ST Metropolit.
ALDGATE District
ALEXANDRA PALACE Gt.Northern
ALEXANDRA PALACE N. London
BAKER-STREET Metropolit.
BALHAM L.B.&S.C.
BALHAM L.& N.W
BARKING Gt. Eastern
BARKING ROAD (Canning-town) Gt.Eastern
BARNES S. Western
BARNET Gt. Northn
BARNET HIGH Gt. Northn
BATTERSEA W.L. Ext.
BATTERSEA PARK S.London
BAYSWATER Metropol.
BERMONDSEY, SOUTH S.London
BETHNAL-GR. JUNC. Gt.Eastern
BISHOPSGATE Metropolit.
BLACKFRIARS District
BLACKFRIARS BRIDGE L.C.& D
BLACKHEATH S.Eastern
BLACKHEATH HILL L.C.& D
BOROUGH-ROAD L.C.& D
BOW N.London
BRIXTON L.C.& D
BRIXTON S. London
BROMLEY S.Eastern
BROMLEY L.C.& D
BUCKHURST-HILL Gt. Eastern
BUSHEY L.&N.W
CALEDONIAN-ROAD (Barnsbury) N.London
CAMBERWELL NEW-ROAD L.C.& D
CAMBRIDGE HEATH Gt. Eastern
CAMDEN-ROAD N. London
CANNING-TOWN Gt. Eastern
CANNON-STREET S. Eastern
CANONBURY N.London
CARSHALTON L.B.& S.C.
CHALK FARM N. London
CHALK FARM L. & N.W
CATERHAM S. Eastern
CATERHAM JUNCTION S. Eastern
CHAMPION-HILL S.London
CHARING-CROSS S. Eastern
CHARING-CROSS District
CHEAM L.B. & S.C
CHELSEA W.L Ext.
CHIGWELL-LANE Gt. Eastern
CHILD’S-HILL Midland
CHINGFORD Gt. Eastern
CHISWICK S. Western
CLAPHAM JUNCTION L.B. & S.C.
CLAPHAM JUNCTION L.& N.W.
CLAPHAM JUNCTION S. Western
CLAPHAM ROAD L.C.& D
CLAPTON Gt. Eastern
COLNEY HATCH Gt. Northn
CRAYFORD S.Eastern
CRICKLEWOOD Midland
CROUCH END Gt. Northn
CROYDON (ADDISCOMBE-ROAD) S. Eastern
CROYDON (WEST) L.B & S.C.
CROYDON (EAST) L.B & S.C.
CROYDON (SOUTH) L.B & S.C.
CROYDON (NEW) L.B & S.C.
CRYSTAL PALACE L.B & S.C.
CRYSTAL PALACE L.C. & D
CUSTOM HOUSE Gt. Eastern
DALSTON JUNCTION N. London
DARTFORD S. Eastern
DENMARK-HILL L. C. & D.
DENMARK HILL S. London
DEPTFORD S. Eastern
DEPTFORD ROAD E. London
DUDDING-HILL Midland
DULWICH L.C. & D.
DULWICH NORTH S. London
EALING Gt. Western
EALING DEAN Gt. Western
EARL’S COURT District
EAST END, FINCHLEY.. Gt. Northn.
EASTHAM Gt. Eastern
EASTHAM N. London
EDGWARE Gt. Northn.
EDGWARE ROAD Metropolit.
EDMONTON Gt. Eastern
ELEPHANT & CASTLE L.C. & D.
ELSTREE Midland
ELTHAM S. Eastern
ENFIELD Gt. Eastern
ENFIELD Gt. Northn.
ENFIELD HIGHWAY Gt. Eastern
EPPING Gt. Eastern
EPSOM L.B & S.C.
EPSOM S. Western
EPSOM DOWNS L B&S.C.
ERITH S. Eastern
ESHER S. Western
EUSTON-SQUARE L. & N. W.
EWELL L.B.& S.C.
EWELL S. Western
FARRINDON-ST. Metropolit.
FINCHLEY Gt. Northn.
FINCHLEY N. London
FINCHLEY ROAD N. London
FINCHLEY ROAD Midland
FINSBURY-PARK Gt. Northn.
FINSBURY-PARK N. London
FOREST-GATE Gt. Eastern
FOREST-HILL L.B.& SC.
GIPSY-HILL L.B. & S.C.
GLOUCESTER-ROAD Metropolit.
GOSPEL OAK N. London
GOWER-STREET Metropolit.
GRAVESERD S. Eastern
GRAYS Gt. Eastern
GRAYS N. London
GEEENHITHE S. Eastern
GREENWICH L. & Green.
GROSVENOR-ROAD L.B. & S.C.
HACKNEY N. London
HACKNEY-DOWNS Gt Eastern
HACKNEY WICK (Victoria-park) N. London
HAMMERSMITH Metropolit.
HAMMERSMITH S. Western
HAMMERSMITH Midland
HAMMERSMITH N. London
HAMMERSMITH L. C. & D.
HAMPSTEAD- HEATH N. London
HAMPTON S. Western
HAMPTON COURT S. Western
HAMPTON WICK S. Western
HAMPTON WICK L. C. & D.
HANWELL Gt.Western
HARROW L. &N.W.
HARROW-ROAD Midland
HATFIELD Gt. Northn.
HENDON Midland
HERNE-HILL. L. C. & D.
HIGHBURY N. London
HIGHGATE Gt. Northn.
HIGHGATE-ROAD Midland
HOLBORN-VIADUCT L. C. & D.
HOLLOWAY Gt. Northn.
HOLLOWAY UPPER Midland
HONOR OAK L. C. & D.
HORNSEY-ROAD Midland
HOUNSLOW S.Western
HOUNSLOW L. C. & D.
ILFORD Gt. Eastern
ISLEWORTH (Springgrove) S.Western
ISLINGTON (Highbury) N. London
JUNCTION-ROAD Midland
KENLEY (Caterham Junction) S. Eastern
KENSAL GREEN L.& N. W.
KENSINGTON Metropolit.
KENSINGTON L. & N. W
KENTISH TOWN N. London
KENTISH TOWN Midland
KENTISH TOWN L. & N.W,
KEW-BRIDGE N. London
KEW-BRIDGE S. Western
KEW GARDENS S. Western
KEW GARDENS N. London
KILBURN L.&N.W.
KILBURN N. London
KING’S-CROSS Metropolit.
KING’S-CROSS Gt. Northn.
KINGSTON, NEW S. Western
KINGSTON, NEW L. C. & D.
KINGSTON S. Western
LATIMER-ROAD Metropolit.
LEA-BRIDGE Gt. Eastern
LEATHERHEAD S. Western
LEATHERHEAD L. B. & S. C.
LEE S. Eastern
LEIGH. Gt. Eastern
LEMAN-STEEET Gt. Eastern
LEWISHAM JUNCTION S. Eastern
LEWISHAM ROAD L. C. & D.
LEYTON, LOW Gt. Eastern
LEVTONSTONE Gt. Eastern
LIMEHOUSE Gt. Eastern
LONDON-BRIDGE L.B. & S. C.
LONDON-BRIDGE S. Eastern
LONDON-FIELDS Gt. Eastern
LORDSHIP-LANE L C. & D.
LOUGHTON Gt. Eastern
LOWER NORWOOD L.B.&S. C.
LOWER SYDENHAM S. Eastern
LUDGATE-HILL S. Eastern
LUDGATE-HILL L C. & D.
MALDEN, NEW S. Western
MALDEN, NEW L. C. & D.
MANOR-PARK Gt. Eastern
MANSION HOUSE Metropolit.
MARLBOROUGH - RD., ST. JOHN’S WOOD Metropolit.
MARYLAND-POINT Gt. Eastern
MAZE-HILL S. Eastern
MERTON, LOWER .. L.B & S.C.
MERTON, LOWER L. C.& D.
MERTON, LOWER S. Western
MILL-HILL Midland
MILL-HILL Gt. Northn.
MILLWALL JUNCTIONG Gt. Eastern
MITCHAM L.B.&S.C.
MITCHAM S. Western
MOORGATE-STREET Metropolit.
MUSWELL-HILL Gt.Northn.
NEW-CROSS L.B.&S.C.
NEW-CROSS S. Eastern
NEW CROYDON .. L.B. & S. C
NEW MALDEN .. S. Western
NEW WANDSWORTH (Clapham Jn.) L.B. & S.C.
NEW WANDSWORTH (Clapham Jn.) S. Western
NORBITON S. Western -
NORBURY L.B.& S.C.
NORTHWEALD Gt. Eastern
NORTH WOOLWICH Gt. Eastern
NORWOOD JUNCTION L.B. & S.C.
NORWOOD JUNCTION S. Western
NOTTING-HILL Metropolit.
NOTTING-HILL GATE, Metropolit.
NUNHEAD L. C. & D.
OAKLEIGH-PARK Gt. Northn.
OLD FORD Gt. Eastern
OLD FORD N. London
OLD KENT-ROAD S. London
OLD KENT-ROAD E. London
OLD MALDEN AND WORCESTER-PARK S. Western
ONGAR Gt. Eastern
ORDNANCE FACTORY Gt. Eastern
ORPINGTON S. Eastern
PARK Gt. Eastern
PECKHAM (Qn’s.-rd.) S. London
PECKHAM E. London
PECKHAM-RYE L. C. & D.
PECKHAM-RYE S. London
PECKHAM-RYE E. London
PENGE L.B & S. C.
PENGE L.C.&D.
PINNER L. & N. W.
PLAISTOW Gt. Eastern
PLUMSTEAD S. Eastern
PONDER’S END Gt. Eastern
POPE-STREET (for N. Eltham) S. Eastern
POPLAR N. London
POPLAR Gt. Eastern
PORTLAND-ROAD Metropolit.
POTTER’S BAR Gt. Northn.
PRAED-STREET Metropolit.
PUTNEY S. Western
PUTNEY L.C.&D.
QUEEN’S ROAD (Peckham) S. London
QUEEN’S-RD. (Btsea) S. Western
QUEEN’S-RD (Bayswater) Metropolit.
RAYNE S-PARK S. Western
RICHMOND N. London
RICKMANSWORTH L. & N.W.
ROMFORD Gt. Eastern
ROTHERHITHE E. London
ROYAL OAK Metropolit.
ROYDON Gt. Eastern
ROYDON Midland
RYE-HOUSE Gt. Eastern
ST. ALBANS L. & N.W.
ST. JAMES’S-PARK . District
ST. JOHN’S S. Eastern
ST. JOHN’S-WOOD Metropolit.
ST. MARY-CRAY L. C. & D.
SEVEN SISTERS (Tottenham) Gt. Eastern
SHADWELL Gt. Eastern
SHADWELL E. London
SHAFTESBURY-ROAD S. Western
SHEPHERD’S BUSH . Metropolit.
SHEPHERD’S BUSH S. Western
SHEPHERD’S BUSH L.C.& D.
SHEPPERTON S. Western
SHOREDITCH N. London
SHOREDITCH E. London
SHORTLANDS S. Eastern
SHORTLANDS L.C.& D
SILVER-STREET (Edmonton) Gt. Eastern
SILVERTOWN Gt. Eastern
SLOANE-SQUARE Metropolit.
SNARESBROOK Gt. Eastern
SNOW-HILL L. C. & D.
SOUTHALL Gt. Western
SOUTH BERMONDSEY S. London
SOUTHEND Gt. Eastern
SOUTHGATE Gt. Northn.
SOUTH KENSINGTON District
SPA-ROAD S. Eastern
SPRING-GR (Isleworth) S. Western
STAMFORD-HILL Gt. Eastern
STEPNEY L & Blkwl.
STOCKWELL, NORTH (Clapham) L C. & D.
STOCKWELL, SOUTH (Brixton) S. Western
STRAWBERRY-HILL S. Western
STREATHAM L.B.& S.C.
STREATHAM L.C.&D.
STREATHAM HILL L.B.& S.C.
STREATHAM COMMON L.B. & S.C.
SUDBURY L. & N.W.
SUNBURY S. Western
SURBITON S. Western
SUTTON L.B. & S.C.
SWISS COTTAGE . . Metropolit.
SYDENHAM L.B.& S.C.
SYDENHAM HILL L. C. & D.
SYDENHAM, LOWER S. Eastern
TEDDINGTON . S. Western.
TEMPLE District
THAMES HAVEN Gt. Eastern
THAMES DITTON S. Western
THORNTON-HEATH..L.B. & S.C.
TILBURY Gt. Eastern
TORRINGTON-PARK AND WOODSIDE Gt. Northn.
TOTTENHAM Gt. Eastern
TOTTENHAM SOUTH Midland
TULSE-HILL L.B.& S.C.
TULSE-HILL.. L.C. & D
TURNHAM-GREEN Metropolit.
TURNHAM-GREEN S. Western
TURNHAM-GREEN Midland
TWICKENHAM S. Western
TWICKENHAM L. C. & D
UPPER HOLLOWAY  Midland
UPPER NORWOOD L.B. & S.C.
UPTON-PARK Gt. Eastern
UXBRIDGRE. Gt. Western
UXBRIDGE ROAD Metropolit.
UXBRIDGE ROAD S. Western
VAUXHALL S. Western
VAUXHALL L.& N.W.
VICTORIA L.B. & S.C.
VICTORIA L.C.&D.
VICTORIA District
VICTORIA DOCKS Gt. Eastern
VICTORIA DOCKS N. London
VICTORIA-PARK (for Hackney Wick) N.London
WALTHAM Gt. Eastern
WALTON AND HERSHAM S. Western
WALWORTH-ROAD L. C. & D.
WANDSWORTH S. Western
WANDSWORTH L.C.&-D.
WANDSWORTH-COM. L. B. & S.C
WANDSWORTH-ROAD S. London
WANDSWORTH-ROAD L.C. & D
WAPPING E. London
WARLINGHAM S. Eastern
WATER-LANE (station at Angel-rd.) Gt Eastern
WATERLOO .. . S. Western
WATERLOO JUNC. S. Eastern
WATFORD L.& N.W.
WELSH HARP L & N.W.
WESTBOURNE-PARK Gt. Western
WEST BROMPTON S. Western
WEST BROMPTON L.&N.W.
WEST BROMPTON L. C. & D.
WEST DRAYTON Gt. Western
WEST END (for Kilburn & Hampton) Midland
WEST INDIA DOCKS Gt. Eastern
WESTMINSTER District
WHITECHAPEL E. London
WHITE-HART- LANE (Tottenham) Gt. Eastern
WHITTON (Hounslow) S. Western
WILLESDEN JUNC. L. & N. W
WIMBLEDON S. Western
WIMBLEDON L.B.& S.C.
WINCHMORE-HILL Gt. Northn.
WOODFORD Gt. Eastern
WOOD-GREEN Gt. Northn.
WOODSIDE S. Eastern
WOOD-ST. (Walthamstow) Gt. Eastern
WOOLWICH TOWN Gt. Eastern
WOOLWICH NORTH Gt. Eastern
WOOLWICH ARSENAL  S. Eastern
WOOLWICH DOCKYD. S. Eastern
WORCESTER-PARK.. S. Western
WORMWOOD SCRUBS Metropolit.
YORK-ROAD AND BATTERSEA L.B. & S.C.

Railway Ticket Offices. - Branch offices for the sale of tickets have been opened by several of the principal railway companies as under:
GREAT EASTERN— 28, Piccadilly-circus; 105, Fleet-st, Ludgate-Circus.
GREAT NORTHERN.— West End: 3, Albert-ter, Westbourne-grove; 313, Oxford-st; 32, Piccadilly-circus; Victoria passenger station (L. C. & D. R.); 1, William-st, Lowndes-Sq. City District: “Bee-Hive,” Whitecross-st; Bull and Mouth Office, St. Martin’s-le-Grand; Charles-st, Farringdon-st; Crutched Friars; 16, Fish-st-hill ; Royal Mint-st goods station, Minories. Eastern District: Poplar Docks, Preston-rd, Victoria Docks. Central District: 264, Holborn; 111, Strand; 371, Strand; South Side of the Thames: 95 High-st, Borough; 180, Westminster-bridge-rd.
GREAT WESTERN (Excursion season only).—5, Arthur-st, London-bridge; 38, Charing-cross; 4, Cheapside; 44, Crutched Friars; 67, Gresham-st; 483, New Oxford-st; 105, Fleet-st, Ludgate-circus; Kingston’s booking-office, Fitzroy-sq.
LONDON,CHATHAM AND DOVER —105, Fleet-st, Ludgate-circus.
LONDON AND NORTH WESTERN —Spread Eagle Office, Regent-circus ; 350, Oxford-st ; Swan -Office, Gresham-st; Albert-gate Office, Knightsbridge; Golden Cross Office, Charing-cross; St. Martin’s-lane; Spread Eagle Office, Gracechurch-st.
LONDON AND SOUTH WESTERN —30, Regent-st, Piccadilly-circus; Exeter Building, Arthur-st-west
LONDON, TILBURY, AND SOUTHEND.—28, Regent-street, Piccadilly.
METROPOLITAN. — Piccadilly-circus and Oxford-circus.
MIDLAND.—445, West Strand and 105, Fleet-street, Ludgate circus.

Raleigh Club, Regent-street, S. W. — Proprietary. No candidate is eligible for ballot less he shall have reached the age of 21 years, or shall have served not less than one year in the army, the militia, or civil service, or five years in the navy, or be already a member of one of certain first-class London clubs The kitchen is closed at 3 a.m. the bar, card, and billiard rooms at 4 a.m. and no fresh rubber of whist game of cards, or billiards shall be commenced after 3.30 a.m. Entrance fee, £26 5s.; subscription, £10 10s.

Ratcliff Highway.—This, which until within the last few years was one of the sights of the metropolis, and almost unique in Europe as a scene of coarse riot and debauchery, is now chiefly noteworthy as an example of what may be done by effective police supervision thoroughly carried out. The dancing-rooms and foreign cafés of the Highway — now rechristened St. George’s-street—are still well worthy a visit from the student of human nature, and are each, for the most part, devoted almost exclusively to the accommodation of a single nationality. Thus at the “Rose and Crown,” near the western end of the Highway, the company will be principally Spanish and Maltese. At the “Preussische Adler,” just by the entrance into Wellclose-square, you will meet, as might be anticipated, German sailors; whilst Lawson’s, a little farther east, though kept by a German, finds its clientele among the Norwegian and Swedish sailors, who form no inconsiderable or despicable portion of the motley crews of our modem mercantile fleet. Over the way, a little farther down, is the Italian house, a quaint and quiet place, full of models and “curios” of every conceivable and inconceivable description, and nearly opposite the large and strikingly clean caravanserai, where a pretty, but anxious-looking Maid of Athens receives daily, with a hospitality whose cordiality hardly seems to smack of fear, any number of gift-bearing Greeks. These two latter, by-the-way, are not dancing-rooms, but boarding-houses pure and simple ; whilst farther still to the eastward is yet another variety in the shape of a music hall, where Dolly Dripping, the cook, in a draggled old print gown and a huge (natural) moustache; and Corporal Coldmutton, of the Guards, in a cast militia tunic, and a tattered pair of mufti inexpressibles; and Pleeseman X 999, in the general get up of a Guy Fawkes in a bankrupt pantomime, make simple fun for the edification of Quashie and Sambo, whose shining ebony faces stand jovially out even against the grimy blackness of the wails. Perfectly well conducted is the performance at the “Bell,” without the smallest need to shrink from comparison in that respect with the first of our West-end music halls. The performance is not of a refined description, nor is the audience; but it is just possible that, from an exclusively moral point of view, the advantage may even be proved to be not altogether on the side of the higher refinement. Hard by Quashie’s music-hall is a narrow passage, dull and empty, even at the lively hour of 11 pm., through which, by devious ways, we penetrate at length to a squalid cul-de-sac, which seems indeed the very end of all things. Chaos and space are here at present almost at odds which is which, for improvement has at the present moment only reached the point of partial destruction, and some of the dismal dog-holes still swarm with squalid life, while others gape tenantless and ghastly with sightless windows and darksome doorways, waiting their turn to be swept away into the blank open space that yawns by their side. At the bottom of this slough of grimy Despond is the little breathless garret where Johnny the Chinaman swelters night and day curled up on his gruesome couch, carefully toasting in the dim flame of a smoky lamp the tiny lumps of delight which shall transport the opium-smoker for awhile into his paradise. If you are only a casual visitor you will not care for much of Johnny’s company, and will speedily find your way down the filthy creaking stairs into the reeking outer air, which appears almost fresh by contrast. Then Johnny, whose head and stomach are seasoned by the unceasing opium pipes of forty years, shuts the grimy window down with a shudder as unaffected as that with which you just now opened it, and toasts another little dab of the thick brown drug in readiness for the next comer. But if you visit Johnny as a customer, you pay your shilling, and curl yourself up on another grisly couch, which almost fills the remainder of the apartment. Johnny hands you an instrument like a broken-down flageolet, and the long supple brown fingers cram into its microscopic bowl the little modicum of magic, and you suck hard through it at the smoky little flame, and—if your stomach be educated and strong — pass duly off into elysium. Then, when your blissful dream is over, you go your way, a wiser if not a sadder man. Perhaps the most appropriate visit you can next pay is to the casual ward of St. George’s Workhouse, hard by, at the bottom of Old Gravel-lane, and thence, if it be not too late in the evening, to the mission church of St. Peter’s, Dock-street, hard by, where you will find in full work an agency which, if the people of the neighbourhood are to be believed, has had in the marvellous transformation which has taken place a more potent influence oven than police and parliament combined. Returning thence to Shadwell High-street, you may visit the “White Swan,” popularly known as “Paddy’s Goose,” once the uproarious rendezvous of half the tramps and thieves of London, now quiet, sedate, and, to confess the truth, dull—very dull. Down to the right here, again, is the little waterside police-station, where the grim harvest of the “drag,” the weird flotsam and jetsam of the cruel river, lies awaiting the verdict that will— let us hope— “find it Christian burial.” And so back into the highway again, and up Cannon-street road, where stands St. George’s Church, the scene of the famous riots of 1858-59, which gave the first popular impulse to the “ritualistic” movement, and out into the wide Commercial-road, the boundary of “Jack’s” dominion, beyond which again lie the bustling ‘Yiddisher” quarter of Whitechapel and the swarming squalor of Spitalfields.

Reading Rooms.—
AMERICAN EXCHANGE AND READING ROOMS, 449, Strand.—Terms: 2s. per month (or less term); £2 a year. The largest collection of American newspapers on this side the Atlantic.
CITY CENTRAL NEWS ROOM, 13, Philpot-lane, E.C. — Terms: 15s. per year; 8s. half-year; 5s. per quarter; 2s. per month; 6d. per week. Single admission, 1d.
DEACON’S INDIAN & COLONIAL ROOMS, 154, Leadenhall-street.— Terms: Open free for the use of the customers of the firm. Strangers pay 30s. per annum. The proprietors, Messrs. Samuel Deacon and Co., act as agents for numerous English, Colonial, and Foreign papers, copies of which are filed by them, and they receive advertisements for the same. Established in 1822, and carried on uninterruptedly to the present time.
SEAMAN’S CHRISTIAN FRIEND SOCIETY’S SAILORS’ READING ROOMS, 215, St. George’s-street, London Docks, E.—Free.

Record Office, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.—Collection of Manuscripts, &c., including Doomsday Book. With the exception of the search-rooms the building is not generally open to inspection. The search-rooms are approached from the entrance in Fetter-lane. The visitor, on entering the building, faces a bust of Lord Langdale, “first statutory keeper of the Rolls,” and, taking the passage to the right, will find a book in which it is necessary to inscribe name and address. Just beyond this, to the left, is the entrance to the search. rooms. These are open every day except Sunday, Christmas Day to New Year’s Day inclusive, Good Friday and the Saturday following, Easter Monday and Tuesday, Whit Monday and Tuesday, Her Majesty’s Birthday and Coronation Day, and days appointed for public fasts or thanksgivings. Open from 10 till 4, except on Saturdays; then from 10 till 2. Each searcher is to write his name and address daily in the attendance-book. Searchers are not allowed to inspect any documents upon which restrictions are placed, without obtaining permission of the department to which they appertain. The designation of each record required is to be written by the searcher on a separate ticket, unless it extends to more than one part of a roll or volume, in which case the several parts or volumes may be asked for on a single ticket. Each searcher is allowed to have three documents, books, rolls, or parts of rolls at a time. The officer has power to increase, at his discretion, the number. Documents are not to be taken into the search-rooms unless stamped. A searcher may take notes or a full copy of any record, and examine the same with the record; but no officer shall examine, correct, or certify such copy or extracts. No officer is allowed to act as a record agent, or to make a search or copy for his own profit. Tracings are not allowed without permission. Office copies are to be made and delivered according to priority of application, except in special cases. Fees are to be paid in advance together with the expenses of the officer on attendances. No mark in pencil or ink, or otherwise, is permitted to be made on any record, document or book; and any searcher damaging a record with ink shall be deprived of the privilege of using ink in future, unless by the permission of the Master of the Rolls, in writing. The paper on which a searcher is writing should not be placed on any record or book, nor pens containing ink on the desks or tables. Records, documents, books, or other articles belonging to the Public Record Office, are not to be taken out of the search-rooms. Searchers are to replace the calendars or indexes which they have been using, and to return the records, documents, and books they have received to the offices.
TABLE OF FEES
For authenticated copies per folio of seventy-two words:
Documents to the end of the reign of George II., 1s.
Documents after the reign of George II., 6d.
Authenticated copies of plans, drawings, &c., per hour, 2s. 6d.
Attendance at either House of Parliament to be sworn, £1 1s.
Attendance at either Home of Parliament, or elsewhere, to give evidence, or with ten records or less number, per diem, £2 2s
For each additional record each day, 2s.
Attendance on the Master of the Rolls as a Vacatur, £1 1s.
Attendance to receive mortgage-money, 5s.
Attendance on payment of mortgage-money, 10s. 6d.
There is a “Handbook of the Public Records” by F. S. Thomas, secretary of the Public Records, published by Eyre and Spottiswoode.
NEAREST Railway Stations, Blackfriars (Dist.), Farringdon. street (Met.), and Ludgate-hill (L. C. & D.) ; Omnibus Routes, Fleet-street, Holborn, Chancery-lane, and Farringdon-street; Cab Ranks, Farringdon-street and Holborn.

Reform Club, Pall-mall.— Is instituted for the purpose of promoting the social intercourse of the Reformers of the United Kingdom. Candidates must be Reformers and socially eligible.
Entrance fee, £40; subscription, £10 10s.

Regent Circus.—A name ingeniously given at the first formation of Regent-street to two different sites at the opposite ends of that thoroughfare: the one where it crosses Oxford-street, the other its point of intersection with Piccadilly. The eternal fitness of things has by this time pretty well vindicated itself, and the two circuses are practically always known—as we have distinguished them throughout in the DICTIONARY—respectively as Oxford and Piccadilly Circus. Probably in another generation or two even the official mind will take note of the fact, and the absurdity will be removed in form, as it already has been in practice.

Regent’s Park is a large open space nearly three miles round, but a good deal taken up by the grounds of the Zoological and Botanical Societies, the Baptist College, and sundry private villas. It affords a pretty drive, and is surrounded by terraces of good but rather expensive houses. It is a great place for skating. A band plays near the broad walk on Sunday in the summer, and a vast amount of cricket of a homely class enlivens the north-eastern portion of the park on Saturday afternoons. NEAREST Railway Stations, Portland-road and St. John’s Wood-rd; Omnibus Routes, Marylebone-road, Albany-street, and Park-road.

Regent Street is one of the finest thoroughfares in London, which is mainly attributable to the fact that it owes its design to one architect instead of to half-a-dozen. It was planned and built by Nash in 1813. Starting from the south end of Portland-place it crosses Oxford-street, and runs for some distance in an almost straight line until it reaches Vigo-street. Here begins the bold curve known as the Quadrant, each side of which in its early days formed an arcade. The interception of light caused by this arrangement, and the too convenient shelter it afforded for undesirable company, caused the removal of these structures many years ago, clearly to the gain of the architectural effect. At the end of the Quadrant, a short turn to the right opens a fine view
of the towers of the new Palace at Westminster, broken by the Guards’ Memorial and the Duke of York’s Column; and Regent-street, crossing Piccadilly and the Circus, is continued by Waterloo-place past Pall Mall to the steps leading to St. James’s. park. No thoroughfare in London is more thronged during the season, or presents a gayer aspect. In the busiest time of the afternoon, from four to six, two great tides of carriages ebb and flow, north and south, east and west, along and across the broad track of Regent-street. Pedestrians of every class, from the fashionable lounger to the street Arab; from the duchess to the work-girl; from the bewigged and padded roué to the bright and rosy boy fresh from school; from the quietly-dressed English gentleman to the flashily-arrayed foreign count of doubtful antecedents; from the prima donna assoluta to the “lion comique” from the county magnate to the shoddy millionaire, surge and jostle along the crowded footway. As is the case with the other great thoroughfares in London, Regent-street has its favourite side, and although some of the handsomest and most attractive shops, even in this street of tradesmen’s palaces, are on the western side; it is comparatively deserted by passengers, as are the southern sides of Oxford-street and Piccadilly, the western side of St. James’s-street, and the sunny side of Pall Mall. Regent-street is not distinguished for public buildings. Langham Church, with its extinguisher spire, at the extreme north end; Hanover Chapel, close to Hanover-street; and Archbishop Tenison’s Chapel, opposite New Burlington-street, are all that it is necessary to mention. The principal places of public amusement are the Polytechnic Institution, St. George’s Hall, and St. James’s Hall.

Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths are now kept at Somerset House, and may be searched over any period not exceeding 5 years, on payment of the fee of 1/-. If a certified copy of any entry be required, the charge, in addition to the 1/- for the search, is 2/7, which includes stamp duty of 1d. The registers contain entries of all births, deaths, and marriages registered since 1st July, 1837. it is not generally known that on going to the General Register Office to search for death, it may at the same time be ascertained whether a Will has been proved, or letters of administration granted for the disposal of the deceased’s effects. There are also local registry offices in every district, where the ordinary business of registration can be effected.

Religious Societies,—The following are the principal religious societies, with their objects and terms of subscription, according to official returns furnished at the editor’s request by their respective secretaries. The societies omitted are those from which his request for information has failed to elicit any reply:
ADDITIONAL HOME BISHOPRICS ENDOWMENT FUND, 7, Whitehall — Subscription: (not stated). Object: The increase of the episcopate by the endowment of new sees.
ARMY SCRIPTURE READER AND SOLDIERS’ FRIEND SOCIETY, 4, Trafalgar-square, Charing-cross Object:  To send Scripture readers among the army.
BIBLE TRANSLATION SOCIETY, 19, Castle-street, Holborn.— Subscription: (no information). Object: To aid in printing and circulating those translations of the Holy Scriptures from which the British and Foreign Bible Society has withdrawn its assistance, on the ground that the words relating to the ordinance of Baptism have been translated by terms signifying “immersion ;“ and further to aid in producing and circulating other versions of the Word of God similarly faithful and complete.
BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, 146, Queen Victoria-street—Bankers’ drafts and post office orders at the General Post Office should be made payable to Mr. Charles Finch, to whom all letters containing remittances should be directed, “Bible Society House, 146, Queen Victoria-street, London”. Subscription: £1 1s. annually; £10 10s, member for life; £5 5s. annually; £50, governor for life. Object: The sole object shall be to encourage the wider circulation of the Holy Scriptures, without note or comment: the only copies in the languages of the United Kingdom, to be circulated by the society, shall be the authorised version. This society shall add its endeavours to those employed by other societies for circulating the scriptures throughout the British dominions: and shal1 also, according to its ability, extend its influence to other countries, whether Christian, Mohammedan, or Pagan.
BRITISM AND IRISH BAPTIST HOME MISSION 19, Castle-st Holborn. — Subscription: Voluntary; donors of £10 are life members. Object: The spread of the Gospel in Great Britain and Ireland.
BRITISH SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL AMONG THE JEWS, 96, Great Russell-street.
CHRISTIAN COLPORTAGE ASSOCIATION FOR ENGLAND, 37, Farringdon-street.— Object: The dissemination of Christian evangelical literature by means of colporteurs visiting from house to house, thus to counteract the effects of pernicious literature.
CHRISTIAN MENS UNION GOSPEL MISSION (Established 1862), 14, Camden-street, Oakley-square.—Object: To spread religion among the very poorest, the outcasts, and the abandoned of London; to feed, clothe, instruct, end visit them.
CHURCH BUILDING SOCIETY, 7, Whitehall.— Subscription: £1 1s., or a donation of £10 10s., confers privileges of membership. Object: Enlargement, building and repairing of churches and chapels in England and Wales.
CHURCH DEFENCE INSTITUTION, St. Stephen’s Palace-chambers, Westminster; City of London branch, 22, Charterhouse-square.— Subscription: Members, not less than 5s. ; associates, 1s. 6d. per annum; entitling each to a copy of National Church per month. Object: To combine persons of all classes, without reference to political or religious opinion, in defence of the established Church of England; to circulate correct information about it; to resist, in the House of Commons and elsewhere, attempts to weaken or destroy it.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND SCRIPTURE READERS’ ASSOCIATION, 56, Haymarket.—Present number of scripture readers employed 122. Object: To employ scripture readers under the superintendence of the parochial clergy.
CLERGY, CORPORATION OP THE, SONS OF THE, 2, Bloomsbury-place.
COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON’S COLLEGE, 13, Blomfield-street, London-wall.— Subscription: Voluntary, and vary in amount. Object: To educate young men for the Christian ministry.
COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON’S CONNEXION AND RELATED TRUSTS, 13, Blomfield-street, London-wall— Subscription: Voluntary, and vary in amount.
ENGLISH CHURCH UNION FOR COMMUNICANTS OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND, 35, Wellington-street, Sçrand.—Number of members and associates, 17,526—including 10 bishops, 2,500 other clergy, and 15,106 laity. Income, £8,000 a year. Subscription: 11s 6d. and upwards; associates, 6s. 6d. to 6d. a year. Objects: To defend, and maintain unimpaired, the Doctrine and Discipline of the Church of England; to afford council, protection, and assistance to all persons, lay or clerical, suffering under unjust aggression or hindrance in spiritual matters; and, in general, so to promote the interests of religion as to be, by God’s help, a lasting witness in the land for the advancement of His glory and the good of His Church. Monthly organ of the society, The Church Union Gazette, 1d., or 1s. 6d. a year, post paid.
ENGLISH CHURCH UNION, Wellington-street, Strand; City of London branch, 22, Charterhouse-square.— Subscription: Members, 5s.; associates, 1s. 6d. per annum, Object: To uphold the Catholic faith on the basis of the prayer-book.
EVANGELICAL CONTINENTAL SOCIETY, 13, Blomfield-st, London-wall— Subscription: (no information). Object: To assist and encourage evangelical societies on the Continent in their endeavour to propagate the Gospel, and by other means to promote the same, important end.
IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS, 11, Buckingham-street, Strand.— Subscription: (no information). Object: The Protestanting of Roman Catholics.
JEWISH NATIONAL FRIENDLY ASSOCIATION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF PASSOVER BREAD, 45, Great Prescot-street Whitechapel. Subscription: Members pay weekly, monthly, or quarterly any sum they desire. Object: manufacture and sale to its members of bread at a fraction above  cost price to pay for working expenses.
LONDON CITY MISSION, 3, Bridewell-place.— Subscription: Supported by voluntary contributions. Object: To extend the knowledge of the gospel among the inhabitants of London and its vicinity (especially the poor), without any reference to denominational distinctions or the peculiarities of Church government.
LONDON DOMESTIC MISSION, Christian-street. — Subscription: Voluntary. Object: The improvement of the moral and religious character of the poor, and the amelioration of their condition through the agency of missionaries who visit at their homes and assemble them for public worship, and by day and Sunday schools, lending libraries, evening classes, convalescent homes, penny banks.
LONDON FREE & OPEN CHURCH ASSOCIATION, 25, Norfolk-street, Strand.— Subscription: Optional. Object: Shown by title.
LONDON MEDICAL MISSION, 47, Endell-st, St. Giles’s. — Subscription: Voluntary. Object:
To heal the sick and preach the Gospel.
LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 14 Blomfield-st, London-wall— Object: The object of this Society is not to send any specific form of Church order and government to the heathen, but to leave them to adopt such form of Church government as may appear best to them.
LONDON SUNDAY SCHOOL CHOIR, 29, Canton-street.-— Subscription: None. Sunday-schools of all denominations are eligible for admission.
MARINERS’ FRIEND SOCIETY, 19, Old Gravel-lane, London-docks, St. George’s-in-the-East — Subscription: Any sum the donor is pleased to subscribe. Object: For promoting the spiritual and temporal welfare of seamen, fishermen, lightermen, dock labourers, and their families &c.
MISSIONS TO SEAMEN, 11, Buckingham-street, Strand.— Subscription: (no information). Object: To provide religious ministrations for the shipping in outer road-steads, harbours, rivers, and docks, at home and abroad; and generally to promote the spiritual welfare of the seafaring classes.
MISSIONARY LEAVES ASSOCIATION, 5, Tyndale-place, Islington. Subscription: (no information). Object: To assist the missionaries and native clergy of the Church Missionary Society.
MONTHLY TRACT SOCIETY, 5, New Bridge-st. — Subscription: Optional. Object: Shown by title.
NAVAL AND MILITARY BIBLE SOCIETY (Established 1780), 32, Sackville-street, Piccadilly.— Subscription: Voluntary. Object: To sell at a reduced price the Holy Scriptures to soldiers and sailors in the Imperial service, and to make free grants of such on application from naval and military chaplains, for purposes which the government do not meet.
NORTH-WEST LONDON AUXILIARY DEPOSITORY OF THE BRITISH & FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, 20, Princes-st, Cavendish-square.
OPEN AIR MISSION, 14, Duke-street, Adelphi.—Sustained by the subscriptions and donations of the benevolent. Object: Open-air preaching.
PALESTINE EXPLORATION FUND, 11 and 12, Charing-cross.— Subscription: Annual from 10s. 6d. upwards. Object : The elucidation of the Bible by exploration of the Holy Land.
PAROCHIAL MISSION WOMAN FUND, 11, Buckingham-street, Strand.—Supported by voluntary subscriptions and donations. Object: Explained by title.
PRAYER BOOK AND HOMILY SOCIETY, 11, Adam-street, Strand. — Subscription: £1 1s. Object: To make grants of the authorised editions of the prayer-book and of the homilies to poor parishes and schools.
ROCHESTER DIOCESAN SOCIETY, 26, Great George-street, Westminster.—Object: For supplying the spiritual needs of south London, south-east London, the suburbs south of the Thames, and the rural districts of Kent and Surrey.
ROYAL NAVAL SCRIPTURE READERS’ SOCIETY, 4, Trafalgar-square.—Object: To convey the Word of Life to the seamen and marines of Her Majesty’s fleet through the instrumentality of scripture readers
ST. ANDREW’S WATERSIDE CHURCH MISSION, 36, City-chambers, Railway-place, Fenchurch-street.—Subscription: Supported by voluntary contributions of money and books. Object: To encourage the worship of God at sea, and to advance the influence and teaching of the Church of England among sailors, fishermen, and emigrants, on board ship or elsewhere, through the agency of the parochial clergy at home, and the responsible clergy abroad.
ST. PAUL’S FOREIGN MISSION UNION, Choir House, Dean’s-court.— Subscription: Not less than 6d. per month. Object: Intercession for foreign missions, with special reference to the Universities mission to Central Africa.
SEAMEN’S MISSION AND SCHOOLS, 77, Augusta-st, Poplar. Subscription: Voluntary. Object: Open-air services round the coast, as well as in the mission-hall; educate the children of seamen, dock-labourers, and the poor of the locality.
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING THE EMPLOYMENT OF ADDITIONAL CURATES, 7, Whitehall.— Subscription: (no information). Object: To send missionaries to labour among the masses in our great towns; to supply the incumbents of the smaller towns with such a staff of assistant curates as may enable them to take efficient care of the souls committed to them; to send the Gospel message with the means of grace into the remote hamlets and scattered cottages of our wide agricultural parishes; to make provision for the 264,000 which are annually added to the population of the country.
SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE, 67, Lincoln’s-inn-fields. — Subscription: £1 1s. per annum. Object: The society is the great Bible and Prayer-book society of the Church, and spends a very large portion of its income every year in supplying these books: it is also a Church of England tract and pure literature society, as well as a great educational society in this country, while as the great church and school-building society for the Colonies, it has for many years assisted in erecting churches and schools in poor districts abroad.
SOUTH AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 11, Serjeant’s-inn, Fleet-st..—Object: Missionary work amongst the heathen, ministerial work amongst our own countrymen, and work of evangelisation among the Spaniards and Portuguese.
SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE CHURCH MISSIONS, 8, Adam-st Adelphi.— Object: The preaching and teaching of the Gospel in Spain and Portugal.
SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION. 37, Norfolk-street, Strand.— Subscription: 5s. per annum, or no less than £5 for life membership. Object: The publication of suitable books for Sunday schools and the promotion generally of Sunday school education.
THAMES CHURCH MISSION, 31, New Bridge-st. — Object: To minister to the spiritual necessities of the vast fluctuating population of the Thames. Services are held on all kinds of vessels, and on board the training-frigates Arethusa, Chichester, &c.
THE YOUNG MEN’S CATHOLIC ASSOCIATION, 22, Mortimer-street Regent-street.— Subscription: £1 per annum. Object: The self-improvement of its members, spiritual and intellectual, and the promotion of a more active and energetic Catholic life. This object is gained, in the first place, by the mutual support and encouragement afforded to the members by uniting in a true Catholic spirit and, in a secondary degree, by the advantages of a library, classes, lecture-rooms, and recreations.
TRINITARIAN BIBLE SOCIETY, 96, Newgate-st. — Subscription At the pleasure of the donor. Object: To circulate, at home and abroad, the pure Word of God without note or comment.
UNIVERSITITES MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA, 19, Delahay-st, Westminster. — Subscription: Voluntary. Object: The conversion of the natives to Christianity by the establishment of schools and mission stations.
WEEKLY TRACT SOCIETY 62, Paternoster-row. — Subscription: From 5s. per annum upwards; half the amount subscribed being returned in the society’s publications. Object: The religious instruction of the labouring classes.
WESLEYAN CONFERENCE OFFICE AND BOOK-ROOM, 2, Castle-street, City-road, and 60, Paternoster-row. — Object: For the publication of hymn books, standard religious works, reward books, and tracts.
WESLEYAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 17, Bishopsgate-street-within—Object: The preaching of the gospel, and educational work in foreign lands.
WEST LONDON AUXILIARY SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, 133, Edgware-road. — Subscription: Not stated. Object: Promotion and benefit of Sunday schools, and depot of Sunday school publications and requisites.
WORKING MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 7a, Marlborough-st, Chelsea—Object: To promote the moral, social, and spiritual well-being of its members.
WORKING MENS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 16a, Omega-place, Alpha-road. — Subscription: No fee imposed; subscriptions voluntary. Object: To promote Christianity specially among artisans and labourers, and also, by lectures and library, to enlarge their knowledge of men and things.

Restaurants.—A very few years ago the expectant diner, who required, in the public rooms of London, something better than a cut off the joint, or a chop or steak, would have had but a limited number of tables at his command. A really good dinner was almost entirely confined to the regions of club-land, and with one or two exceptions, respectable restaurants, to which a lady could be taken, may be said hardly to have existed at all. Artful seekers after surreptitious good dinners, who knew their London well, certainly had some foreign houses in the back settlements of Soho or of Leicester-square, to which they pinned their faith, but the restaurant, as it has been for many years understood in Paris, practically had no place in London. Time, which has changed the London which some of us knew, as it has changed most of the habits of society, has altered all this. It is probably trite that even now it is impossible to dine in public in London as well as that important ceremony can be performed in Paris. We have still no Café Riche or Café Anglais. The Maison Dorée of London that shall compare with that gilded and delightful, but all too expensive show in Paris, has still to be organised. Bignon is not for us as yet, nor Vachette. But so much has been done in twenty years, that those among us who are still respectably young, may look forward to the day when the glories— and the prices—of the Boulevard des Italiens may be ours. However that may be, one thing is certain ; that if you know where to go, and how to arrange your campaign, you can dine as well in London, in all styles and at all prices, as any reasonable gourmet can wish. Whether the hungry man or woman chooses to dine a la carte or on the table d’hote system, he or she must be difficult to please if London cannot produce something satisfactory. All that we propose to attempt in this article is to give some guide to the gastronomic chart of London. To box the entire compass would be impossible in the space at our command, and we must still leave whole continents to the curious explorer. If any table d’hote Stanley, or a la carte Cameron will communicate their future discoveries to us, the compilers of the Dictionary will do their best in future editions to keep the public properly posted on this most important subject.
Perhaps the oldest of the real restaurants in London is Verrey’s, in Regent-street, which still holds an excellent position among the a la carte houses. Somewhat in the line of Verrey’s, though on a larger scale, is Nicols’s, Café Royal, 68, Regent-street. At both these houses, people who know how to order their dinners will be thoroughly well served. It should be noted that the visitor who wishes to dine well at the Café Royal, or to dine in a private room, should go upstairs. Almost, if not quite as good as these houses, are Spiers and Pond’s Criterion, Piccadilly; the Grosvenor Restaurant, 136, New Bond-street; and the St. James’s Hall, Regent-street and Piccadilly. The specialty of these houses lies in their table d’hôte dinners. At the Criterion the table d’hote is served daily in the Grand Hall from 5.30 to 8 (on Sundays at 6), at 3s. 6d. ; the French dinner at the same hours, in the West Room, is 5s. per head. There is also a “joint” dinner at 2s. 6d. in the room on the right of the Piccadilly entrance ball. The table d’hote at the Grosvenor Restaurant is served from 5.30 to 8.30 at 5s.; and at St. James’s Hall the hours are 5.30 to 9, and the price 3s. 6d, and for the French dinner 5s. The Burlington, at the corner of New Burlington-street and Regent-street, is also well known for its set dinners at 5s, 7s. 6d, and 10s. 6d. The same prices are charged at the Pall Mall for the same sort of entertainment. Bertram & Roberts at the Royal Aquarium, provide two excellent dinners, one at 3s. 6d. and the other at 5s. The entrance to the hall is 1s, which must be added in estimating the price of the dinner. Strangers (even if not staying in the house) can also dine in the coffee-rooms, or at the table d’hote dinners at the following, among other, hotels: the Langham, 6s, at 6 o’clock; Inns of Court Hotel, 5s., at 6 oclock; the Midland (6 and 7.30, on Saturdays, and Sundays at 6 only), at 5s; and for a quieter dinner, Dieudonnes, in Ryder-street, at 6.30, for 4s, is well spoken of. It is worth a pilgrimage to the City to taste turtle soup and “fixings” at the “Ship and Turtle,” Leadenhall-street. Among other dinners may be mentioned the table d’hote at the Gaiety Restaurant of Messrs. Spiers & Pond, adjoining the Gaiety Theatre (3s. 6d); of the Holborn Restaurant at 218, Holborn (3s. 6d), with the specially of a selection of music by a good band during dinner-time; of the “Horseshoe”, Tottenham-court-rd (3s. 6d.). The Caledonian Hotel, Robert-street, Adelphi, also offers a 2s. 6d. table d’hote at 6 o’clock. Houses of a foreign type are very numerous, and of every order of merit; Kettner’s, Church-street, Soho (table d’hote, also a la carte), and Provitali’s, 14, Arundel-st, Coventry-street (table d’hote, 6.30 at 2s. 6d) enjoy as good a reputation as any. The “Globe,” 4, Coventry-street; the “Solferino,” 7, Rupert-street; the Sablonière Hotel, Leicester-square; Vargue’s Hotel de L’Europe, Leicester-square, and Bertolini’s, 32, St. Martin’s-street, Leicester-square, are alternative foreign houses, where a dinner may be had at moderate prices. At Romano’s Vaudeville Restaurant, 399, Strand, an unpretentious but well-cooked dinner may be relied on. If you take the trouble to order your dinner some hours beforehand, few of the smaller houses in London will do better than this. The old-fashioned fish and joint dinner, where the hungry Briton can “cut and come again,” still holds its own here and there. The best houses of this class are the “Albion,” Great Russell-street (opposite Drury-lane Theatre), where during the season an excellent haunch of venison is served every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 o’clock; Simpson’s, Strand; and the “Rainbow,” Fleet-street. The average charge for joint, cheese, &c, may be taken at 2s. 6d., with fish usually a1. extra. Carr’s, 265, Strand, where also the cut off the joint is the staple commodity, has the credit of having been the first house in London to recognise the public want of a cheap bottle of claret. It must be specially remembered in ordinary dinner a la carte at the foreign houses, that, as a general rule, “what is enough for one is enough for two.” If the waiter, on taking an order for two persons, enquires whether you wish one portion or two, it is certain that one is enough. If the point be not raised by the Waiter, the enquiry should be made by the diner.
It will be gathered from the foregoing summary that there are plenty of good dinners to be got in London, and of every kind and class, but unfortunately there is one point on which the conservatism of London caterers has not yet given way. The prices charged for wines—except so far as regards the light kinds of claret &c.—are uniformly absurd. Now that dining in public has become a recognised institution, it seems preposterous that a man should be charged twice as much for a bottle of champagne at a restaurant as it will cost him if supplied by his own wine merchant. Of course there is an obvious answer to this. Such matters as interest of money &c.
are always brought forward in justification of exorbitant prices for wines. When you come to vintage clarets and old bottled ports, this is no doubt all very well; but when, in 1879, you are called upon to pay 10s. or 12s. a bottle for wine bottled in about 1877, it would certainly seem as if there must be something wrong somewhere. (Also see CHOPS AND STEAKS, DINNERS, and FISH DINNERS.)

Richmond.—One of the prettiest and most favourite suburbs, especially for summer parties. Magnificent deer-park (Crown property), 2,253 acres, about one mile from station. Lovely view over river. Principal hotels: “Star and Garter,” on top of the hill at park-gates, and “Castle,” in the town— both dear, especially former. More moderate: “Roebuck,” on terrace. “Greyhound,” in the main Street, very reasonable, Richmond has of late been much affected by business men as a residence, and rents accordingly are enormously high, In choosing a house bear in mind that about one-third of the place is on gravel and the remainder on heavy clay. FLYS, 2/6 per hour. BOATS, up to 4 persons, 1/- first hour, -/6 after; 5 or 6, 1/6 first hour, 1/- after, 10/- per day; party of 8 or more, 3/- first hour, 2/6 after with man, or 15/- per day. STEAMERS run from London-bridge Sundays and Mondays during the summer months, at 10 am., calling at all piers up the river; fares, 1/- single 1/6 return. There is also a special service for the Easter holidays. TRAINS from Waterloo (loop line) at frequent intervals (about 30 min) 1st 1/3, 2/-; 2nd, 1/-, 1/6; 3rd; --/9, 1/3. From the Mansion-house (about 47 min. ), 1st, 1/6, 2/3; and, 1/3, 1/9; 3rd ,-/10, 1/8. From Aldgate (about 60 min.), 1st, 1/8, 2/6; 2nd, 1/4, 1/11; 3rd, -/11,1/8. Omnibuses run from Broad-street, City, at 10.10 and 11.55 am, and 12.39, 3, and 5.30 p,m. During winter they run on Sundays only, Cab fare direct.

Riding Horses and Schools.—The best riding-schools of London are not to be found in London at all, but in London-super-Mare, better known as Brighton; but, notwithstanding, the art of riding can be attained even in London. One of the very best establishments in town is that of Mr. Allen, at 70, Seymour-place, Bryanston-square, which has as good a covered school as can be found. In this case, as in all matters of education, much must necessarily depend upon circumstances; but it may be roughly said that two dozen lessons from a competent instructor will cost 7 guineas in the school, and 11 guineas on the road. A shorter course will cost proportionately more. The hire of a riding-horse, like everything else in London, varies almost absurdly according to the time of year; a useful horse, which out of the season can be
hired at from 5 to 7 guineas per month, will cost between the middle of April and the middle of July from 10 to 12 guineas. These prices at a first-class house include every charge from corn to shoes.

Road Club, 4, Park-place, St. James’s, consists of not more than 500 members, other than supernumerary or honorary members, being noblemen and gentlemen driving four-in-hand, and who are interested in the revival of coaching in England; their friends, and all who take an interest in field or other sports. The entrance fee, first fixed at £10 10s., is now raised to £15 15s.; subscription, £8 8s.—(See COACHING.)

Rous Club, 307, Regent-street,—No special qualification. Non-political and proprietary. Election by ballot of the Committee; one black ball in three excludes. Visitors to London are eligible as temporary members on payment of £1 1s. per month, on approval by the committee. Subscription, £3 3s.

Rowing has for many years been most popular among London athletes, and, like every other kind of physical exercise, has greatly increased in public esteem during the last few years. Not to mention the University Boat Race, the extraordinary vogue of which is perhaps more due to a kind of craze in the public mind than to any love of aquatic sport for its own sake, good boat-racing on the Thames always attracts a vast number of spectators. Such a sight as the river presented when, for instance, Oxford and Harvard, or London and Atalanta, fought out their memorable battles has rarely been seen. On Saturday afternoons, when the tide is favourable, above bridge the river swarms with boats, and the races among the members of the numerous clubs make things very lively. At such times a walk on the towing-path about Putney or Barnes is a pleasant change for the Londoner; but it is necessary to bear in mind that the tide occasionally rises very quickly and very high about Putney and Hammersmith, and that the towing-path under such circumstances has an uncomfortable way of disappearing under water. High tide at Putney is about three-quarters of an hour later than at London-bridge. The best points from which to see the great boat-races are just above Hammersmith-bridge, opposite Chiswick Church, or Barnes-terrace, and at the Ship at Mortlake, a little above which the winning-post generally is. Thirteen years ago a large sum of money was subscribed by members of the London amateur clubs, and valuable challenge prizes were bought for competition annually at the Metropolitan Amateur Regatta. The regatta takes place shortly after the great meeting at Henley, as a rule, but has never quite answered the expectations of its founders. There is also a good regatta every summer for professionals and “tradesmen’s” clubs; and Barnes and Mortlake Amateur Regatta is usually an excellent afternoon’s sport. But the stranger to London aquatics who wishes to see the river at its best should select one of the championship races between professional scullers, especially if London and Newcastle are pitted against each other, and should endeavour to secure a place on one of the accompanying Steamers. Putney, Barnes, and Mortlake are all reached (twenty minutes to half an hour) by the South-Western Railway; and at Hammersmith there is a Station of the Metropolitan Railway. Omnibuses also run to Fulham, which is just opposite Putney, and to Hammersmith. Boats may be hired at almost any point on the river from London-bridge upwards, the best places being at Chelsea, Wandsworth, Putney, Barnes, Richmond, and Kingston. For particulars respecting the delightful trip from Oxford to London, see THAMES. The principal clubs on the London Thames have been for many years able to hold their own against college and even university crews at Henley and elsewhere, and one of the oldest of them—the famous London Rowing Club—even succeeded, twenty years ago, in beating Oxford and Cambridge Universities in the two days of Henley Regatta. The old club, which has performed the extraordinary feat of winning the Steward’s Cup at Henley for four oars on ten occasions during the last eleven years, and has produced some of the most famous oarsmen of modern times, such as Casamajor, the three Playfords, Stout, Long, Ryan, Fenner, Gulston, and many others, still takes the lead In London aquatics. It has recently been run very hard by the Thames Rowing Club, which is as strong in pluck and energy as it is in numbers. The oldest of all the London clubs except, perhaps, that of the Westminster boys, is the Leander which is principally composed of past university oarsmen, and it is probably owing to a desire to rest from their labours undertaken on behalf of their colleges and universities, that its members rarely appear at regattas. The Ilex is another old, but much smaller club, which also rarely appears in public. Letters to the secretaries of all these clubs may be addressed to Putney. At Hammersmith will be found, among others, the Inn and North London Clubs; and Wandsworth is the head-quarters of the West London, a club which has the credit of having originated many years ago the athletic sports which are now so interesting a feature in London life. At Chiswick is the Grove-park Rowing Club, a young and promising institution; and the head-quarters of the Kingston Rowing Club and the Twickenham Rowing Club are indicated by their respective names; the former being noteworthy as having won the Wyfold Cup for fours at Henley from 1863 to 1868 inclusive. Entrance fees and subscriptions to all these clubs are on a very moderate scale. In addition to the above purely amateur clubs there is a whole host of so-called “tradesmen’s” clubs with a large professional leaven. There are also good clubs on the Lea, head-quarters as a rule at Lea-bridge, either at the “Jolly Anglers” or Green’s, although that river cannot be recommended for rowing purposes in comparison with the Thames. The principal Lea clubs are the Alexandra, Albion, Vesper, Orion, Hackney, and Neptune. Clasper and Salter of Oxford (the former also at Wandsworth), Biffen of Hammersmith, and Messenger of Kingston, are the principal builders of boats for London men; the last-named having a specialty for comfortable gigs and skiffs for “journey” rowing, as it is generally called, as distinguished from racing. Information as to rowing matters may be readily found in all the sporting papers, the reports of races in the Field being exceptionally well done; and rowing men in London are particularly fortunate in their special organ, the “Rowing Almanack,” an annual published at the Field office and edited by one of the best practical judges of rowing and matters aquatic in England. Canoeing may be called an off-shoot of rowing, and the canoe club is to be found at Moulsey, where there is also a good rowing club. At Kingston is also established a boat sailing club, which shows occasionally good sport under considerable difficulties.

Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly. The annual exhibition, which is open from the beginning of May to the end of July, and the winter exhibitions of loan pictures, are too well known to require any detailed description here. But it is perhaps not generally known that the interesting collection of pictures presented by Academicians on receiving that distinction, known as the diploma pictures, may be seen daily from 11 till 4 on application to the secretary. In addition to providing one of the largest picture shows in the world—from the proceeds of which its income is derived—the Royal Academy fulfils important functions as an educational establishment. Professors of painting, sculpture, architecture, and anatomy are appointed by the academy, and medals and prizes are annually awarded to successful students.

Royal Exchange (The) was opened by Queen Victoria on January 1st, 1845. It was built after the designs of Sir W. Tite, and cost no less than £150,000. The old exchange, which occupied the present site, was built after the Great Fire, and again suffered from the same element in 1838. The first Exchange was opened by Queen Elizabeth in 1570, who, by her herald, declared the house to be “The Royal Exchange.” Sir Thomas Gresham introduced exchanges into England, but they had been popular in most of the commercial cities of Italy, Germany, and the Netherlands, many years previous to their adoption here. The present edifice is almost an oblong, and encloses a courtyard open to the sky, round which is an ambulatory 170 ft. long by 113 ft. In the centre of the open space is a marble statue of Her Majesty, and about this image of the Queen merchants and traders meet at certain hours to transact business and discuss matters affecting finance and commerce. The ceiling of the ambulatory is worth looking at. It is divided by beams and panelling, and lavishly decorated. In the four angles are the arms of Edward the Confessor, Edward III., Queen Elizabeth, and Charles II. Busts and armorial bearings of eminent persons abound including those of Whittington and Gresham. The west front, which is the principal entrance, is by far the most impressive. It consists of a Corinthian portico, with columns upwards of 40 ft high. On the frieze is an inscription in Latin, explaining that the Exchange was founded in the thirteenth year of Queen Elizabeth, and restored in the seventh of Queen Victoria. The apartments above the ambulatory are occupied, for the most part, by large insurance companies, and by “Lloyds” rooms. (See LLOYD’S.) NEAREST Railway Station, Mansion House (Dist) Moorgate-st (Metrop.), and Cannon-st (S.E.); Omnibus Route, Bank; Cab Rank, Bartholomew-lane.

Royal Naval School, New-cross, is principally intended for sons of officers in the Royal Navy or Marines of ward-room rank, but sons of civilians are admitted at a somewhat increased rate of payment. Previous to admission a form of application must be filled up by the boy’s parent or guardian. This, with all further particulars, may be obtained of the secretary at the school. The charges range from £58 per annum to £42 10s., but the cost of education in this school so greatly depends upon nominations, circumstances and professions of parents, &c.. that it is impossible here to give a detailed list. NEAREST Railway Stations, New-cross (L.B.& S.C. and SE.) Omnibus Route, New-cross-road.

Royalty Theatre, Dean-street, Soho—A pretty little house in Soho, formerly known by the name of that locality, and better still as “Miss Kelly’s.” NEAREST Railway Stations, Charing-cross (S.E. and Dist.), and Portland-road; Omnibus Routes, Oxford-st, Regent-st, and St. Martin’s-lane.

Rubbish.—(See ASHES.)

Russell Club, 216 Regent-street. — Proprietary. For ladies and gentlemen, is founded for the purpose of affording all the advantages of a high-class club to ladies, clergymen, officers in the army and navy, members of the civil and diplomatic service, professional and private gentlemen. The admission of members into the club is by election by the committee; three members forming a quorum. The entrance fees and annual subscriptions being at present somewhat complicated, intending candidates are recommended to apply to the secretary for information.

Russia. —EMBASSY, Chesham House, Belgrave-square. NEAREST Railway Station, Victoria; Omnibus Routes, Knightsbridge, Sloane-street, and Grosvenor-place. Cab Rank, Pont-street. CONSULATE, 17, Winchester-street.